Paul Tafelski - December 2019

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December 2019

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Growing on Ice Hockey and Fatherhood

It’s hard to believe, but another decade’s coming to an end. In some ways, it feels like it’s flown by, and in others, it’s felt like a lifetime. Of course, fatherhood probably has a lot to do with why I experienced it that way — in 2010, my son Frank was 7. Now, he’s a month away from his 17th birthday, and I’m wondering where all the years went. It’s amazing how much kids change in the span of a decade. Frank used to talk about Spongebob or Pokemon, but now, he’ll ask me questions about the stock market at breakfast. The only thing that has been close to a constant in his life has been hockey. I played my share of sports growing up but never really got out on the ice. Heck, before Frank was born, I’d only gone to a handful of RedWings games, and even then, I barely had an understanding of hockey. I knew it was fast paced and could see why people found it exciting, but beyond “get the puck in the net,” the rules were an utter mystery to me. So, when Frank started taking an interest in the sport at age 4, I knew we were stepping into a whole new world. I still remember his first goal. As you can imagine, a hockey game between 4- and 5-year-olds is sheer chaos, with kids sliding left and right. But Frank found his moment, flinging the puck all the way from the blue line, “If you want to stay in the game, you have to realize that your kids will keep moving and growing, and that’s what makes it so exciting.”

moving and growing, and that’s what makes it so exciting.

sending it sailing through the goalie’s legs. I remember that and so many other proud moments he’s had on the ice — and of course, I remember the penalties too. When you’re raising an only child, it can be hard to have any perspective as a parent. You want to do everything right and view each and every experience as having been important and pivotal in your kid’s life. Looking back, I was too worried about him missing out, or making mistakes, or falling down. I’ve had to realize that those things are just as important to growing up as the big, memorable moments. So, much like hockey, fatherhood was a learning experience for me. I didn’t know all the intricacies stepping into it, and it proved just as fast-paced as everyone said it was. It seems like just yesterday I would help Frank into his pads at the ice rink — now he drives himself to practice. If you want to stay in the game, you have to realize that your kids will keep

More than any fast breaks or game-winning goals, what has made me the most proud over the years is watching Frank grow into a thoughtful person. He wants to be successful and do good in the world, and he is putting in the effort to make those dreams a reality. I think that’s something every parent wants to see. If you have young kids at home, cherish those moments with them. It’s easy to think things will stay the way they are forever, but believe me, the time will fly by. The best advice I can give you is to not sweat the small stuff. It’s easy to see all the little things in a child’s life as being important, but don’t overdo it. It’s okay to relax and watch as your kids learn and grow.

-Paul J. Tafel ski

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There’s No Expiration Date on Entrepreneurship THE JOYS OF STARTING A BUSINESS AFTER YOU ‘RETIRE’

As a nation, America is getting older. By 2030, 20% of Americans will be 65 or older. With people living longer than ever before and the baby boomers approaching retirement age en masse, older adults will continue to have a massive impact on the American economy at large. Normally, we think of seniors as people who cash in on the hard work they’ve already accomplished. Many young people even worry Social Security will be wiped out by the time they reach retirement age. But who’s to say older adults can’t contribute to the economy? If you’ve ever tried to change jobs late in your career or pick up some part-time work after retirement, you know it’s hard to be hired as a senior. Quartz recently called seniors “the economy’s most underused natural resource.” Until more employers understand the value and potential of older workers, entrepreneurship remains the most viable avenue for seniors wanting to work after their primary career has ended. There are a number of reasons why seniors find creating their own business to be rewarding and why they tend to succeed when they do. Unlike younger people, who often become business owners in an attempt to make a fortune, older entrepreneurs can be content with small, sustainable micro-businesses. They also approach their businesses with a wealth of experience that can’t be purchased. As a result, 70% of ventures founded by older entrepreneurs are still open five years later, more than double the rate of the general population.

With so much potential to be found in senior-run businesses, it’s no surprise that organizations are rushing to empower older adults with the tools they need to succeed. Senior Planet, a coworking space for seniors with outposts nationwide, teaches classes on skills like website creation in a space that makes older learners feel welcome and comfortable. On top of being an important economic driver, entrepreneurship can be a wonderful way for seniors to generate meaning and value in their lives. It’s never too late to start the business of your dreams.

Royal Rinks CURLING ATHLETES EVERY FAN SHOULD KNOW Every four years, as some of the world’s best Olympic athletes battle for gold medals, the world falls in love with curling. Curling originated in 16th-century Scotland and is most popular in Canada, where many Scots immigrated. Now, 480 years after the first recorded instance of curling occurred on a frozen pond in Scotland, many devotees have left their mark on the sport’s history. These are just a few of the greats. Harvey Mazinke Curling Team In 1973, Canada held its collective breath as the Harvey Mazinke Curling Team took their final shot in a world championship match against Sweden. The rock ultimately failed to reach the rings, crowning Sweden as world champions and snapping the 10-0 record Harvey Mazinke had built during a week of competition. But regardless of that final score, Harvey Mazinke’s impact on the sport was not diminished. The team was crowned the Canadian Men’s Curling Champions in 1973, and the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame recognizes them as “ambassadors to the game.”

Roy Thiessen Choosing only one devoted coach to highlight is difficult, but it must be Roy Thiessen. Roy coached championship teams —or rinks, as they are called in curling— at both provincial and national levels. His expertise led him to chair the first Saskatchewan Summer Games in 1972, theWorld Junior Men’s Curling Championships in 1979, and theWorld Ladies’Curling Championships in 1983. Budding athletes can learn all of Roy’s secrets and the fundamentals of curling in the numerous books he wrote.

