Curriculum Studies Guide 2019

CurriculumStudies Guide 2019

CANTERBURY Each boy at his best.

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Christ’s College Canterbury

Introduction

Choosing subjects for the following year is an important process because of the implications for future subject choices and possible careers. It is vital that parents and students are well- informed about subject choices, qualifications and careers. The Curriculum Studies Guide will assist parents and students to plan an appropriate course at each year level. The number of optional subjects increases as students progress toward Year 13. Choosing the best combination of subjects can pose difficult questions. This guide should answer most questions so that subject choices are based on accurate and reliable information enabling each student to be better prepared for his future career. If you require further advice, please do not hesitate to contact your son’s Housemaster, Mr Sellars (Careers Adviser) or Mr Eccleton (Assistant Principal - Curriculum). Mr Joe Eccleton Assistant Principal - Curriculum

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Curriculum Studies Guide 2019

Heads of Department

Art Darryn W George dgeorge@christscollege.com

Art History Robyn Peers rpeers@christscollege.com

Assistant Principal - Curriculum Joe Eccleton jeccleton@christscollege.com

Biology Dr Graeme Swanson gswanson@christscollege.com

Chemistry Scott Franklin sfranklin@christscollege.com

Careers Advisor Chris Sellars csellars@christscollege.com

Classical Studies Chloe Harland charland@christscollege.com

Commerce Katie Southworth ksouthworth@christscollege.com

English Sian Evans sevans@christscollege.com

Drama David Chambers dchambers@christscollege.com

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Christ’s College Canterbury

Geography Peter Cooper pcooper@christscollege.com

General Science Callum Bell cbell@christscollege.com

History Warren Lidstone wlidstone@christscollege.com

Mathematics Samantha Squire ssquire@christscollege.com

Media Studies Peter Hewson phewson@christscollege.com

Modern Languages Susan Harding sharding@christscollege.com

Music Robert Aburn raburn@christscollege.com

Physical Education/Health Chris Needle cneedle@christscollege.com

Physics David Newton dnewton@christscollege.com

Design & Technology Eloise Nevin enevin@christscollege.com

Religious Education Rev. Bosco Peters bpeters@christscollege.com

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Curriculum Studies Guide 2019

Table of Contents

7 Curriculum and Qualifications 9 Career Planning

10 Vocational Pathways 12 Curriculum Overview 13 Year 9 / Year 10 Overview 14 Year 11 / Year 12 / Year 13 Overview 16 Entering options online 16 Subject choices / Login details Subject Information: 19 Agribusiness 20 Art 24 Art History 26 Biology 30 Chemistry 35 Classical Studies 36 Commerce – Accounting – Economics – Financial Literacy 40 Design & Visual Communications 45 Digital Technologies

48 Drama 53 English 56 Geography 60 History

65 Mathematics 69 Media Studies 72 Modern Languages 79 Te Reo and Tikanga Maori 80 Music 85 Physical Education, Health & Wellbeing

89 Physics 92 Religion 95 Science 99 Technology

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Christ’s College Canterbury

Curriculum and Qualifications

The New Zealand Curriculum Framework, published in 1993, describes the structure for the New Zealand Curriculum. It defines eight essential learning areas —Health and Physical Education, The Arts, Social Sciences, Technology, Science, Mathematics, Language, and Languages. It also describes five key competencies, some of which are woven into the courses that schools teach. Others form an implicit part of daily life at College. The five key competencies are Thinking; Using language, Symbols and Text; Managing Self; Relating to Others; and Participating and Contributing. These elements are now considered to be fundamental to teaching and learning in New Zealand schools. Accompanying the framework are curriculum statements for each of the essential learning areas. The New Zealand Curriculum impacts in the classroom in the form of teaching and assessment strategies aimed at developing and assessing a wider range of skills than in the past. This also has implications for the structure of reports to parents and students. Assessment towards qualifications in the senior school takes the form of the National Certificate in Educational Achievement (NCEA). The qualification is based mainly around achievement standards that are worth a number of credits. Students will need to achieve at least 80 credits overall to receive the certificate at each level. NCEA is awarded at three levels based on the subjects in Year 11-13. A normal course in a subject at a particular year level may be worth up to 24 credits if all standards are gained. Credits gained through unit standards will also contribute to NCEA. Scholarship is an award, not a qualification, and is gained by external examinations. It aims to identify and recognise academic excellence.

NATIONAL QUALIFICATIONS Christ’s College will continue to prepare students for examinations that lead to national New Zealand qualifications. In 2019, the Year 11, 12 and 13 qualifications will be NCEA Levels 1, 2 and 3 respectively. More specific details relating to each subject are included in the subject descriptions. Further information about the NCEA is available on the internet at www.nzqa.govt.nz/ ncea. INTERNAL EXAMINATIONS Experience in examination techniques is vital for anyone contemplating tertiary study. All students sit papers internally, partly as practice and partly as a formative component of their course. Most year groups will sit at least one formal examination each year. EXTERNAL EXAMINATIONS Year 10 A limited number of students may be invited to sit NCEA Level 1 Mathematics in Year 10. Year 11 In Year 11, all students choose to study six subjects for NCEA. College requires all students to enter in English and Mathematics. Students intending to continue with a Modern Language in Year 12 must have taken the subject in Year 11. Most other subjects may be started at Year 12. For some subjects, a Year 11 course is recommended preparation. The external examination papers are sat in November and most will last three hours. After marking and processing, results are published in January. These are expressed in terms of the grades and number of credits achieved in each subject. For NCEA the grades are Not Achieved, Achieved, Merit and Excellence. In some subjects, the maximum number of credits possible is 20.

