Gr 1_Research Sample Content_MR FG

Grade 1 Sample Content

MODULE 6

UNDERSTAND PUT TOGETHER AND TAKE APART PROBLEMS

Introduce and Check for Readiness • Module Opener  • Are You Ready?

Represent Total Unknown Problems with Objects and Drawings Learning Objective: Use objects and drawings to show Put Together Total Unknown word problems, write an equation that matches the problem, and solve the problem. ReviewVocabulary: equation Represent Both Addends Unknown Problems with Objects and Drawings Learning Objective: Use objects and drawings to show Put Together and Take Apart Both Addends Unknown word problems, write an equation that matches the problem, and solve the problem. Represent Addend Unknown Problems with Objects and Drawings Learning Objective: Use objects and drawings to show Put Together Addend Unknown word problems, write an equation that matches the problem, and solve the problem. Online Professional Learning Video Represent Total Unknown Problems with a Visual Model Learning Objective: Use visual models to show Put Together problems where the total is unknown, write an equation that matches the problem, and solve the problem. Represent Addend Unknown and Both Addends Unknown Problems with a Visual Model Learning Objective: Use visual models to show Put Together and Take Apart problems where one or both addends are unknown, write an equation that matches the problem, and solve the problem. Solve Put Together and Take Apart Problems Learning Objective: Use visual models to show Put Together and Take Apart problems, write an equation that matches the problem, and solve the problem.

Lesson 1—1 Day Build Understanding

Lesson 2—1 Day Build Understanding

Lesson 3—1 Day Build Understanding

Lesson 4—2 Days Connect Concepts and Skills

Lesson 5—2 Days Connect Concepts and Skills

Lesson 6—1 Day Apply and Practice

Solve Addition and Subtraction Problems Learning Objective: Solve Add To, Take From, Put Together, and Take Apart problems and write an equation that matches the problem.

Lesson 7—2 Days Apply and Practice

Assessment • Module 6 Test (Forms A and B) • Unit 2 Performance Task after Module 8

See the entire scope and sequence in the Planning and Pacing Guide.

Build Understanding

Connect Concepts and Skills

Apply and Practice

167A

Module 6

TEACHING FOR SUCCESS

TEACHING FOR DEPTH: Understand Put Together and Take Apart Problems

Make Connections  Before Grade 1, children learned the foundation for number sense, which includes the names of numbers and the counting sequence. Children were also introduced to the concepts of addition and subtraction situations. They represented “putting together” and “taking apart” by acting out situations and using equations to show problems. In Grade 1, children represent these "putting together" and "taking apart" situations by using concrete objects and visual models, then writing equations to model the problems. Writing equations helps reinforce the conceptual knowledge of addition and subtraction. Mathematical Progressions Across the Grades Prior Learning

Children can then begin to see and to understand how to show an unknown number in an equation to match the problem. After Grade 1, children will extend their knowledge of "putting together" and "taking apart" to include two-step word problems and adding and subtracting greater numbers. By knowing and understanding the addition and subtraction concepts for one-step problems, children can then transition to two-step problems. Children’s knowledge to relate addition to subtraction can help them fluently add and subtract within 20 using mental strategies.

Current Development

Future Connections

Children: • solved word problems involving addition and subtraction within 10. • used objects, drawings, and equations to represent and solve Put Together and Take Apart problems within 10.

Children: • use objects, drawings, and equations to represent and solve Put Together and Take Apart Total Unknown problems within 20. • use objects, drawings, and equations to represent and solve Put Together and Take Apart Addend Unknown problems within 20. • use objects, drawings, and equations to represent and solve Put Together and Take Apart Both Addends Unknown problems within 20.

Children: • will use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve word problems. • will solve two-step addition and subtraction word problems.

TEACHER

TO TEACHER

From the Classroom

• I see the number 7 on your paper. What does that tell me? • What equation can you write to show that when you subtract 5 from 12 you get 7? • How did these tally marks help you know the answer is 7? Where is the 12 in your tally marks? Where is the 5? Where is the 7? • On someone else’s paper I saw 12 – 5 = 5. Do you think that is correct? Why? Preparing questions like these before a lesson keeps me on track for focusing on children΄s understanding and not just reverting to focusing on getting the answer.

