TX_HMH_G1WTG_M7

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WRITING TEACHER’S GUIDE GRADE 1

GRAMMARMINILESSONS • TOPICS AND S

TOPIC 1

TOPIC 4

TK ................................. G000 SENTENCES W196

ADJECTIVES, ADVERBS AND PREPOSITIONS ... • Skill 1: Adjectives: Size and Shape; Arti • Skill 2: Adjectives: Color and Number • Skill 3: Adjectives: The Senses • Skill 4: Adjectives That Compare • Skill 5: Adverbs • Skill 6: Prepositions and Prepositional

• Skill 1: TK • Skill 2: TK • Skill 3: TK • Skill 4: TK

Complete Sentences Sentence Parts

Statements Commands • Skill 5: Subjects and Verbs • Skill 6: Questions • Skill 7: Compound Sentences • Skill 8: Exclamations • Skill 9: Kinds of Sentences

TOPIC 5

CONTRACTIONS .........

TOPIC 2

NOUNS AND PRONOUNS .................. W241

• Skill 1: Contractions

• Skill 1: Common Nouns: People and Animals • Skill 2: Common Nouns: Places and Things • Skill 3: Singular and Plural Nouns • Skill 4: Proper Nouns • Skill 5: Names of Months, Days, and Holidays • Skill 6: Subject Pronoun

TOPIC 6

SPELLING ...................

• Skill 1: Frequently Misspelled Words

• Skill 7: The Pronouns I and Me • Skill 8: Possessive Pronouns • Skill 9: Indefinite Pronouns

TOPIC 3

VERBS ......................... W286

• Skill 1: Action Verbs • Skill 2: Verbs and Time • Skill 3: The Verb Be • Skill 4: Future Tense

Welcome to HMH Into Readi

WRITINGWORKSHOP • MODULES

GRAMMARMINILESSONS • TOPICS AND S

MODULE 1

MODULE 4

MODULE 7

MODULE 10

TOPIC 1

TOPIC 4

NARRATIVE ORAL STORY ..................... W1

INFORMATIONAL TEXT PROCEDURAL TEXT ........ W49

POETRY POEM ............................ W97 SENTENCES

TK ................................. G000

INFORMATIONAL TEXT BIOGRAPHICAL ESSAY ... W145 W196

ADJECTIVES, ADVERBS ND PREPOSITIONS ... • Skill 1: Adjectives: Size and Shape; Arti • Skill 2: Adjectives: Color and Number • Skill 3: Adjectives: The Senses • Skill 4: Adjectives That Compare • Skill 5: Adverbs • Skill 6: Prepositions and Prepositional

Focal Text: Ask Me, by Bernard Waber; Illustrated by Suzy Lee Focus Statement: Take a walk in nature! • Skill 1: TK • Skill 2: TK • Skill 3: TK • Skill 4: TK

Complete Sentences Sentence Parts

Focal Text: Ralph Tells a Story, by Abby Hanlon Focus Statement: Everyone has a story to tell.

Focal Text: Do Unto Otters, by Laurie Keller Focus Statement: To make a friend, be a friend.

Focal Text: The Girl Who Could Dance in Outer Space, by Maya Cointreau Focus Statement: People who follow their dreams can inspire us.

Statements Commands • Skill 5: Subjects and Verbs • Skill 6: Questions • Skill 7: Compound Sentences • Skill 8: Exclamations • Skill 9: Kinds of Sentences

TOPIC 5

CONTRACTIONS .........

MODULE 2

MODULE 5

MODULE 8

MODULE 11

INFORMATIONAL TEXT DESCRIPTIVE ESSAY ......... W17

NARRATIVE IMAGINATIVE STORY ....... W65

NARRATIVE PERSONAL NARRATIVE ... W113 TOPIC 2

OPINION OPINION LETTER ........... W161 • Skill 1: Contractions

NOUNS AND PRONOUNS .................. W241

Focal Text: Nana in the City, by Lauren Castillo Focus Statement: Our world is a special place.

Focal Text: Why the Sun and Moon Live in the Sky, by Elphinstone Dayrell Focus Statement: We’ve got the sun in the morning and the moon at night!

Focal Text: The Kissing Hand, by Audrey Penn; Illustrated by Ruth E. Harper and Nancy M. Leak Focus Statement: Special people can help us solve our problems.

Focal Text: I Will Not Read This Book, by Cece Meng; Illustrated by Joy Ang Focus Statement: Reading is fun! TOPIC 6

• Skill 1: Common Nouns: People and Animals • Skill 2: Common Nouns: Places and Things • Skill 3: Singular and Plural Nouns • Skill 4: Proper Nouns • Skill 5: Names of Months, Days, and Holidays • Skill 6: Subject Pronoun

SPELLING ...................

• Skill 1: Frequently Misspelled Words

• Skill 7: The Pronouns I and Me • Skill 8: Possessive Pronouns • Skill 9: Indefinite Pronouns

MODULE 3

MODULE 6

MODULE 9

MODULE 12

INFORMATIONAL TEXT RESEARCH ESSAY ........... W33

NARRATIVE PERSONAL NARRATIVE .... W81

INFORMATIONAL TEXT DESCRIPTIVE ESSAY ....... W129

OPINION OPINION ESSAY ............. W177

Focal Text: One Bean, by Anne Rockwell; Illustrated by Megan Halsey Focus Statement: One can learn a lot just by watching things happen. TOPIC 3

Focal Text: Giraffes, by Kate Riggs Focus Statement: Animals are amazing!

Focal Text: The Thanksgiving Door, by Debby Atwell Focus Statement: Holidays bring people together.

Focal Text: Big Bad Bubble, by Adam Rubin; Illustrated by Daniel Salmieri Focus Statement: We should use the skills we’ve learned.