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Curriculum Studies Guide 2019

Year 12 In Year 12, students study six subjects. These will be assessed using NCEA achievement standards or unit standards. Most courses involve a formal written examination in November. Year 13 Like Levels 1 and 2, 80 credits are required to gain the Year 13 Level 3 certificate. However, 20 credits are carried over from Level 2. Entry into Year 13 subjects is not automatic and will depend upon a students performance the previous year. Scholarship is a separate examination assessing a higher level of understanding and application of knowledge from the Level 3 curriculum. Questions regarding examination entries or regulations should be addressed to Mr Eccleton, Assistant Principal – Curriculum. Students will qualify for entrance into a New Zealand university if they have obtained a minimum of 60 credits at Level 3 or higher, including a minimum of 14 credits at Level 3 in each of three subjects, and they have gained Level 3 NCEA. There is also the requirement of: - a minimum 10 credits at Level 1 or higher in Mathematics for numeracy; - a minimum 10 credits at Level 2 or higher for literacy; 5 credits must be in reading and 5 credits must be in writing, and these credits can come from a range of subjects. ENTRANCE TO UNIVERSITY Gaining entrance to university: NCEA qualifications

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Christ’s College Canterbury

Career Planning In planning a career, the main emphasis in career guidance is on helping individuals to make their own career decisions based on a true understanding of their abilities, skills, interests, work values and personality, and on the options open to them. Since people today more frequently face ongoing, successive work and study transitions, and career changes and developments, such an approach also aims at equipping them with career-planning skills to face decisions in the future. Career guidance is not therefore simply based on the concept of matching people and jobs. The process involves these steps: (A) Assess yourself – the internal factors 1. Abilities 2. Occupational values, e.g. status, security, challenge, creativity, independence, team work, location 3. Interests - personal/vocational (possible career fields) 4. Skills (practised abilities): – – Thinking/creative/problem solving – – Communication/interpersonal – – Business & management

(C) Internal factors + external influences + job criteria = suitability (D) Research and generate several career options for evaluation Generally, the more people learn about themselves and the occupational world, the better and more informed their career decisions will be. Consequently, students must realise that career planning requires their time and personal effort in: 1. Assessing their abilities, work values, interests, skills and personality. 2. Use of the resources of the Careers Room to gather information and ideas. 3. Consultation and discussion with the Careers Adviser, teachers, parents and friends. 4. Visits to tertiary institutions. 5. Contact with people in the workplace for further discussion, information and work experience. The process should begin at the very least in Year 9 with students developing a career plan. Planning and decision-making should not be left until the third term of Year 13, as some polytechnic courses close in August and halls of residence applications are due by 1 October. The Careers Room is very well resourced with information and is open every school day from 8.30am - 4.00pm for students to research their career interests and receive appropriate help from Mr Sellars, the Careers Adviser.

– – Numerical – – Language

– – Technological/computer – – Information & research – – Ability to keep on learning and adapting

5. Personality and character

(B) Consider the external influences 1. Family expectations and pressures 2. Peer group pressure 3. Media images of the occupation 4. School subjects and marks required 5. Lifestyle requirements 6. Culture and religion 7. Work experience (job requirements, work environment, occupational characteristics) 8. Job availability

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Vocational Pathways

Vocational Pathways is a programme designed by the Ministry of Education offering a new way to look at Level 2 NCEA and beyond. It offers a vocational lens that allows students to plan their courses around progression into one of six different employment sectors. These sectors are:

The Ministry describes Vocational pathways in this way: “To receive a Vocational Pathways Award, students must first gain NCEA Level 2, which is 60 credits from Level 2 and 20 credits from any other level; 80 credits in total. 10 of these 80 credits must satisfy the literacy requirements, and 10 of these 80 credits must satisfy the numeracy requirements. To get a Vocational Pathways Award, 60 of the Level 2 credits must be from the recommended standards in one or more pathways, including 20 Level 2 credits from sector related standards.” These sector-related standards are specific standards defined by the various industry training organisations as preparing a student for progression in that specific industry. Students are able to track their progression towards any specific VP via the Youth Guarantee website. More information can be found here: http://youthguarantee.net.nz/vocational- pathways/ The site also offers a Profile Builder function in which boys can determine how their courses are preparing them for any specific sector, and data under the title Occupational Outlook in which they can view predicted employment possibilities in a range of employment fields over the next 12 months. There is an excellent app available free from the iTunes store that offers quick easy access to this data.

• Primary Industries • Services Industries

• Social & Community Services • Manufacturing & Technology • Construction & Infrastructure • Creative Industries

Source: http://youthguarantee.net.nz/vocational- pathways/

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Christ’s College Canterbury

opportunities. Note should also be taken of the importance of foreign language fluency, in such growth areas as commerce, industry, trade and tourism. In summary, option choice is determined by an evaluation of: a) previous years’ study b) possible future career needs c) necessity for future career flexibility d) ability - discuss with subject teachers and do not underestimate the effect of hard work and committed effort e) interest in and enjoyment of the subject. Subject teachers, Housemasters, Mr Eccleton (Director of Studies) and Mr Sellars (Careers Adviser) are all available to assist with discussions on subjects to help in the selection of appropriate options, in order that career opportunities and choices are not limited.

