Campus Commons PT - May 2020

CAMPUS COMMONS

AND SOME UPDATES ON HOWOUR CLINIC IS HANDLING THE CURRENT HEALTH CRISIS WHY A GOOD PT CLINIC IS LIKE A HAMBURGER

In the midst of all this uncertainty regarding the spread of COVID-19, events like National Hamburger Month and summertime barbecues probably don’t seem very important. I don’t know if we’ll be able to have barbecues by the time you all read this article although I hope we can. There’s nothing quite like a summer burger fresh off the grill. When I think of my ideal burger, I know one thing for sure: It has to have some good old- fashioned American cheese on it. I’ll also take lettuce, tomatoes, and maybe some bacon on it, along with a little mustard, although I don’t like a lot of sauce on my burgers. Too much sauce means you can’t taste the meat, which is the whole point of a good burger. In my opinion, the best tasting burgers are grilled on a barbecue, medium-done with just a little pink in the middle to give it some flavor. I also like sprinkling some salt, pepper, and garlic on the meat before cooking my burgers. While this is my picture of an ideal burger, it’s not the perfect burger for everyone. There are 1001 ways to make a burger, and they all have their fans. When it comes to physical therapy clinics, you could say something similar. Just because we at Campus Commons PT treat our patients or implement practices one way doesn’t mean the physical therapy clinic down

the street does things the same way. However, just like with my favorite burger, I have a philosophy and a way of running Campus Commons PT that I’ve found works very well for our patients. In general, two of the most important “ingredients” we’ve incorporated into our clinic have been our consistency and our attention to detail. Take how we’re responding to our world’s current health crisis. We want to stay consistent with our patients, so we’re keeping our doors open, albeit while abiding by CDC guidelines. However, we also want our staff and patients to be aware of the latest details surrounding the coronavirus, so we regularly implement new guidelines as we receive new information. In past workshops we’ve done, I’ve used a metaphor about pizza and pizza places. There are 100 different pizza places, and while all pizza is pretty good, for some reason “I DON’T KNOW IF WE’LL BE ABLE TO HAVE BARBECUES BY THE TIME YOU ALL READ THIS ARTICLE ALTHOUGH I HOPE WE CAN. THERE’S NOTHING QUITE LIKE A SUMMER BURGER FRESH OFF THE GRILL.”

or another, you probably prefer a few pizza places over the rest. The same could be said for burgers and physical therapy clinics. With that in mind, how do we let our patients know we’ve got the best “burgers” around? One way is by going the extra mile to stay connected with all of you. I don’t know if very many physical therapy clinics make the effort to stay connected to their patients, whether through email or through a newsletter, and in this day and age, staying connected to others is definitely something we want to prioritize. Before I sign off, I want to wish all of you well and let you know I hope you and your families are safe and healthy during this uncertain season. Take care!

–Mark Eddy

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HEALTH BENEFITS OF FAMILY GARDENING GIVE YOUR KID THE GIFT OF A GREEN THUMB

Yes, there will always be football season, basketball season, and soccer season, but right now, it’s gardening season. That means it’s time to roll up your sleeves and play in the dirt. If you’ve been searching for a way to get the kids away from technology and engaged with the real world, gardening is the perfect activity for the whole family to enjoy. Not only is it fun, but it’s also beneficial for your kids’ development. For example, gardening can improve your children’s analytical abilities. As Dr. Wendy Matthews says, “Gardening exercises important reasoning, initiation, planning, and organization skills.” Furthermore, several studies, including one at Texas A&M University, suggest that gardening improves a child’s attitude toward fruits and vegetables and may make them more

likely to choose them as snacks. Gardening helps kids identify with where their food is coming from, and nothing tastes better than a freshly picked strawberry or pea pod they grew themselves. Jack Gilbert, a scientist at the University of Chicago and a parent himself, and his co-author, Rob Knight, emphasize the health benefits of garden time in their book, “Dirt Is Good: The Advantage of Germs for Your Child’s Developing Immune System.” The two found that exposure to different microbes, like those found in a garden, strengthens a child’s immune system and makes them less likely to develop allergies. If this is your first time gardening, you don’t need much to get started. Grab a few shovels, a pair of gloves for each family member, and fresh potting soil, and you’ll be set. Then, you can decide together which plants you’d like to grow! Carrots are fun because of the surprise factor — just imagine your child discovering that the part they eat grows below the ground! Peas are tasty and fairly easy to grow, as are strawberries. The options really are endless. Depending on the growing season in your area, you can choose to buy seeds or opt for rooted plants.

Last but certainly not least, the best part of gardening as a family is the healthy, fresh produce you’ll get to enjoy all summer long!

ABOUT HOWOUR CLINIC IS RESPONDING TO THE CORONAVIRUS A FEW THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW

At Campus Commons PT, the health and safety of our patients have always been our top priority. Since the outbreak of COVID-19 in our community, that priority hasn’t changed, but exactly how we go about keeping you healthy and safe has changed. We don’t know how the situation with the coronavirus will have changed by the time you read this, but we’re going to try and stay open for as long as possible. With that said, we think you should know a few things.

your hands before and after each treatment as well as after touching any paperwork, equipment, or other surfaces.

YOU SHOULD STAY HOME IF YOU FEEL SICK.