VERBS ......................... W286

• Skill 1: Action Verbs • Skill 2: Verbs and Time • Skill 3: The Verb Be • Skill 4: Future Tense

vi

vii Welcome to HMH Into Readi

WritingWorkshop Teacher’s Guide

Welcome to HMH Into Reading ™ Texas

Program Features

Small Group Conferences • Tell children that good writers share their work with other writers before revising in order to get feedback: When someone else reads my writing, that person usually notices something I have missed. That person might also have ideas I’ll want to include in my writing. • Arrange children into groups of four or five. Explain to children that they will play a game called Pointing . Write the following on the board. Scaffolded Writing Instruction for English Learners As English learners participate in h Writing Workshop, scaffolded instructi n helps the teacher meet them at their own language proficiency levels and leverage what they already know. TK ................................. G000 TOPIC 1 SENTENCES W196 Complete Sentences Sentence Parts ADJECTIVES, ADVERBS AND PREPOSITIONS ... TOPIC 4 GRAMMARMINILESSONS • TOPICS AND S

REVISING I: GROUPING

LESSON 10

LESSON 10 LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Share information about a topic. • Follow rules for discussion. • Listen actively. • Ask and answer questions. • Language Respond to a presentation by asking a question.

• Skill 1: TK • Skill 2: TK • Skill 3: TK • Skill 4: TK

• Skill 1: Adjectives: Size and Shape; Arti • Skill 2: Adjectives: Color and Number • Skill 3: Adjectives: The Senses • Skil 4: Adjectives That Compare • Skill 5: Adverbs • Skill 6: Prepositions and Prepositional

Support English learners using a variety of research-based strategies to • focus on academic language and vocabulary • link background knowledge and culture to learning • increase comprehensible input • support language output with sentence frames • promote classroom interaction

REVISING I: GROUPING

Small Group Conferences • Tellchildren thatgoodwritersshare theirworkwithotherwritersbefore revising in order toget feedback: Whensomeoneelse readsmywriting, thatpersonusually noticessomething Ihavemissed.Thatpersonmightalsohave ideas I’llwant to include inmywriting. • Arrangechildren intogroupsof fouror five.Explain tochildren that theywillplaya gamecalled Pointing .Write the followingon theboard. Statements Commands • Skill 5: Subjects and Verbs • Skill 6: Questions • Skill 7: Compound Sentences • Skill 8: Exclamations • Skill 9: Kinds of Sentences • Each writer will take turns reading his or her book aloud twice. • The listeners should look at the writer during the first reading. • During the second reading, the listeners should write down positive ideas to point out what they liked.

• Each writer will take turns reading his or her book aloud twice. • The listeners should look at the writer during the first reading. • During the second reading, the listeners should write own positive ideas to point out what they liked.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Share informationabouta topic. • Follow rules fordiscussion. • Listenactively. • Askandanswerquestions. • Language Respond toapresentation byaskingaquestion.

TARGETED GRAMMAR SUPPORT

TARGETED GRAMMAR SUPPORT You may want to consult the following grammar minilessons to review key revising topics. • 1.1.2 Complete Sentences I, p. W197 • 1.3.1 Statements, p. W206 • 1.3.3Writing Statements, p. W208 Youmaywant toconsult the following grammarminilessons to reviewkey revising topics. • 1.1.2CompleteSentences I, p.W197 • 1.3.1Statements, p.W206 • 1.3.3WritingStatements, p.W208 LEARNING MINDSET: Problem Solving

• Demonstrate forchildren firsthow to read, listen,andgivehelpfulpointers. Iwill beginby reading thewriter’smodelaloudandyouwill listen. Read themodelaloud. Now, Iwill read themodelaloudasecond time.As I read,youshouldwritedownany positivepointsyouwant tomakeabout thewriter’smodel.Youmightwritedown somethingyou learnedoraquestionyouhaveabouthorses.When Iamdone reading, a fewofyoucanshareyourpositivepoints. Read themodelaloudasecond time. Havechildrenpractice listening,writing,and taking turnsprovidingpositive pointers. • Havechildren take turns in theirowngroupsby following thesamesteps. Engage and Respond • Discusswithchildren theexperienceof readingaloud theirworkandhavingother writers respond to it.Guide them tounderstand that theexperiencewillmake thembetterwriters. • Demonstrate for children first how to read, listen, and give helpful pointers. I will begin by reading the writer’s model aloud and you will listen. Read the model aloud. Now, I will read the model aloud a second time. As I read, you should write down any positive points you want to make about the writer’s model. You might write down something you learned or a question you have about horses. When I am done reading, a few of you can s are your positive points. Read the model aloud a second time. Have children practice listening, writing, and taking turns providing positive pointers. • Have children take turns in their own groups by following the same steps. Engage and Respond • Discuss with children the experience of reading aloud their work and having other writers respond to it. Guide them to understand that the experience will make them better writers. NOUNS AND PRONOUNS .................. W241 • Skill 1: Common Nouns: People and Animals • Skill 2: Common Nouns: Places and Things • Skill 3: Singular and Plural Nouns • Skill 4: Proper Nouns • Skill 5: Names of Months, Days, and Holidays • Skill 6: Subject Pronoun • Skill 1: Contractions TOPIC 5 TOPIC 6 ENGLISH LEARNER SUPPORT: Tiered Support Helpachildwhohasdrawnpicturesusekeywords tosharehisorherwriting. Givechildrensentence frames tosharewhat they learned fromanotherwriter’swork: I learned that . Havechildren readaloud theirwork toyoubeforepresenting to theclass.Help thempronounce challengingwords. ADVANCED/ADVANCEDHIGH INTERMEDIATE BEGINNING

CONTRACTIONS .........

