Foust Law Office October 2019

Foust Law Office

PRST STD US POSTAGE PAID BOISE, ID PERMIT 411

www.lucasfoustlaw.com 406-587-3720 Fax: 406-879-4400

3390 South 30th Avenue Bozeman, MT 59718

INSIDE THIS ISSUE Do You Know the #1 Rule When Buying a Used Car? PAGE 1 Reasons to Adopt Dogs From Shelters PAGE 2 Grave Matters of the Law PAGE 2 Frightful Films for Families PAGE 3 Take a Break PAGE 3 Miso Caramel Apples PAGE 3 Educating Your Kids About Cancer PAGE 4

SOLUTION

A DIFFICULT DISCUSSION Talking to Your Kids About Cancer As pink-clad products line store shelves this October in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, children are bound to be curious. Since they rationalize the world around them with what they already know, kids may ask silly questions like, “Is cancer contagious?”Whether you or a loved one has been diagnosed with cancer or you just feel it’s time to educate your children about the disease, answering questions can be difficult. These tips can help you prepare. ALWAYS TELL THE TRUTH Telling a child that you or a loved one has cancer can be complicated. To start, the American Cancer Society (ACS) recommends giving yourself time after hearing the news of a cancer diagnosis to process this new reality. Two-parent households should tell their children together, while single parents are encouraged to ask an adult with a positive influence on the child’s life to join the conversation. Remember, your child will be experiencing the same emotions as you but in a kid’s body, where hormones and developmental changes are already wreaking havoc. Monitor their emotions and offer them space and opportunities to discuss their feelings with a professional.

while older kids may need more comprehensive answers to their questions. A 5-year-old is going to have different concerns than a 16-year-old, so your approach must be different. However, regardless of your child’s age, always tell the truth. FOCUS ON PREVENTION EDUCATION A loved one doesn’t have to be diagnosed with cancer for you to educate your family about the disease and its prevention. Studies have linked prevention efforts, including anti-smoking campaigns and healthy lifestyle programs, to actually preventing cancer. (In fact, half of all cancers can be prevented!) Teach your child about the dangers of tobacco, alcohol, and excessive sun exposure to foster healthy habits and lifestyles. Organizations that host walks, benefits, and other events for cancer prevention and research can be great sources of education for families, too.

When it comes to explaining the disease and its consequences, younger children may require fewer details and broader concepts,

The ACS has resources for families living with cancer or those wanting to learn more. Visit Cancer.org for more information.

4 • www.lucasfoustlaw.com

Published by The Newsletter Pro • www.newsletterpro.com

www.lucasfoustlaw.com

Made with FlippingBook - professional solution for displaying marketing and sales documents online