OPTION CHOICES Clearly the choice of options at school can greatly determine career choices. Similarly, such subjects as Chemistry, Physics, Biology, English and Art are prerequisites for other university or polytechnic courses. Generally it is important for every student within the practical limitations of his abilities, to take a broad range of options, being careful to maintain essential subjects like Mathematics and some sciences and humanities where possible. Some subjects have prerequisites which may require approval from the HOD of the subject and the Director of Studies, if a student does not have the prerequisite but wants to take the subject. Classical Studies, Art History, Digital Technologies, and Media Studies begin at Year 12. Ongoing study of Accounting and Economics in Year 12 and 13, while not essential prerequisites for tertiary courses, is of great assistance to students in planning commerce studies at a polytechnic or university, and in developing the life skills of personal and business accounting and management. We also offer a course in Financial Literacy for Years 11 and 12 boys. Please read the entry criteria carefully. Likewise Drama, Graphics, Physical Education and Science can enhance a broad education, develop skills and a career focus. The vital importance of the humanities such as Art, Classical Studies, Drama, English, Geography, History, Art History, Languages and Music cannot be underestimated in building a balanced education and providing broad career

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Curriculum Overview

YEAR 12 NCEA Level 2

YEAR 13 NCEA Level 3

SUBJECT

YEAR 9 YEAR 10 YEAR 11 NCEA Level 1

Accounting Agribusiness Art (Painting at Year 12 & 13) Art (Design) Art (Photography) Art History Biology Chemistry Classical Studies Design & Visual Communication (DVC) Digital Technologies Drama Economics (Enterprise& Innovation at Year 10) English Financial Literacy French Geography German History Japanese Materials Technology Mathematics Mathematics with Calculus Mathematics with Statistics Mechanical Engineering Media Studies Music Physical Education, Health &Wellbeing Physics Religious Education Science (General/Year 12&13 Earth&Space Science) Spanish Te Reo Maori

KEY

Subject taught

Compulsory for all

Subject not taught

Compulsory and optional courses in subject

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Christ’s College Canterbury

Year 9 Overview Year 10 Overview

COMPULSORY SUBJECTS English Mathematics

COMPULSORY SUBJECTS English Mathematics

Science (Biology, Chemistry, Physics) History/Geography (half year of each) Languages - French - Japanese - Spanish Te Reo Maori Arts (one-third of the year each of Art,Drama andMusic) Physical Education, Health & Wellbeing Religious Education Technology (aspects of DVC, Digital Technologies and Materials Technology) NOTES – – All classes have a compulsory programme in all areas except languages, where boys Choose ONE out of three

Science (Biology, Chemistry, Physics) History/Geography (half year of each) Arts (one-third of the year each of Art, Drama andMusic) Physical Education, Health & Wellbeing Religious Education OPTIONAL SUBJECTS Two optional subjects (four periods each per week) are chosen from the following list: Art Digital Technologies

DVC - Design & Visual Communications Enterprise & Innovation (Economics) French* Japanese* Materials Technology Music Spanish* Te Reo Maori*

choose ONE out of three languages. Students may not always get their first choice of language.

* Please note that entry into French, Japanese Spanish or Te Reo in Year 10 is normally only for those who have done the Year 9 course in the respective subject(s).

NOTES

– – Some students may study Year 11 Mathematics and are entered for NCEA Level 1.

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Year 11 Overview (NCEA Level 1)

COMPULSORY SUBJECTS English Mathematics or Mathematics for Statistics Physical Education, Health & Wellbeing Religious Education OPTIONAL SUBJECTS Four optional subjects (4 periods each per week) are chosen from the following list: Accounting 2 Art Biology Chemistry Digital Technologies DVC - Design & Visual Communication Drama Economics Financial Literacy French 1 Geography History Japanese 1 Materials Technology Music Physical Education Physics Science (General) 3 Spanish 1 NOTES 1. Entry is normally only for those who have done the Year 10 course. 2. This subject begins in Year 11 and continues through to Year 13. 3. General Science encompasses aspects of Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Earth and Space Science.

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Christ’s College Canterbury

Year 12 Overview (NCEA Level 2)

Year 13 Overview (NCEA Level 3)

OPTIONAL SUBJECTS Accounting Agribusiness Art (Design) Art (Painting) Art (Photography) Art History Biology Chemistry Classical Studies Design & Visual Communication (DVC) Digital Technologies Drama Economics English (The changingworldORThe post-truth society) French Geography

OPTIONAL SUBJECTS Accounting Agribusiness Art (Design) Art (Painting) Art (Photography) Art History Biology Chemistry Classical Studies Digital Technologies Drama Economics English (Text and context OR Visions of masculinity) French German Geography DVC - Design & Visual Communication History Japanese Materials Technology Mathematics OR Mathematics for Statistics Mechanical Engineering Media Studies Music Physical Education Physics Science (Earth & Space Science) – – There are no compulsory subjects in Year 12 – – Six subjects must be chosen, each is taught for 5 periods per week. – – Entry to the Year 12 subjects is not automatic. A satisfactory standard must have been reached in the Year 11 course. – – All course subjects are subject to student demand and availability. NOTES

German Graphics History Japanese Materials Technology Mathematics with Calculus Statistics Mechanical Engineering Media Studies Music Physical Education Physics Science (Earth & Space Science)

NOTES – – There are no compulsory subjects in Year 13. – – All the subjects offered contribute towards a Level 3 NCEA certificate. – – Normally five subjects are chosen which are taught for five periods per week. – – Entry to Year 13 subjects is not automatic. A satisfactory standard must have been reached in the Year 12 course. – – A separate examination will take place in all subjects for students wishing to gain Scholarship. – – Level 3 NCEA English is an entry requirement for Australian universities.

