Emery Law Office September 2018

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AWORKING MOM’S STORY 1 INSIDE

3 TIPS TO HELP ORGANIZE YOUR CRAZY LIFE SPOTLIGHT ON STEVE DAMRON 2 BABY ZOEY! INSIDE-OUT GRILLED HAM AND CHEESE 3

WHY LABOR DAY IS INDEBTED TO THE PULLMAN STRIKE 4

HOW A RAILROAD PROTEST LAID THE FOUNDATION FOR A NATIONAL HOLIDAY THE PULLMAN STRIKE AND THE ORIGIN OF LABOR DAY

T oday, Labor Day mostly means a day off and the closure of public pools. But when it was first created, it was a president’s desperate attempt to curb the tension after one of the most violent strike breakups in American history. In the late 19th century, the workers of the Pullman Company, which manufactured luxury train cars, all lived in a company-owned town. George Pullman, the owner, lived in a mansion overlooking houses, apartments, and crammed-together barracks, all of which were rented by the thousands of workers needed for the operation. For some time, the town operated without a hitch, providing decent wages for the workers while netting the higher-ups millions of dollars. But after the economic depression of the 1890s brought the country to its knees, everything changed. George Pullman slashed his workers’ wages by nearly 30 percent, but he neglected to adjust the rent on the company-owned buildings in

turn. As a result, life became untenable in the town, with workers struggling to maintain the barest standards of living for themselves and their families.

In response, the workers began a strike on May 11, 1894. As the event ramped up, it gained the support of the powerful American Railway Union (ARU). But Pullman, stubborn as he was, barely acknowledged the strike was happening, and he refused to meet with the organizers. The tension increased when Eugene Debs, the president of the American Railway Union, organized a boycott of all trains that included Pullman cars. The strike continued to escalate until workers and Pullman community members managed to stop the trains from running. Eventually, President Grover Cleveland sent in soldiers to break up the strike. Violence ensued, with soldiers making a great effort to quell the strike at its core. By the time the violence ended, 30 people had lost their lives and an estimated $80 million in damages had been caused throughout the town. A few months later, President Grover Cleveland declared Labor Day a federal holiday. Many experts believe that this act was an effort to build rapport among his pro-labor constituents after handling the incident so poorly.

This month, as you fire up the barbecue and enjoy your day off, take a moment to remember the workers who fought for labor rights in our country.

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