Counter Intelligence Issue 01

CASE STUDY: THE RISE OF

WORDS: ROSEANNA ROBERTS

Pink, a color that was once thought of as the quintessential mark of femininity, now represents something quite different in 2017. Beginning in fashion and then quickly adapted by beauty, pink has been reclaimed by women as a modern representation of female strength, repositioning the former ditzy association with the ladylike hue. Women now wear a bold fuchsia lip or pale pink pantsuit as a symbol of female strength. This shift in rosy outlook has been in the works for some time. Over the past decade, the role of women has seen significant change. Women have asserted their position in the workforce (and beyond), becoming confident in their identity, celebrating individuality and creative spirit. Strong female role models, from Beyoncé to Hillary Clinton, have encouraged women to lead as women, celebrating the differences from their male counterparts. Instead of rejecting classically feminine colors, they have been embraced. Over the years brands have used the color to appeal to the female demographic — imbuing it with meaning. The cosmetics magnate Mary

Kay empowered women to enter the workforce on their own terms, and rewarded hard work by gifting top performers with blush-pink Cadillacs. Fast-forward to 2017, where “millennial pink” is representative of a “post pretty” movement ruled by ironic, honest beauty. Indie cosmetics darling Glossier is the poster child, wielding the color like a product itself. As businesses start to gain a conscience and align themselves with social movements, pink continues to be a beacon of female strength. Social justice-driven brand The Lipstick Lobby donates 100% of net profits from the sale of their signature shade, Kiss My Pink, to Planned Parenthood. The high-impact color brings attention to the cause, while at the same time being a fresh and flattering tone on the lips. Like kale and avocado toast, pink is currently having a moment. It is yet to be seen what lies ahead for the hue, but it is safe to say that it is no longer just a color, but a symbol of the modern woman — whether she’s wearing makeup or is au naturel. ✹

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Counter Intelligence

Counter Intelligence

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