TOPIC 2

Apply Promptchildren toexplainhow beingcuriousabout theirclassmates’ essayscanhelp themprovidegood feedback. Ifyouarecuriousabout the topic,youcanpaycloseattentionasyou look foropportunities foryourclassmates to improve theirall-aboutbooks. Tell children that theycanapply their curiosity to the taskof revisingbybeing curiousabout the topicandhow the essay iswritten.

LEARNING MINDSET: Problem Solving

SPELLING ...................

TEXASESSENTIALKNOWLEDGEANDSKILLS 1.1A listenactively/askandanswerquestions; essays can help them provide good feedback. If you are curious about the topic, you can pay close attention as you look for opportunities for your class ates to improve their all-about books. Tell children that they can apply their curiosity to the task of revising by being curious about the topic and how the essay is written. 1.1C share informationand ideasabout topic/speakwith appropriatepace/useconventionsof language; 1.1D work collaborativelyby following rules fordiscussion; ENGLISH LANGUAGEPROFICIENCYSTANDARDS 1D speakusing learningstrategies; 2H understand implicit ideas/ information inspoken language; 2I demonstrate listening comprehensionofspokenEnglish; 3A practicesounds/ pronunciationofEnglishwords; 3E share information in cooperative learning interactions; 3F ask/give information in variouscontexts Apply Prompt children to explain how being curious about their classmates’

• Skill 1: Frequently Misspelled Words

BEGINNING • Skill 7: The Pronouns I and Me • Skill 8: Possessive Pronouns • Skill 9: Indefinite Pronouns

W43

InformationalText• ResearchEssay

ENGLISH LEARNER SUPPORT: Tiered Support

Help a child who has drawn pictures use key words to share his or her writing.

INTERMEDIATE

Give children sentence frames to share what they learned from another writer’s work: I learned that .

TOPIC 3

ADVANCED/ADVANCED HIGH VERBS ......................... W286

Have children read aloud their work to you before presenting to the class. Help them pronounce challenging words.

• Skill 1: Action Verbs • Skill 2: Verbs and Time • Skill 3: The Verb Be • Skill 4: Future Tense

TEXAS ESSENTIAL KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS 1.1A listen actively/ask and answer questions;

1.1C share information and ideas about topic/speak with appropriate pace/use conventions of language; 1.1D work collaboratively by following rules for discussion; ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY STANDARDS 1D speak using learning strategies; 2H understand implicit ideas/ information in spoken language; 2I demonstrate listening comprehension of spoken English; 3A practice sounds/ pronunciation of English words; 3E share information in cooperative learning interactions; 3F ask/give information in various contexts

ix

Welcome to HMH Into Reading ™ Texas

Welcome to HMH Into Readi

W43

Informational Text • Research Essay

GRAMMARMINILESSONS • TOPICS AND SKILLS G AMMARMI ILESS NS • TOPICS AND S

TOPIC 1

TOPIC 4

TOPIC 1

TOPIC 4

TK ................................. G000 SENTENCES W196 TK . . . SENTENCES

ADJECTIVES, ADVERBS, AND PREPOSITIONS ..... W306 W196 • Skill 1: Adjectives: Size and Shape; Articles • Skill 2: Adjectives: Color and Number • Skill 3: Adjectives: The Senses • Skill 4: Adjectives That Compare • Skill 5: Adverbs • Skill 6: Prepositions and Prepositional Phrases

JECTIVES, ADVERBS AND PREPOSITIONS ... • Skill 1: Adjectives: Size and Shape; Arti • Skill 2: Adjectives: Color and Number • Skill 3: Adjectives: The Senses • Skill 4: Adj ctives That Compare • Skill 5: Adverbs • Skill 6: Prepositions and Prepositional

.................... G000

• Skill 1: TK • Skill 2: TK • Skill 3: TK • Skill 4: TK

• Skill 1: TK • Skill 2: TK • Skill 3: TK • Skill 4: TK

Complete Sentences Sentence Parts

Complete Sentences Sentence Parts

Statements Commands • Skill 5: Subjects and Verbs • Skill 6: Questions • Skill 7: Compound Sentences • Skill 8: Exclamations • Skill 9: Kinds of Sentences

Statements Commands • Skill 5: Subjects and Verbs • Skill 6: Questions • Skill 7: Compound Sentences • Skill 8: Exclamations • Skill 9: Kinds of Sentences

TOPIC 5

TOPIC 5

CONTRACTIONS ........... W336

CONTRACTIONS .........

TOPIC 2

TOPIC 2

NOUNS AND PRONOUNS .................. W241

NOUNS AND PRONOUNS .................. W241

• Skill 1: Contractions

• Skill 1: Contractions

• Skill 1: Common Nouns: People and Animals • Skill 2: Common Nouns: Places and Things • Skill 3: Singular and Plural Nouns • Skill 4: Proper Nouns • Skill 5: Names of Months, Days, and Holidays • Skill 6: Subject Pronoun

TOPIC 6 • Skill 1: Common Noun : People and Animals • Skill 2: Common Nouns: Places and Things • Skill 3: Singular and Plural Nouns • Skill 4: Proper Nouns • Skill 5: Names of Month , Days, and Holidays • Skill 6: Subject Pronoun

TOPIC 6

SPELLING ..................... W341

SPELLING ..................

Add letters, words, or sentences.

Add a comma.

Add quotation marks.

• Skill 1: Frequently Misspelled Words

• Skill 1: Frequently Misspelled Words

Begin a new paragraph. Indent.

Add a period.

a

• Skill 7: The Pronouns I and Me • Skill 8: Possessive Pronouns • Skill 9: Indefinite Pronouns

• Skill 7: The Pronouns I and Me • Skill 8: Possessive Pronouns • Skill 9: Indefinite Pronouns

delete

flop

flip

R

Capitalize a letter.

Take out words, sentences, or punctuation.