Joyce McKee Curling Team Without Joyce McKee, Sylvia Fedoruk, Donna Belding, and Muriel Coben, the Canadian Ladies Curling Association Championship, now called the Scotties Tournament of Hearts, would have never become the nationally recognized organization it is today. The aforementioned women were part of the Joyce McKee rink and were the first winners of the championship in 1960. Their style, play, and knowledge propelled women’s curling into the leagues of men’s competitions, proving that women could compete at just as high of a level as their male peers. To this day, the Joyce McKee rink’s accuracy is unparalleled. If you can’t wait another two years before curling hits center stage at the Winter Olympics, check out the podcast “Curling Legends” to get your fix of curling greatness.

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TAKE A BREAK

We all know reindeer visit our rooftops every Christmas Eve, but what brings them there? Follow the unique and complicated history of Santa’s reindeer to find out. A visit fromwho on what night? In the 1820s, Clement Clarke Moore penned a holiday poem that became the foundation for a phenomenon still alive today. Commonly known as “‘Twas the Night Before Christmas,”“A Visit From St. Nicholas” is a beloved story shared by every generation. It is in this poem that reindeer were first credited with powering Santa’s sleigh around the globe. Many popular songs, movies, and plays have preserved Moore’s vision of St. Nick, and his reindeer and their names are no exception. (Well, kind of.) Rudolph wouldn’t join the squad until a department store added him as part of their promotions in the 1930s. What’s in a name? Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, and Cupid were all brought to life by Moore, but have you ever heard of Dunder and Blixem? Though we now know the duo as Donner and Blitzen, Moore originally named them Dunder and Blixem— the Dutch words for thunder and lightning — but publishing companies wanted names that would rhyme better with the rest of the poem. Still, it was a few decades before Donner and Blitzen made their appearances in the version of the poem we know today. Reindeer burgers, anyone? Moore’s poem paved the way for Santa’s most famous form of transportation, but it was actually Carl Lomen, an Alaskan businessman, who mass-marketed reindeer as Santa’s companions. In the late 1890s, the Sami natives of Northern Europe, who were longtime reindeer herders, made their passage from Norway to the U.S. with a herd of reindeer to invigorate the Alaskan landscape and help their native neighbors. Lomen saw the reindeer as an opportunity and partnered with the Macy’s department store company to create a promotional Christmas parade in which Santa, led by his reindeer, a sleigh, and Sami herders, were prominently featured. Lomen’s goal was to promote his massive reindeer conglomerate for the production and sale of reindeer meat. Instead, a holiday story was born. WHAT ABOUT DUNDER AND BLIXEM? The Strange History of Santa’s Reindeer

CLASSIC ROAST CHICKEN

Inspired by Ina Garten

Ingredients

1 head garlic, cut in half crosswise

1 chicken, approx. 5–6 lbs

2 tbsp unsalted butter, melted

Kosher salt

1 large yellow onion, thickly sliced 4 carrots, peeled and cut into 2-inch pieces

Freshly ground pepper

1 large bunch fresh thyme, 20 sprigs removed

1 lemon, halved

Olive oil

Directions

1. Heat oven to 425 F. 2. Rinse chicken inside and out, removing giblets if included. Move to a work surface, pat dry, and liberally season with salt and pepper. Stuff cavity with thyme bunch, lemon halves, and garlic head. Brush outside with butter, and then season again. Tie chicken legs together with kitchen string. 3. Meanwhile, in a roasting pan, toss onions and carrots in olive oil and season with salt, pepper, and 20 sprigs of thyme. 4. Place the chicken on the vegetables and roast for 1 1/2 hours. 5. Remove from oven, and let stand for 20 minutes covered with foil. 6. Slice and serve with the vegetables.

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE

1

Being A Hockey Parent

The Power of Senior Entrepreneurship Get to Know Some of Curling’s Best Athletes

2

Classic Roast Chicken How Santa Claus Became Powered by Reindeer

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Glamping at Its Finest

YURT SWEET YURT GLAMPING IN BEAUTIFUL LOCATIONS

Spruce Hole Yurt, Colorado

The allure of the great outdoors calls to many, but pitching a tent and cooking over a fire isn’t for everyone. If that describes you, consider the yurt: a small, permanent structure often outfitted with electricity, plumbing, and other modern amenities. Expertly nestled in remote locations, they provide comforts of home in the midst of nature. Here are just a few around the United States available for rent. For those new to the glamping scene, this is a great choice for an easy transition. With picturesque views of the Pacific Ocean, the Treebones Resort in Big Sur has an array of spaciously comfortable yurts to choose from. The resort has heated pools, a cozy lodge, and even a sushi bar. About an hour up the coastline, you can find a few shops, restaurants, and art galleries if you decide you’ve gotten your dose of nature for the day. Treebones Resort, California

Nestled in the San Juan Mountains about 10 miles north of New Mexico, this yurt is a snow- lover’s paradise. Skiing, snowshoeing, and hiking trails are plentiful in this backcountry location. At the end of a chilly day, come home to comfy beds, cooking supplies, and decor made to feel like you’re camping — but with sturdy walls to keep out the cold. For the glampers who truly want to get away, hike just under 1 mile into the woods of the Adirondack Mountains to discover rustic yurts beckoning you to cook over a fire or bundle up with a book. At night, the yurt’s domed skylight offers excellent stargazing. For those keen on winter activities, skiing and snowshoeing trails start right outside the front door. In the summer, enjoy hiking, fishing, and swimming. Falls Brook Yurts, NewYork

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