Support productive struggle in learning mathematics.  I used to plan my math lessons thinking about how to remove all ambiguity so that children could quickly complete tasks without confusion. Now I see the importance of providing opportunities for children to make their own decisions and to grapple with the mathematics they are learning. Instead of showing and telling children how to think about the mathematics, I facilitate a discussion by asking children thought- provoking questions. When we are working on addition and subtraction, I want to encourage them to think about the number relationships and making connections between the numbers and the representations. For the problem 12 – 5, I ask questions like:

167B

Understand Put Together and Take Apart Problems

LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT• Planning for Instruction

 By giving all children regular exposure to language routines in context, you will provide opportunities for children to listen for , and speak , read , and write about mathematical situations. You will also give children the opportunity to develop understanding of both mathematical language and concepts. Using Language Routines to Develop Understanding Use the Professional Learning Cards for the following routines to plan for effective instruction. Three Reads  Lessons 6.2, 6.3, 6.4, and 6.5 Children read a problem or the teacher reads the problem three times with a specific focus each time. 1st Read  What is the problem about? 2nd Read  What do each of the numbers describe? 3rd Read  What math questions could you ask about the problem? Stronger and Clearer Each Time  Lessons 6.1–6.7 Children write their reasoning about a problem, share that reasoning, explain it, listen to feedback, respond to feedback, and then refine their reasoning by writing again. Compare and Connect  Lesson 6.1 Children listen to a partner's solution strategy, identify it, and then compare it to and contrast it with their own. Critique, Correct, and Clarify  Lessons 6.5 and 6.7 Children correct the work in a flawed explanation, argument, or solution method; share with a partner; and refine the sample work. Connecting Language to Understanding Put Together and Take Apart Problems Watch for children's use of the review term listed below as they explain their reasoning and make connections with new concepts.

Linguistic Note Conjunctions such as and and or are often used in mathematics. For example, the instruction to use addition or subtraction to solve a problem may confuse children. To prevent confusion, help children understand how conjunctions are used.

Key Academic Vocabulary

Prior Learning · ReviewVocabulary

equation a numerical sentence that shows two quantities are equal

167C

Module 6

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MODULE 6

Apple Appeal Assess Prerequisite Concepts Grade K Module 12

Module 6

Understand Put Together and Take Apart Problems

Have children complete the Module Opener Task. This task can be use to determine understanding of the prerequisite concept of addition and subtraction facts to 10. Engage Children Have children work in mixed-ability groups to complete the task. This task is designed to: • activate prior knowledge that is essential for success in the upcoming module. • challenge children to think critically and justify their reasoning. • encourage cooperation, collaboration, and discourse within a group. Guide Children's Discussion Listen for children who correctly use vocabulary as part of their discourse. Children should be familiar with the terms addends , equations , and related facts . Ask children to explain what they mean if they use those terms. Sample Guided Discussion: Q How do you know the color of each apple?  Possible answer: If the answer is 7, 8, or 9 I color the apple red. If the answer is not 7, 8, or 9, I color the apple yellow.

Rae and her family buy red and yellow apples. Solve each equation. If the answer is 7, 8, or 9, color the apple . Color the other apples . Apple Appeal

8

6

red

yellow

10 − 2 =

4 + 2 =

7

9

red

red

7 − 0 =

1 + 8 =

7

5

red

yellow

3 + 4 =

9 − 4 =

Compare the apples you colored. Does the family buy more red or yellow apples?

red

apples

more

Turn and Talk

If the family buys 2 more apples, how many apples will they have? Explain.

See possible answer at the right. one hundred sixty-seven

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Module 6

Q What strategy did you use to add or subtract?  Answers will vary.

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COMMON ERRORS

Turn and Talk  Encourage children to listen to their partner's ideas. Possible answer: They would buy 8 apples. They had 6 apples, and now they have 2 more. 6 + 2 = 8

Children may make errors in adding or subtracting. Watch for children who miscalculate the sum or the difference. Ask: • How can you check your answer? Watch for children who perform the wrong operation. Have them circle the operation symbol and check their work. Ask: • Look at your answer to the problem. Does it make sense?

Extend the Task • Have children write other equations that have a sum or a difference of 3 or 4.

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Module 6

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ONL INE

Assign the Digital Are You Ready? to power actionable reports including • proficiency by standards • item analysis

Name

ONLINE

Are You Ready? Complete these problems to review prior concepts and skills you will need for this module. Add Groups 1 Circle the two groups to put them together. Write how many altogether.