Grammar2.2.3a

Make a capital letter into a lowercase one. Add -’s toa singularnoun tomake itpossessive. Whenapluralnounendswith -s ,addanapostrophe tomake itpossessive. Whenapluralnoundoesnotend in -s ,add -’s tomake itpossessive. ApostropheUse inPossessiveNouns Switch the order of letters or words.

singularpossessive The rabbit’s ears twitched.

pluralpossessive Wecould see the foxes’ tails.

TOPIC 3

TOPIC 3

NounsandPronouns • PossessiveNouns

Grade4 | GrammarMinilessons

VERBS ......................... W286

VERBS . .................... W286

• Skill 1: Action Verbs • Skill 2: Verbs and Time • Skill 3: The Verb Be • Skill 4: Future Tense

• Skill 1: Action Verbs • Skill 2: Verbs and Time • Skill 3: The Verb Be • Skill 4: Future Tense

Grammar2.2.3b

ApostropheUse inPossessiveNouns

Add theapostrophescorrectly in the followingpossessivenouns.

1 Themanshatblewoff. 2 Allof thebirds songs fell silent. 3 The teamsprojectwon firstprize. 4 The skaterscostumesweregold. 5 Thechildrenseyesgrewwide. 6 The three littlepigs tailsuncurled.

NounsandPronouns • PossessiveNouns

Grade4 | GrammarMinilessons

xi

Welcome to HMH Into Reading ™ Texas

Welcome to HMH Into Readi

MODULE 7

POETRY

Poem FOCUS STATEMENT Take a walk in nature!

FOCAL TEXT Ask Me Author: Bernard Waber Illustrator: Suzy Lee

WRITING PROMPT

WRITE a poem about things you like.

Summary: A girl and her father take a walk, making observations and asking questions as they stroll.

LESSONS

1 Priming the Students

b Editing I: Reviewing for Grammar

2 Priming the Text

c Editing II: Preparing to Publish

3 The Read

d Publishing

4 Vocabulary

e Sharing

5 Prewriting I: Finding a Topic

6 Prewriting II: Developing a Topic

7 Drafting I: Elements of Poetry

LEARNING MINDSET: h4-lm p_body-lm Noticing Display Anchor Chart 53: My Learning Mindset throughout the year. Refer to it to introduce Noticing and to reinforce the skills you introduced in previous modules.

8 Drafting II: Choosing the Right Words

9 Revising I: Word Choice

0 Revising II: Grouping

a Revising III: Line Breaks andWhite Space

W97

Poetry • Poem

PRIMING THE STUDENTS LESSON 1

PRIMING THE TEXT

LESSON 2

Explore the Genre • Write the spark word poem on chart paper. Explain that spark words are words that “spark” other thoughts in our brains. • Ask: What words or ideas do you think of when you read the word poem ? Write children’s responses on the chart. • Model adding your own notes to the chart. THINK ALOUD When I think of the word poem , I think of feelings. Poems can make me feel happy, sad, or even scared. I will write feelings . Also, some poets use the five senses to describe something in a poem. I will write senses . • Share the words poem , rhyme , and free verse and write their definitions on the board. Have children add the words to their Writer’s Vocabulary glossaries. • Explain that some poets like to use rhyme. Share a simple rhyming poem, such as a nursery rhyme. Emphasize the rhyming words while reading. Ask: Can you think of other poems that rhyme? • Tell children that some poems, such as free verse poems, do not rhyme. Share an example of a short poemwritten in free verse. • Have partners Turn and Talk about their favorite poems and poets.

Connect to the Topic • Tell children that many poems are about nature. Read aloud two short lyric poems about nature—one rhyming and one that does not rhyme, such as haiku. • Explain that poets sometimes get ideas by taking nature walks. If possible, take children outside and have them record their observations in their notebooks. If a walk is not possible, show children pictures of nature or a short nature video.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Share ideas and opinions about poetry. • Discuss elements of poetry, including rhyme and free verse. • Language Express opinions in a small group discussion about a topic. MATERIALS Classroommaterials chart paper, markers, sample rhyming and free verse poems Display and Engage 7.1 Online WRITER’S VOCABULARY • free verse: a poem that does not rhyme or have a regular rhythm or “beat” • poem: a piece of writing that may have rhyme, rhythm, or sensory words on separate lines • rhyme: the repetition of the same sound(s) at the end of words Introduce Explain to children that it’s helpful for us to notice, or look closely, at what we are learning. Noticing helps us to “try smarter” when we are learning. We can see what we are doing right and what we want to make better. Poets look closely at the words they use when they write poems. Poems are not as long as stories, so poets must make the best choices when they write. They need to look closely at the words they use to write a poem that readers will want to read. LEARNING MINDSET: Noticing

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Build background knowledge to prepare to read. • Identify basic poetic elements, such as rhyme. • Make predictions about what will happen in a text. • Language Share ideas related to topic.

Preview the Text • Show the cover of Ask Me . Point to the picture of the characters holding hands. Ask: Who do you think will do the asking in the book? Who will do the telling? • Take a picture walk through the book. Have children make additional predictions about what will happen in the text. Record predictions on chart paper.

MATERIALS

Online

Focal Text Ask Me Display and Engage 7.2 Writer’s Notebook p. 7.1

Classroommaterials two nature poems (one rhyming and one in free verse), index cards, chart paper, markers

Craft a Class Poem • Show Display and Engage 7.2 and share the sample poem “Here Comes the Storm” with the children. • Distribute an index card and a copy of Writer’s Notebook page 7.1 to each child. Ask children to write one word from their nature observations on the card. The word should reflect or describe an element of nature. • Collect the index cards. Choose five or

Ask Me

DISPLAY AND ENGAGE

DONOTEDIT--Changesmustbemade through“File info” CorrectionKey=NL-A

Poem 7.2

Discuss the Focus Statement • Show and read aloud Display and Engage 7.1 . Tell children they will discuss the Focus Statement and experiences they have had in nature. • Write these discussion questions on the board: What can you see in nature? What do you like about nature? Have children discuss their answers with partners or in small groups. • After children have finished the discussion, ask a volunteer from each group to report their findings. Ask: Why might people write poems about nature?