If you have shortness of breath, a cough, or a fever, do not come into the clinic for your regularly scheduled appointment. Stay at home and give our office a call to let us know you can’t come in. Wait until 24 hours after your fever has subsided to think about coming into the office. In most cases, you should not be charged a cancellation fee if you can’t make it for reasons related to the coronavirus. If you have any other questions about your appointment or how our clinic is staying safe and operating in the midst of this uncertainty, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at 916-927-1333.

WE’RE MAKING CAMPUS COMMONS PT AS SAFE AS POSSIBLE.

You might be wondering what we’re doing to make our clinic safe since we’re trying to stay open. To start, we’ve intensified our regular disinfecting procedures of regularly touched surfaces. At the same time, our team is also keeping up to date on the latest developments regarding the coronavirus from trusted sources, such as the CDC and OSHA websites. Even still, we recommend that all of you wash or sanitize

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WHYYOU SHOULDN’TWAIT TO GET PHYSICAL THERAPY 3 REASONS WAITING COULD HURT IN THE LONG RUN

Everyone who is doing their part to practice social distancing during the ongoing pandemic should absolutely be commended for their efforts. However, if you are injured and need to see a physical therapist, you should not put off treatment until after the pandemic. While social distancing is important, waiting too long to see a physical therapist about an injury is very risky for a few key reasons.

sometimes, injuries treated early on may heal completely with just physical therapy; waiting may make the injury worse, which may require surgery, a much more expensive treatment.

YOU COULD PUT YOURSELF AT A DISADVANTAGE.

Hopefully, within the next month or so, things will get back to normal, and we’ll all be able to get back to the activities we love. However, that might not be possible for you if you’re still recovering from an injury. We want you to get back out and enjoy life as soon as it’s safe, which is why you should get physical therapy now. As we said before, if you’re sick at all, you should prioritize recovering from your sickness before recovering from a musculoskeletal injury. However, once you know you’re healthy, come into Campus Commons PT, so you can get back to doing what you love as soon as this season of social isolation ends. We are taking all the appropriate precautions to disinfect and sanitize our clinic so you’ll stay safe and healthy.

YOUR INJURY COULD GET WORSE.

Just like you want to treat an open wound before it gets infected, you want to treat a musculoskeletal injury before the muscle tissue around the injury begins to atrophy. Research has shown that muscle atrophy and nerve changes can occur around the injury site just 24 hours after the injury. If you start physical therapy as soon as possible, you’ll minimize the damage and the recovery process will go much faster.

YOU COULD LOSE MONEY IN THE LONG RUN.

Getting a few physical therapy sessions out of the way right after your injury will leave a much smaller dent in your wallet than if you wait until the injury becomes more serious. Not only that but

TAKE A BREAK

SPRINGTIME CACIO E PEPE

Inspired by Eating Well

INGREDIENTS

• •

6 oz multigrain spaghetti 8 oz fresh asparagus, cut into 1-inch pieces

• • • •

1 tsp lemon zest

1/2 cup Parmesan cheese, grated

1/2 tsp black pepper 1 cup baby arugula

1 tbsp olive oil

DIRECTIONS

1. Heat oven to 425 F. 2. In a large pot, cook spaghetti until al dente. Reserve 1 cup of water before draining and put spaghetti in a covered pot to keep warm. 3. Line a 15x10-inch baking pan with foil and toss in asparagus and olive oil. 4. Cook asparagus for 5–7 minutes and sprinkle with lemon zest. 5. Add 3/4 cup of the reserved water, Parmesan cheese, and pepper to the spaghetti. Stir until creamy. 6. Toss in asparagus and arugula before serving.

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425 University Ave. #140 Sacramento, CA 95757

INSIDE

THIS ISSUE

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Hamburgers, PT, and the Coronavirus

What Is Gardening Good For?

How Our Clinic Is Responding to the Coronavirus

Why You Shouldn’t Wait to Get Physical Therapy

Springtime Cacio e Pepe

Bird-Watching for Beginners

n g WHY MAY IS THE BEST MONTH TO START

Bird-watching is like a lifelong scavenger hunt that you can play anywhere on Earth. The activity provides a mixture of science, travel, and beauty, and it’s a chance to get outside for feathered adventures and quiet reflection. The month of May is a great time of year to go birding because rising temperatures prompt spring migration. So if you’re eager to begin bird-watching, there’s no better time than now. Here are some tips to get started.

live. From there, it’s easy to pick your first spotting goal. You can even get yourself extra excited by watching a few bird documentaries.

GEAR UP

One of the best things about birding is that you don’t need a lot of equipment to do it. As long as you’ve got your field guide and comfortable walking shoes, the only other thing you’ll need is a pair of binoculars. And they don’t have to be fancy. As long as they can zoom in on faraway trees and perches, they’ll work for now. You can always upgrade later.

home in on a single bird and go find it. It may be local, or you can plan a trip to a specific bird’s natural habitat. Stay focused and don’t get distracted by other species. The thrill that comes with spotting your first bird will keep you coming back to find the rest. Bird-watching is a wonderful hobby because it’s easy to get started and can last a lifetime. As long as you can walk, drive, or look out a window, you can be a birder. So what are you waiting for? Get out there and find some birds!

EDUCATE YOURSELF

Thousands of species of birds span all corners of the globe. That’s why finding them is an exciting prospect — there’s no end to the hunt! Start by researching birds that are native to your location. Purchase a field guide with pictures of each bird and maps of their range and use it to figure out where different birds

GO EXPLORING

Your very first birding excursion is important because you don’t want to be overwhelmed or underwhelmed. So use your field guide to

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