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Entering options online Options are entered online at http://www. selectmysubjects.com.au. You will be emailed a direct link to your account. The email also contains your student access code and password. You can go to the address listed above and enter your access code and password manually if you prefer. If you do not receive an email, or if you delete it, see Mr Hill.

Subject choices 2019 - Login details Enter your subject choices for next year when you are ready. You can go back and change or re-order them any time before the deadline. All subject choices must be entered by 8am on Friday 31 August at the latest. You will not be able to enter your options after this date as the school will start to make decisions about 2019 classes immediately after the deadline. See Mr Eccleton if you have any questions about your subject options or Mr Hill if you have any problems with submitting your options.

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Christ’s College Canterbury

Click on this direct link to enter your preferences: Direct link to my Web Prefrences account Or enter the www.selectmysubjects.com.au address into your browser and log-in with your student access code and password.

LOGIN

To view your subject information click "View Subject Details" near the top right of the screen. To select (or change) your preferences, click the green "Add New Preferences" button.

1 CLICK ADD NEW PREFERENCES

Carefully read the "View Instructions" at the top of the page about your option choices for next year. Select your subjects from the drop down lists. You have 30 minutes to do this before your session expires. Once complete, click the green "Proceed" button.

2 SELECT YOUR PREFERENCES

Note:You are not finished until you complete step 3.

If you are happy with your preferences click the green "Submit Valid Preferences" button which will open your "Preferences Receipt". Or, if you would like to change your preferences click "Cancel" and this will take you back to the Preferences Selection page. It is important that you enter your choices in order of how important they are to you. You can click "Reorder Preferences" on the right of the screen if you need to change your preference order and then "Save Order" . Note: Your choices will not be submitted unless you click "Submit Valid Preferences" .

3 SUBMIT VALID PREFERENCES

If you wish to print a "Preferences Receipt", click "Open Print View" and then "Print Receipt" . To continue click "Return to Home Page" . If you want to change your preferences now, or at any time before the deadline, repeat the whole process by clicking "Add New Preferences" . Exit by clicking "Logout" .

VIEW/PRINT RECEIPT

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Agribusiness

YEAR 12 Status

Optional

Entry by consultation with Director of Studies

Prerequisites

Five

Periods per week

Description Agribusiness is the study of the commercial and business components of the primary sector, the most important sector in the NZ economy. It looks at every step of the supply chain, from research to production, adding value, logistics, marketing, international relationships, and managing risk, as well as sustainable and responsible environmental management. Agribusiness is ideal for anyone seeking a career in the primary or commercial sectors, or for those who wish to learn how to manage a modern farm. Topics may include: • environmental sustainability • business structures (including co-operatives and iwi trusts) • cashflow forecasting • responding to external factors Teaching and learning will include the use of real life case studies, with visits from guest speakers who are leaders in their industry, and field trips. Assessment This course contributes towards NCEA. Eight of the 19 credits are externally assessed, 11 credits are internally assessed. The following achievement standards will be assessed: AS 91866 Conduct an inquiry into the use of organisms to meet future needs. (4 credits – internal) AS 91867 Demonstrate understanding of a primary industry business structure thatmeets the needs of a business. (3 credits – internal) AS 91868 Demonstrate understanding of cash flow forecasting for a business. (4 credits – internal)

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Christ’s College Canterbury

Assessment This course contributes towards NCEA. Five of the (up to) 26 credits are externally assessed, 21 are internally assessed. The following achievement standards will be assessed: AS 91869 Analyse future proofing strategies to ensure long term viability of a business. (4 credits – internal) AS 91871 Analyse how a product meets market needs through innovation in the value chain. (4 credits – internal) AS 91384 Carry out, with consultation, an innovative and sustainable business activity. (9 credits – internal) AS 91532 AnalyseaNZprimary productionenvironmental issue. (5 credits – external) AS 91870 Analyse the effect of financing options of a strategic capital expenditure decision on a business. (4 credits – internal) (If time allows)

AS 90844 Demonstrate understanding of howa large business responds to external factors. (4 credits – external) AS 91297 Demonstrate understanding of land use for primary production inNZ. (4 credits – external)

YEAR 13 Status

Optional (although studying Agribusiness at Level 2 is an advantage) Entry by consultation with Director of Studies

Prerequisites

Five

Periods per week

Description It is not necessary to have takenYear 12 Agribusiness in order to study at Year 13. This course looks closely at the biggest sector in the NZeconomy, including examination of the issues associatedwith environmental sustainability and land use in the primary sector. It is for anyonewho wants to learn the skills associatedwithmanaging a modern operation in the primary sector, or for those looking for a career in commerce. Studentswill plan and develop their own sustainable business,with a primary industry focus,which is an exciting and experiential way to gain practical insight into the content studied.The boyswill work in groups, throughout the year, to complete this aspect of the course.They will also be enrolled in theYoung Enterprise Scheme, aNewZealand-wide initiative, which provides additional resources,mentoring and networking as they develop their businesses. Topics include environmental sustainability, marketing,managing risk through future proofing, and adding value in the supply chain. Teaching and learningwill use real life case studies, visits from guest speakerswho are leaders in their industry, and field trips.