Sample Poem

DISPLAY AND ENGAGE

Here Comes a Storm Clouds moving fast, Sky getting dark. Wind whipping, whipping. Rain dripping, dripping.

DONOTEDIT--Changesmustbemade through“File info” CorrectionKey=NL-A

Poem 7.1

Focus Statement

Take a walk in nature!

more cards and tape them to the board. Together, write a short poem using some or all of the words. First, let’s choose a topic for our poem. Some examples might be a winter day, a storm, or the beauty of nature. • Guide children to help you put the index cards in order to describe the topic, adding other words for meaning. Ask: Should our poem rhyme or be in free verse? If a rhyming poem is chosen, have volunteers brainstorm rhyming words for the end of each line. • Choral read the class poem. • Discuss the poem as a class. Ask: How does the poemmake you feel about nature? Did writing the poemwith rhyming words (or free verse) make it fun to read? Would you have made any changes? Grade 1 | WritingWorkshop 1re_de_wr_07_poem.indd 2

Module7

TEACHER TIP Select a mentor lyric poem to serve as a pattern for the class poem. Write the mentor poem on the board. Then, replace some of the mentor text with words children wrote on index cards. Change tenses of words, as necessary.

2/18/18 4:50PM

Grade 1 | WritingWorkshop

Module7

1re_de_wr_07_poem.indd 1

2/18/18 4:50PM

ENGLISH LEARNER SUPPORT: Facilitate Discussion

BEGINNING

Allow children to draw their responses to the discussion questions.

INTERMEDIATE

Provide children with the following sentence frame: I see _____ in nature. I like _____ in nature.

ADVANCED/ADVANCED HIGH

Provide children with further questions to answer, such as: What do you like to do in nature? What season do you like most?

ENGLISH LEARNER SUPPORT: Utilize Language Transfer ALL LEVELS Point out to Spanish-speaking children the cognates related to the topic, such as naturaleza ( nature ), insecto ( insect ), animal ( animal ), and flor ( flower ).

TEXAS ESSENTIAL KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS 1.1C share information and ideas about topic/

TEXAS ESSENTIAL KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS 1.9B discuss rhyme, rhythm, repetition, alliteration; 1.12A dictate or compose literary texts, including personal narratives and poetry; ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY STANDARDS 1F use accessible language to learn new language

speak with appropriate pace/use conventions of language; 1.9B discuss rhyme, rhythm, repetition, alliteration; ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY STANDARDS 3G express opinions/ideas/feelings

W98

W99

WritingWorkshop

Poetry • Poem

THE READ LESSON 3

VOCABULARY

LESSON 4

Read the Story • Read Ask Me aloud. Have children recall some things the girl likes about nature and list them on the board. ( possible answers: geese, bugs, flowers ) Ask: Do you like these things, too? Why or why not? Have children Turn and Talk to a partner to answer. • Revisit the predictions list you created in the previous lesson. Together, correct or confirm predictions about the story. • Tell children that although Ask Me is a story, it has some poetic elements. Read the story again. Encourage children to look for words and other features that remind them of poetry. Stop at the following points to discuss. » On pages 1–3, ask children to look at the shape of the text. Ask: Do the words on these pages look like a story? Why or why not? ( No, because there are short lines and some are spread down the page. ) Explain that the spacing and length of the lines look more like poetry. » On page 14, ask: What words do you see more than once on this page? ( like, sand, really, digging, deep, down, seashells ) Explain that poets sometimes repeat words to make a beat, or rhythm . Share the word rhythm and its definition. Have children write the word in their Writer’s Vocabulary glossaries. Read the line “deep, deep, down, down in the sand.” Encourage children to clap to the beat. Pantomime steady digging while you read the line. » Share the word onomatopoeia and its definition. Have children write the word in their Writer’s Vocabulary glossaries. Explain that onomatopoeia helps readers “hear” the poem. Write examples of onomatopoeia on the board , such as buzz, hiss, whish, or beep . Choral read the words. Ask children to contribute other examples. » On page 17, ask: What kinds of words are splishing, sploshing, and splooshing? ( made up, onomatopoeic ) What do those words mean? How do you know? ( They sound like splashing in the rain, so they must mean something similar. )

Review the Focal Text • Use a two- column chart to brainstorm some nature nouns and action verbs with children. Record the nouns and verbs on the board or on chart paper. Explain that when the author puts these types of words together, such as “frogs swimming,” it helps us to see the action in our minds. • Have volunteers experiment with picking a noun and an action verb from each column and putting them together while another volunteer draws a picture on the board of the word pair. • Reread Ask Me . Ask children to listen for nature nouns and action words. • Pause periodically as you reread, adding words such as the following to a word bank: geese, swimming, hopping, insects, dragonflies, collected . Children may copy these words on Writer’s Notebook page 7.2 or in their notebooks. • Place children in small groups and distribute picture dictionaries. Assign one word from the word bank to each group. • Have each group read the definition aloud. Display the definitions on chart paper. Engage and Respond • Assign each group a word from the Word Bank. Encourage them to work together to think of as many words as possible that are associated with their word. • Distribute Writer’s Notebook page 7.3 and challenge children to write a short poem (three or four lines) about their word. Tell children they may write a rhyming or a free verse poem. Share the sample poem below.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Practice active listening and speaking skills. • Correct or confirm predictions about a text. • Share ideas and personal connections to a text. • Identify poetic elements, such as rhythm. • Language Respond to a text using domain-specific vocabulary. Focal Text Ask Me Anchor Chart W7: Elements of Poetry Online MATERIALS

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Identify words that help the reader visualize. • Use context clues to help determine word meanings. • Use a picture dictionary to find meanings of words. • Language Identify unfamiliar words and discuss their meanings. Focal Text Ask Me Writer’s Notebook pp. 7.2, 7.3 Classroommaterials picture dictionaries Online MATERIALS

WRITER’S VOCABULARY • rhythm: a regular beat in music, poetry, or dance • onomatopoeia: words that mimic, or copy, specific sounds

Geese flying high. Geese, geese, Hear their cry!