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Art

YEAR 9—CORE ART Status

Compulsory

None

Prerequisites

Three for one term

Periods per week

YEAR 10—CORE ART Status

Compulsory

None

Prerequisites

Two for one term

Periods per week

Description Every student has some exposure to the visual arts and will experience a variety of art approaches, skills and techniques. Each will experiment with materials and media in the broad areas of drawing, painting, lettering, design, printmaking and 3D art. Knowing about art, and how it performs as an expression of society, is also an important aspect of the art programme at all levels in the school.

YEAR 10 Status

Optional

None Four

Prerequisites

Periods per week

Description Students can elect to do extra art in Year 10 to extend their core art studies. This is recommended preparation for NCEA Art. The approach to the subject has changed from the idea that a student must have a natural ability and talent, to an emphasis on an interested student learning art skills and techniques. In this way, he will develop his understanding and confidence to produce his own art work. There is a greater emphasis on knowing about art. There is room for personal expression, but all students must work within the set prescription and be prepared to be guided by the Art teachers. Assessment Major projects and examinations.

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Christ’s College Canterbury

YEAR 11 Status

AS 91321 Produce a systematic body of work that shows understanding of art-making conventions and ideas within painting. (12 credits – external)

Optional

None Four

Prerequisites

Periods per week

Description Year 11 Art involves students in producing work in the following areas: 3D art, drawing, and painting. The course is tightly structured with regular set prep. Assessment There will be two achievement standards Use drawing conventions to develop work in more than one field of practice. (6 credits – internal) AS 90916 Produce a body of work informed by established practice, which develops ideas, using a range of media. (12 credits – external) assessed: AS 90915

LEVEL 2 DESIGN Status

Optional

None

Prerequisites

Description In Year 12 Design, the students are introduced to the conventions of design and will have the opportunity to work in-depth in a range of different topics. A development of a high standard of skills and ideas is expected to be demonstrated at this level. Visual Arts AS 91305 (2.1) Demonstrate an understanding of methods and ideas from established practice appropriate to design (4 credits -internal) Visual Arts AS 91310 (2.2) Use drawing methods to apply knowledge of conventions appropriate to design. (4 credits - internal) Visual Arts AS 91320 (2.4) Produce a systematic body of work that shows understanding of art-making conventions and ideas within design. (12 credits - external)

YEAR 12—VISUAL ART Prerequisites None Periods per week Five Description In Year 12 Visual Art, the student has the

opportunity to work in greater depth in some of the following areas: 3D art, design, painting and drawing. A greater development of skills and ideas is expected to be demonstrated at this level. Opportunity will be provided during the year for students to work on personal projects chosen in consultation with the Art teacher. Assessment There will be three achievement standards assessed: AS 91311 Painting Use drawing methods to apply knowledge of conventions appropriate to painting.

LEVEL 2 PHOTOGRAPHY Status Optional Prerequisites None Description

In Year 12 Photography, the students are introduced to the conventions of digital

photography and will have the opportunity to work in depth into a range of different topics. A development of a high standard of skills and ideas is expected to be demonstrated at this level. Opportunity will be provided during the year for students to work on personal projects chosen in consultation with the Photography teacher.

(4 credits – internal) AS 91316 Painting

Develop ideas in a related series of drawings appropriate to established painting practice. (4 credits – internal)

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Christ’s College Canterbury

Note: There is a requirement that you have a digital SLR camera for this course. Standards offered: Visual Arts AS 91312 (2.2) Use drawing methods to apply knowledge of conventions appropriate to photography. (4 credits – internal) Visual Arts AS 91319 (2.3) Develop ideas in a related series of drawing appropriate to established sculpture practice. (4 credits – internal) Visual ArtsAS91322 (2.4) –TwoPanel Portfolioofwork Produce a systematic body of work that shows understanding of art-making conventions and ideas within photography. (12 credits – external)

Assessment There will be three Level 3 Visual Arts assessments: Visual Arts Design

AS 91445 AS 91446 AS 91447 AS 91449

Use drawing to demonstrate understanding of conventions appropriate to design, painting, photography and sculpture. Visual Arts Painting AS 91450 AS 91451 AS 91452 AS 91454 Systematically clarify ideas using drawing informed by established practice. Visual Arts Photography

AS 91455 AS 91456 AS 91457 AS 91459

YEAR 13 Status

Optional

Years 12 Visual Art or Year12 Design or Year 12 Photography

Prerequisites

Produce a systematic body of work that integrates conventions and regenerates ideas within (design, painting, photography, sculpture) practice.