Engage and Respond • Display and review Anchor Chart W7: Elements of Poetry . • Place children in small groups to revisit the class poem and look for elements of rhythm and onomatopoeia. Have children brainstormways to add more of these elements to the class poem. Remind them to use appropriate speaking and listening skills, such as taking turns and looking at the speaker. • Ask volunteers to share their group’s ideas. Make changes to the class poem accordingly.

• Have groups share their short poems with the class.

ANCHOR CHART

Elements of Poetry

ENGLISH LEARNER SUPPORT: Build Vocabulary

BEGINNING

Message tells about a thing or place

Stanza a group of lines

Pantomime the meanings of words while completing the class word bank.

INTERMEDIATE

Encourage children to label drawings of the word bank words in their notebooks.

Sound Patterns alliteration: big brown bear rhyme: hop, stop, drop rhythm: one, two, buckle my shoe onomatopoeia: crash, bang, boom

Sensory Words sight, sound, smell, touch, and taste

ADVANCED/ADVANCED HIGH

Invite children to write a short sample sentence for each of the new words.

TEXAS ESSENTIAL KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS 1.1C share information and ideas about topic/

Message

TEXAS ESSENTIAL KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS 1.3A use picture dictionary/digital resource to find words; 1.3D identify/use words that name actions, directions, positions, sequences, categories, locations; 1.10D discuss author’s use of words that help the reader visualize; 1.12A dictate or compose literary texts, including personal narratives and poetry; ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY STANDARDS 2C learn new language structures/expressions/vocabulary

speak with appropriate pace/use conventions of language; 1.6E make connections to experiences/texts/ society; 1.7A describe personal connections to sources; 1.9B discuss rhyme, rhythm, repetition, alliteration; 1.10B discuss how text structure contributes to author’s purpose; ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY STANDARDS 1E internalize new basic/academic language

Stanza Sensory Word Sound Pattern

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PREWRITING I: FINDING A TOPIC LESSON 5

PREWRITING II: DEVELOPING A TOPIC

LESSON 6

Discuss the Writing Prompt • Show Display and Engage 7.3 . Read the writing prompt and discuss the tips. Encourage children to ask questions for clarification. • Explain that they will begin the writing

Make a Topic Choice • Have children return to Writer’s Notebook page 7.4 to review their word webs. Tell them that they will narrow down their topic choice by putting their topic ideas through a “test.” • Have children choose one topic from their webs. Write the following questions on the board and read them aloud.

DISPLAY AND ENGAGE

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Poem 7.3

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Analyze a writing prompt. • Use prewriting strategies to plan writing. • Language Brainstorm topic ideas based on prior knowledge. Display and Engage 7.3 Writer’s Notebook pp. 7.4, 7.5 Classroommaterials chart paper, markers Online MATERIALS

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Choose an idea for writing. • Develop ideas with details. • Language Identify new vocabulary for purposes of writing. Writer’s Notebook pp. 7.4, 7.6 Classroommaterials chart paper, markers Online MATERIALS

Writing Prompt

Write a poem about things you like in nature.

Tips • Brainstorm ideas about things you like in nature.

process for their poems by brainstorming topic ideas.

• Use rhyming words or free verse. • Use nature nouns and action verbs. • Draw pictures to illustrate your poem.

1. How does this topic make me feel? 2. What about this topic appeals to the senses? 3. What is important or unique about this topic?

Brainstorm Topics • Distribute copies of Writer’s

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Notebook page 7.4 or have children draw the word web in their notebooks.

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• Tell children that if they feel excited or curious to write about this topic, then they should choose to write about it. If they do not, then direct them to choose another topic and repeat the test. If children cannot give answers to these questions with any of their topics, then encourage them to choose a topic for which they can answer them. Plan Writing • Distribute copies of Writer’s Notebook page 7.6 or have children draw the Poem Planning chart in their notebooks. • Draw the chart on chart paper. Model completing the chart with information from the model text. THINK ALOUD I’ve chosen to write my poem about butterflies. For the first column, I will think about how butterflies make me feel and how I want my reader to feel. I feel happy and butterflies make me wonder, so I will write the words happy , joy , wonder . For the second column, I will think of words that use my senses when describing butterflies. I mostly see butterflies, so I’ll write the colors of butterflies, orange , brown , black , and yellow . Butterflies are quiet, so I will write that word. For the third column, I will think of words that describe how butterflies move. I will write fly , flutter , float . • Have children work independently to complete their charts. • Monitor children’s progress as they work. Ask volunteers to share their Poem Planning charts with the class.

• Tell children to write “I like . . .” in the center circle of their idea webs. Encourage them to look back over the observations they made in Lesson 2. Tell them they can also draw pictures of their favorite things in nature. • As they come up with topic ideas for their nature poem, have children write them in the circles of the web. • Model completing a word web on chart paper using the nature shown in Ask Me . • Have children Turn and Talk to a buddy to discuss their ideas. Have children work together to complete their word webs. Set Goals for Writing • Distribute copies of Writer’s Notebook page 7.5 or have children write goals in their notebooks. Point out that good writers set goals each time they write something new. • Read through the goals and assist children in determining which one should be their #1 goal.

LEARNING MINDSET: Noticing

Apply Ask children to practice picturing their poetry topics in their mind, noticing specific details about their subjects. Guide children to understand the value of looking closely at a subject and determining which details are most appealing. Paying attention to the things that make your topic special will help you to write a poem readers will enjoy.

ENGLISH LEARNER SUPPORT: Support Comprehension

BEGINNING

Allow children to complete the word web in their home language.

INTERMEDIATE

Have children use picture cards to help them plan their word webs before completing them.

ADVANCED/ADVANCED HIGH

ENGLISH LEARNER SUPPORT: Build Vocabulary

Hold brief individual conferences to check children’s understanding of the word web activity.

BEGINNING

Allow children to draw pictures of the actions and descriptions to complete their charts.

INTERMEDIATE

Provide children with a list of simple verbs and adjectives to help them complete the chart.

ADVANCED/ADVANCED HIGH

Challenge children to write –ing verbs for their actions.

TEXAS ESSENTIAL KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS 1.11A plan first draft/generate ideas for writing; 1.11B(ii) develop idea with specific/relevant details; ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY STANDARDS 2C learn new language structures/ expressions/vocabulary

TEXAS ESSENTIAL KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS 1.11A plan first draft/generate ideas for writing;

ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY STANDARDS 1A use prior knowledge/experiences

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DRAFTING I: ELEMENTS OF POETRY LESSON 7

DRAFTING II: CHOOSING THE RIGHT WORDS

LESSON 8

Introduce Poetic Forms • Show Display and Engage 7.4a and distribute copies of Writer’s Notebook page 7.7 to children. • Tell children that this is your rhyming poem about butterflies. Choral read the poem. Revisit the poem plan you composed on chart paper. Point out where you inserted words from the chart into the poem. • Have children annotate the poem as you direct them. Say: Let’s first write a

Investigate Sound • Tell children that while drafting their poems, they should pay close attention to the words that they use. Say: You need to make every word count in order to make a strong poem.

DISPLAY AND ENGAGE

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Poem 7.4a

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Analyze the structure of a poem. • Compose a draft of a poem. • Language Identify key components of poetry. Display and Engage 7.4a–7.4b Writer’s Notebook pp. 7.6, 7.7, 7.8, 7.9 Anchor Chart W7: Elements of Poetry Online MATERIALS

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Use poetic language. • Develop a draft of a poem and add details. • Language Write a poemwith complex structures. MATERIALS Display and Engage 7.4a–7.4b Writer’s Notebook pp. 7.2, 7.10 Online

Butterflies Flutter in the wind Float in the sky, Quiet dance Catch my eye. Orange and brown, Yellow and black, Find a flower, Eat a snack!

• Explain that when choosing words, children should think about how the poemwill sound when read aloud. If a poem does not have rhythm or interesting words, it might not be enjoyable to hear. • Show Display and Engage 7.4a . Review the elements of sound in the poem. Read it aloud and snap your fingers to the slow, steady rhythm. Ask a volunteer to point out the rhyming words and an example of onomatopoeia. ( flutter ) • Explain that another aspect of sound is repeating letter sounds. Ask: What sounds do you hear repeated? ( the fl- in flutter and fly , the b- in brown and black) • Show the model poem on Display and Engage 7.4b . Read it aloud. Ask: What sound do you hear repeated in this poem? Where? ( the fl- in fluttering, flittering, fleeting) • Point out that while the cinquain

DISPLAY AND ENGAGE

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Poem 7.4a

Butterflies Flutter in the wind Float in the sky, Quiet dance Catch my eye. Orange and brown, Yellow and black, Find a flower, Eat a snack!

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number by each line. Count 1–8. In this poem, I rhymed the last word in line 2 with the last word in line 4. Let’s underline the words that rhyme, sky and eye . I also rhymed the last word in line 6 with the last word in line 8, so let’s underline black and snack . You can rhyme all the words in your poem or just a few, like I did. • Show Display and Engage 7.4b and distribute copies of Writer’s Notebook pages 7.8–7.9 to children.

LEARNING MINDSET: Noticing

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Apply Tell children that noticing the sounds words make can help themwrite more interesting poetry. Encourage them to notice the sounds in their poetry by reading their drafts aloud to themselves.

DISPLAY AND ENGAGE

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• Tell children that this poem is called a cinquain . A cinquain uses specific types of words. Have children annotate the poem as you direct them. Say: The first word, Butterflies , should be the topic of

Poem 7.4b

DISPLAY AND ENGAGE

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Butterflies Butterflies Orange, yellow Fluttering, flittering, fleeting Jewels of the fall Monarchs

Poem 7.4b

the poem. The second two words, orange and yellow , are describing words about butterflies. Fluttering , flittering , fleeting are three action words using –ing. Jewels of the fall is a phrase, or a few words that describe the topic. You might write a phrase about how your topic makes you feel or what you think of your topic. The last word is another noun that means the same thing as your topic. • Tell children that they may use these models to help themwrite their own poems, or they may choose their own style. Begin to Draft • Display Anchor Chart W7: Elements of Poetry as a review of poetry elements. Have children use their planning chart on Writer’s Notebook page 7.6 and the models to begin drafting their poems in their notebooks. Butterflies Butterflies Orange, yellow Fluttering, flittering, fleeting Jewels of the fall Monarchs Grade 1 | WritingWorkshop 1re_de_wr_07_poem.indd 5

TEACHER TIP Allow children to experiment with

multiple poetic forms. Provide themwith mentor poems to study and emulate the different forms in their writing.

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poem does not have a regular rhythm like the rhyming poem does, it creates a beat. The shorter words in the second line have two strong beats, and the third line has three swinging beats. Motion with your hand, like a conductor, two motions downward for the strong beats and three motions swinging a hand back and forth while you read the lines aloud. Experiment with Sound • Invite children to experiment with sound in their poetry. Have them brainstorm words that create rhythm on Writer’s Notebook page 7.10 or in their notebooks. They may also refer to their word banks on Writer’s Notebook page 7.2 for ideas. Then encourage them to insert sound words into their drafts. Circulate the room, offering assistance.