Five

Periods per week

Description The Year 13 prescription consists of four separate subjects: sculpture, painting, design and photography. Up to 2 of these may be taken as separate Level 3 subjects. Drawing must be an integral part of each subject. For entry into the Canterbury School of Fine Arts, Excellence grades must be gained in two Visual Arts Level 3 subjects. For entry to one of the Christchurch Polytechnic Design courses, a folio of work must be presented in November with an application. Level 3 folders are usually acceptable for this submission. Other tertiary institutions throughout the country have other requirements. It is possible to work towards an application for entry to a particular course while studying a Level 3 Visual Art subject during the Year 13 year. Scholarship is also offered in each of the Visual Art disciplines. Note: If you are undertaking Level 3 Photography, there is a course requirement that you have a digital SLR Camera.

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Art History

YEAR 12 Status:

Optional

This subject begins in Level 2. There are no prerequisites though an interest in art and in history and ability in written language are useful. There is no need for practical artistic ability; an interest in art is sufficient.


Prerequisites:

Periods per week: Five Description: Art History is a high interest subject which studies different cultures and periods of time by examining the art and architecture which they produced, the artists who made them and the understanding of history, society and culture and is very helpful to boys intending careers in architecture, art and design, tourism or museum studies. Art History can be studied at Levels 2 and 3 and at many New Zealand and overseas universities. Even if the subject is not studied beyond school level it will, for most students, provide the foundation for an interest for life. Art History teaches visual analysis, research skills, historical knowledge, interpretation, information analysis, writing skills and critical thinking. Visual literacy is a key to many areas of study today. In Level 2 we focus on the area of study Towards Modernism which examines European art in the 19th century from Neo–Classicism to Post– Impressionism and Art Nouveau. We look at the changes in society and art brought about by the French Revolution and the Industrial Revolution and the impact these changes made to painting, sculpture, architecture and design. Assessment The following achievement standards are assessed: AS 91180 Examine the effects of formal elements of art works. (4 credits – external)
 AS 91182 Examine the influence of context/s on art works. (4 credits – external) society for which they created them. It is a useful subject to gain a deeper

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Christ’s College Canterbury

We will study Topic 4:Modernist Design and Architecture 1900–1960, a study of the importance of design in early modernist thinking,which provides connections with subjects such as Art Design, Design and Visual Communication and Technology. This is complemented by material fromTopic 3:Early Modernism1900–1940,which studies of the varied approaches of modernist painters, sculptors and printmakers within the contexts of early twentieth– century Europe; a topic which is of particular application to practical art students. Assessment The following achievement standards are assessed: AS 91482 Demonstrate understanding of style in art works. (4 credits – external) AS 91484 Examine the relationship(s) between art and context. (4 credits – external)
 AS 91485 Examine the impact of media and processes on art works. (4 credits – internal) AS 91486 Construct an argument based on interpretation of research in art history. (4 credits – internal)
 AS 91488 Examine the relationship(s) between a theory and art works. (4 credits – internal)

AS 91183 Examine the use of media in art works. (4 credits – internal) AS 91184 Research an Art History topic. (4 credits – internal) AS 91186 Demonstrate understanding of art works in relation to their environments. (4 credits – internal)

YEAR 13 Status:

Optional

This subject can be started at Level 3. There are no essential prerequisites though an interest in art and in history and ability in written language are useful. There is no need for practical artistic ability; an interest in art is sufficient.

Prerequisites:

Periods per week: Five Description:

History of Art is a high interest subject which studies different cultures and periods of time by examining the art and architecture which they produced, the artists whomade themand the society for which they created them. It is a useful subject to gain a deeper understanding of history, society and culture and is very helpful to boys intending careers in architecture, art and design, tourismor museum studies. Art History can be studied at Level 3 and at many NewZealand and overseas universities. Even if the subject is not studied beyond school level it will, for most students, provide the foundation for an interest for life. Art History teaches visual analysis, research skills, historical knowledge, interpretation, information analysis,writing skills and critical thinking. Visual literacy is a key tomany areas of study today. At Level 3 classes can study one or two options that range from the Renaissance to the diversity of contemporary art.

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Biology

YEARS 9 & 10 Status

Compulsory

None

Prerequisites

Five (Year 9), four (Year 10), for one module of 11 weeks

Periods per week

Description All students attend a Biology course in Year 9 and 10 as part of their core science education. The course for each year group is based on the new curriculum document. Each course covers interesting aspects of the biological world as well as further developing practical and investigative skills. Year 9 topics • Living things • Cellular life • Diversity of life • Healthy or harmful? The world of mircobes • Feeding the planet • Evolution • Biotechnology Year 10 topics • Ecology: niche, adaptations, energy flow and nutrient cycling, heat distribution • Heart and circulation • Food and nutrition • Reproduction, growth and development, basic genetics • Environmental impact on a freshwater stream and field trip to Cooper’s Creek • Excretion and movement Assessment Biology reports at Year 9 and Year 10 level grade the boys against each of the following curriculum objectives: Knowledge and Understanding (including field and practical work) OBJECTIVE 1 (Year 9) Describe the structure and functioning of a variety of cells. (Year 10) Describe the structure and functioning of human organ systems that carry out key life processes.

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Christ’s College Canterbury

OBJECTIVE 2 (Year 9) Describe the structure and life processes of plants. (Year 10) Describe the structure and functioning of the human reproductive system, and how hereditary information is passed from one generation to the next. OBJECTIVE 3 (Year 9) Describe basic ecological principles. (Year 10) Describe basic ecological principles.

AS 90925 Carry out a practical investigation in a biological context. (4 credits – internal) AS 90928 Demonstrate understanding of the life cycle of flowering plants. (4 credits – external) AS 90929 Demonstrate understanding of biological ideas relating to a mammal as a consumer. (3 credits – external) AS 90948 Demonstrate understanding of genetic variation. (4 credits – external) AS 90950 Investigate biological ideas relating to interactions between humans and micro-organisms. (4 credits – internal) This course offers the students a total of 19 credits of which 8 credits are assessed internally, and 11 credits are assessed externally through external examinations in November. The three external examinations come from both biology and science areas. Two of the examination papers are sat during the biology examination time slot. The remaining examination paper will be sat during the science three-hour examination time slot, which takes place on a different day. In the case of Biology, this is the genetics paper (Science 1.9). This means that for boys doing any of the specialist science subjects, they will be sitting external papers on at least two of the examination days in November. Boys who enrol for both Level 1 Science and Biology can only gain credit for any overlapping science achievement standards once (in particular, the genetics externally assessed paper). Skills acquired Students continue to develop the scientific and thinking skills of: • using and communicating knowledge • planning and carrying out practical investigations • observing, collecting, recording, processing and interpreting data

YEAR 11 Status

Optional

Year 10 Biology pass

Prerequisites

Four

Periods per week

Description We have chosen the Level 1 Biology course to be relevant, challenging and interesting. It provides students with a range of learning contexts and provides an excellent foundation for further study in the subject. Biology is a subject that is of universal interest, but is vast, and ever expanding. Although the specialist vocabulary required to be a confident biologist can be daunting, the Biology teachers support students in this area through explicit literacy skills training that helps develop confidence and general NCEA examination skills. We recommend students take this course if they are considering taking Biology in the senior school due to the synergy that comes from having a broader biological knowledge to draw from. The Level 1 curriculum includes: • An extended laboratory practical investigation • The biology of mammals, focusing on the life processes of digestion, circulation and respiration • The biology of flowering plants • DNA, genetics, and cell division processes • Investigate life processes of plants and how these are affected by environmental factors • Investigate howmicro-organisms affect humans The Year 11 Biology course will be assessed against the following NCEA Level 1 Biology and Science achievement standards:

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YEAR 12 Status

AS 91156 Demonstrate understanding of life processes at the cellular level. (4 credits – external) AS 91157 Demonstrate understanding of genetic variation and change. (4 credits – external) AS 91158 Investigate a pattern in an ecological community. (4 credits – internal) AS 91159 Demonstrate understanding of gene expression. (4 credits – external) This course demands a high level of effort and attention to detail, where students develop much more confidence in their ability to think logically and express their ideas clearly. Any boys considering doing any biology-based course in preparation for their future career will benefit hugely from the Level 2 Biology course.

Optional

Level 1 Biology preferred

Prerequisites

Five

Periods per week

Description The Level 2 Biology course is one that students find both interesting and challenging. It is at this level that students realise just what a diverse and important subject Biology is, and how its skills are used in so many different careers. Some boys will have their minds on Medicine or Agriculture as a career, while others are keeping their options open, contemplating doing a Science degree at tertiary level. It is important that before too much specialisation takes place, the students see the full scope of Biology, and it is at the Year 12 level that this process begins in earnest. Although students are accepted if they have not completed a Level 1 Biology or General Science course, they should expect to complete extra work to supplement their knowledge. The year begins with an ecology focus and involves a trip to Brooklands Lagoon to study the zonation pattern on the salt marsh prior to an extended field trip to the Craigieburn area, where the assessment takes place. In addition, the course this year includes: • an extended laboratory practical investigation • cell biology and detailed microscope work • DNA, genetic variation and gene expression • adaptations to organs in relation to survival It is important that students understand that Biology can be studied at themolecular level (DNA, enzymes andmetabolic pathways), the cellular level, the body system level, and an ecological level. Assessment The Level 2 Biology course of 26 credits will be assessed against the following NCEA Level 2 achievement standards (six from the Biology subject area and one from Education for Sustainability): AS 91153 Carry out a practical investigation in a biological context. (4 credits – internal) AS 91155 Demonstrate understanding of adaptation of plants or animals to their way of life. (3 credits – internal)

YEAR 13 Status

Optional

Level 2 Biology preferred

Prerequisites

Five

Periods per week

Description Students study the nature of life at all biological levels. The course covers: • using and communicating knowledge • the human manipulation of DNA in the science of genetic engineering, • the evolutionary processes that form new species and the evolution of humans • theseasonal responsesofplantstoday length, complex navigation methods, and reproductive strategies of animals, • the homeostatic mechanisms that control the

blood sugar levels, temperature, blood pressure and metabolic rate of mammals.