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ENGLISH LEARNER SUPPORT: Scaffold Writing

TEXAS ESSENTIAL KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS 1.6D create mental images; 1.9B discuss rhyme, rhythm, repetition, alliteration; 1.11B(i) organize with structure; 1.11B(ii) develop idea with specific/relevant details; 1.12A dictate/ compose literary texts; ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY STANDARDS 1E internalize new basic/ academic language; 5G narrate/describe/explain in writing

BEGINNING

Encourage children to write in free verse if producing rhyming words appears difficult.

TEXAS ESSENTIAL KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS 1.11B(i) organize with structure; 1.11B(ii) develop idea with specific/relevant details; 1.12A dictate/compose literary texts; ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY STANDARDS 5E employ increasingly complex grammatical structures in writing

INTERMEDIATE

Supply children with word endings to make rhyming words.

ADVANCED/ADVANCED HIGH

Encourage children to create a rhythm by repeating entire words in their poems.

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REVISING I: WORD CHOICE LESSON 9

REVISING II: GROUPING

LESSON 10

Balance Sound and Meaning • Write the following sentence frame on the board: The rain is falling to the ground . Ask: Who can tell me what this sentence means? (It means the rain is falling from the sky to the ground.) What if I changed it like this? Cross out falling and write dancing . Read the new sentence aloud: The rain is dancing to the ground. • Ask: Howmight rain dance to the ground? What feeling does the word capture? How is it different from falling ? • Cross out dancing and write stomping . Ask: How does changing the word change the feeling of the sentence? How is it different from dancing ? • Point out that sometimes unexpected words can create clear and wonderful new meanings in otherwise plain sentences. • Write: The rain is reading to the ground . Ask: What does this sentence mean? (It’s nonsense.) Point out that not every word will create meaning. Say: Sometimes unexpected words take away meaning from a sentence. We have to balance between words that convey unexpected meaning and words that make no sense. • Have the children suggest other words to put in the sentence and have them discuss how the meaning changes. Write suggestions on the board or chart paper. • Say: We also want to be sure that the words we use create the rhythmwe want . Point out how different words create different rhythms. Read the following two sentences: The rain is coming down. The rain is splish-splash-splooshing . • Have children compare and contrast the sound patterns in these sentences. Ask: How does the pattern affect the meaning of the sentence? Begin to Revise • Have children revisit their poems for word choice. Circulate the room to assist children during the process. • Encourage children to whisper-read their drafts. When reading their drafts, children will begin to notice the natural groupings of words and the sounds the words make when placed next to each other. Remind children that the words can be rearranged, changed, or omitted to sound better when read aloud. • Have children cross out in light pencil rather than erase when revising. Crossing out words allows them to return words more easily after rearranging or considering alternatives.

Small Group Conferences • Use the Highlighting strategy to help children give constructive feedback in a group setting. Highlighting provides verbal and visual feedback. It enables the writer to understand what listeners find outstanding and effective. • Tell children they will help each other make their poems better by working together in small groups. • Divide children into small groups of four. Remind children to bring a highlighter or colored marker to the group. • Have children follow these directions for the activity: 1. Writers read one time while the listeners listen. 2. Writers read again. During the second reading, listeners write down one thing they would like to hear more of, such as rhythm, sound words, or words that use the senses. 3. After reading, listeners will take turns sharing their notes and asking questions. The writer will highlight the parts of their poem that listeners like and take notes about things the listeners want to hear more of. contact, staying quiet, and paying attention to the poem. Review good speaking skills, such as reading at an appropriate pace, using a loud voice, and reading with expression. • Allow groups enough time for each writer to take a turn reading his or her poem and receiving feedback. Continue to Revise • Allow children to revise using the feedback they gained in the small group conferences. They may use the checklist on Writer’s Notebook page 7.11 to guide their revisions. • Circulate the room. Encourage children to ask questions regarding their approach to revisions or the revisions themselves. ENGLISH LEARNER SUPPORT: Support Listening ALL LEVELS Provide childrenwith a photocopy of the other children’s poems so theymay followalong while the poems are read aloud. Children can circle unfamiliar words and ask for clarification froma partner. Grade 1 | WritingWorkshop 1re_de_wr_07_poem.indd 6 DISPLAY AND ENGAGE Listen for: • nature words • rhythm or sound words • “sense” words • rhyme (for rhyming poems) Listening DONOTEDIT--Changesmustbemade through“File info” CorrectionKey=NL-A • Show Display and Engage 7.5 . Read through the features children should listen for while their classmates read their poems. • Review habits of a good listener with children, including maintaining eye

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Revise poems for word choice. • Language Justify word choice. Classroommaterials chart paper, markers Online MATERIALS

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Practice active listening and speaking while giving feedback. • Participate in small group discussions. • Language Use printed text to support listening. Display and Engage 7.5 Classroommaterials highlighters or markers Writer’s Notebook p. 7.11 Online MATERIALS

TARGETED GRAMMAR SUPPORT

You may want to consult the following grammar minilessons to review key revising topics. • 3.1.3 Using ActionWords, p. W288 • 3.1.5 Connect toWriting: Using Action Verbs, p. W290 • 4.4.3 Using the Right Adjective, p. W323

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TEXAS ESSENTIAL KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS 1.1A listen actively/ask and answer questions;

1.1C share information and ideas about topic/speak with appropriate pace/use conventions of language; 1.1D work collaboratively by following rules for discussion; ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY STANDARDS 2E use support to enhance/confirm understanding of spoken language

TEXAS ESSENTIAL KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS 1.11C revise drafts by adding details; ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY STANDARDS 5G narrate/ describe/explain in writing

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