The Level 3 Biology course contains the following achievement standards, which will be assessed: AS91601 Carry out a practical investigation in a biological context, with guidance. (4 credits – internal)

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Christ’s College Canterbury

AS91603 Demonstrate understanding of the responses of plants and animals to their external environment. (5 credits – external) AS91604 Demonstrate understanding of how an animal maintains a stable internal environment. (3 credits – internal) AS91605 Demonstrate understanding of evolutionary processes leading to speciation. (4 credits – external) AS91606 Demonstrate understanding of trends in human evolution. (4 credits – external) AS91607 Demonstrate understanding of human manipulations of genetic transfer and its biological implications. (3 credits – internal) There is a total of 23 credits available in this course. The Level 3 course truly bridges the gap between College and university study as it aims to build on the wider application of the important biological principles studied at Level 1 and Level 2 level. The classroom becomes much more of a forum for the presentation, discussion and evaluation of interesting and challenging concepts. Each year a significant number of boys opt to take this Level 3 Biology course purely because they are interested in biology, and enjoy learning about the diversity and intricacy of living organisms (including our own origins) rather than because they are considering a career in Biology. This is great, as these boys contribute hugely to the atmosphere in the classroom. It is hoped that all boys develop a greater understanding of the rapidly changing world they are living in, and get a chance to discuss the ‘meaning of life’. There is an expectation that boys are able to express themselves clearly in their written answers, and many find that their writing skills, and coherent expression of ideas improve over the year. This is not so say that boys need wonderful literacy skills to take Biology, but like a lot of subjects at this level, it helps!

Can you pick up Level 3 Biology without doing Level 2 Biology? There are usually some boys who opt to begin their senior Biology at Level 3 level, and they find it an achievable challenge. Much of the vocabulary is new to them, as are some of the key concepts, but much of the course is new to all boys, and a lot of it is intuitive or logical. Some of these boys take Biology because they are changing direction in their course and are now considering a science degree involving Biology, but others are taking it purely for interest, having not had the opportunity to consider Biology as an option until now.

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Chemistry

YEAR 9 Status

Compulsory

None

Prerequisites

Five for 1/3 of the year

Periods per week

Description Although most students will have been introduced to Chemistry as “making sense of the material world” in the Science curriculum in their junior school, the formal study of Chemistry is treated as a new subject. A variety of contexts designed to emphasise the practical applications of Chemistry are used to teach the scientific method, laboratory skills and the simple language of Chemistry. The subject matter is elementary and largely descriptive, and students are always encouraged to practise safe laboratory procedures.

Topics covered include: • the nature of matter • elements, mixtures and compounds • physical and chemical changes • acids and bases • separation techniques

Practical skills introduced include: • working safely in a laboratory • using Bunsen burners to heat and combust materials • using scientific equipment tomakemeasurements

• carrying out chemical reactions • testing for chemical substances Assessment

The discipline of written reports of work carried out in the laboratory is encouraged and assessed, and factual material is tested during the term. An examination completes assessment at the end of the module.

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Christ’s College Canterbury

YEAR 10 Status

Students will be engaged in wide range of practical tasks designed to develop and reinforce a deeper understanding of the ways in which chemical species react together. Example tasks include investigating chemical reaction rates, methods of testing for chemical substances, the properties of carbon compounds, reactions of chemical elements, and displacement reactions between metals. The course introduces students to many interesting topics relevant to senior Chemistry and the sound grounding in reaction chemistry given to those who wish to further their study of Chemistry is highly beneficial. In any serious study of science, Chemistry is fundamental to the point that it is often described as the central science. Students wishing to keep their options open in the physical and natural sciences, including Engineering, Medicine, Geology, Agriculture, Food Science or Polymer Science, should include Chemistry in their courses at this level. Students should also be aware that combinations of the science subjects are important to consider. Physical sciences require the combination of Physics, Mathematics and Chemistry, while the natural sciences require Biology, Statistics and Chemistry. Assessment The Year 11 Chemistry course will be assessed against the following NCEA Level 1 Chemistry and Science achievement standards: AS 90930 Carry out a practical chemistry investigation with direction. (4 credits – internal) AS 90933 Demonstrate understanding of aspects of selected elements. (4 credits – external) AS 90934 Demonstrate understanding of chemical reactions. (4 credits – external) AS 90944 Demonstrate understanding of aspects of acids and bases. (4 credits – external) AS 90945 Investigate implications of the use of carbon compounds as fuels. (4 credits – internal)

Compulsory

None

Prerequisites

Four for 1/3 of the year

Periods per week

Description The mainly descriptive work begun in Year 9 is continued, with the special language that chemists use being extended as students become more familiar with formulae and simple equations. Chemical reactions between different substances is a major focus of the course, engaging all students in developing a well-rounded view and understanding of the chemical nature of our world. Topics covered include: • metals

• rates of chemical reactions • oxygen, oxides and the air

• carbon chemistry • acids and bases • carbon dioxide

Assessment Assessment of work follows a pattern similar to that followed in Year 9 and again terminates with an examination at the end of the module. At the completion of Year 10, students have studied an introductory course which has them well prepared to extend their knowledge of reaction chemistry and consolidate skills associated with laboratory work in the Year 11 course.

YEAR 11 Status

Optional

None Four

Prerequisites

Periods per week

Description An attempt is made to systematise chemical information on the basis of the Periodic Table and a great deal of reaction chemistry is introduced. Patterns in the behaviour and properties of groups of related substances are stressed in terms of non-metal chemistry, metal chemistry and organic chemistry. The chemical concepts learned in Year 9 and 10 form a platform for the Year 11 course.

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