Are You Ready? Diagnostic Assessment • Diagnose prerequisite mastery. • Identify intervention needs. • Modify or set up leveled groups.

7

6 + 1 =

Have students complete the Are You Ready? assessment on their own. Items test the prerequisites required to succeed with the new learning in this module. Add Groups  This item will assess whether children can add to put two groups together. Use Symbols to Subtract  This item will assess whether children can write and solve an equation to match a visual model. Add in Any Order  This item will assess whether children can change the order of the addends and know the sum stays the same.

Use Symbols to Subtract 2 Use the picture. Write the subtraction equation.

8

5

3

=

Add in Any Order 3 Write the sum. Change the order of the addends. Write the addition equation.

9

2

7

9

+

=

7 + 2 =

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DATA-DRIVEN INTERVENTION

RtI MTSS

Concept/Skill

Objective

Prior Learning *

Intervene with

Add Groups

Show how to put two groups together and find the sum.

Grade K, Lesson 12.1

• Tier 3 Skill 6 • Reteach, Grade K, Lesson 12.1

Use Symbols to Subtract

Write a subtraction equation to match a picture.

Grade K, Lesson 11.6

• Tier 2 Skill 11 • Reteach, Grade K, Lesson 11.6 • Tier 2 Skill 10 • Reteach, Grade 1, Lessons 3.1–3.2

Add in Any Order

Change the order of addends and write an equation to solve.

Grade 1, Lessons 3.1–3.2

* Your digital materials include access to resources from Grades K–3. The lessons referenced here contain a variety of resources you can use with children who need support with this content.

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Module 6

Connect Concepts and Skills

6.4 Represent Total Unknown

Problems with a Visual Model

LESSON FOCUS AND COHERENCE Mathematics Standards

■  Major    ■  Supporting    ●  Additional

Learning Objective Use visual models to show Put Together problems where the total is unknown, write an equation that matches the problem, and solve the problem. Language Objectives • Explain how to use visual models to solve Put Together Total Unknown problems. • Explain how to write equations to solve Put Together Total Unknown problems. Lesson Materials:  two-color counters, connecting cubes

 Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. Mathematical Practices and Processes  MP • Reason abstractly and quantitatively. • Model with mathematics. I Can Objective  I can make a visual model to solve word problems when the total is unknown.

Mathematical Progressions Prior Learning Children: • used objects, drawings, and equations to represent and solve Put Together problems within 10. (GrK, 12.1, 12.3) • used objects, drawings, and equations to represent and solve Take Apart problems within 10. (GrK, 12.2, 12.4)

Current Development

Future Connections

Children: • use objects, drawings, and equations to represent and solve Put Together Total Unknown problems within 20. • use bar models to solve problems.

Children: • will use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve word problems. (Gr2, 14.3–14.5, 15.1–15.2) • will solve multi-step addition and subtraction word problems (Gr2, 15.3)

PROFESSIONAL LEARNING

Using Mathematical Practices and Processes Reason abstractly and quantitatively.

In this lesson, children will begin to transition from visual models or symbols identified with 1:1 correspondence to using numerals. Children have already worked with this problem type; the emphasis here is on extending their ability to reason without the aid of concrete models. Using concrete and visual models can help children develop mathematical understanding. At this point, they begin to make the transition from concrete to abstract. Provide a variety of opportunities for children to make the transition across contexts. Some children may require additional time or support to make the transition. Continue to provide scaffolding that supports comprehension of the relationship between concrete objects and numerical abstractions.

181A

Lesson 6.4

ONL INE

WARM-UP OPTIONS

PROJECTABLE & PRINTABLE

ACTIVATE PRIOR KNOWLEDGE • Review Addition Facts

Use these activities to quickly assess and activate prior knowledge as needed. Math Routine

Make Connections Based on children’s responses to the Math Routine, choose one of the following: 1  Project the Interactive Reteach Activity, Grade K, Lesson 12.3

Number Talk  Look at the dots. What number fact do they bring to mind? Write the math fact on your MathBoard. Is there another equation the dots can show? Explain.

2  Complete the Prerequisite Skills Activity:

Write the sum. 9 + 1 = _____ 6 + 3 = _____ 3 + 3 = _____ 2 + 8 = _____ If children continue to struggle, use Tier 2 Skill 10. 10 9 6 10

Reveal the image. Have children record their equations on their MathBoards. Ask children to share their equations. Have children share their thinking, referencing the art while they talk. How did they group the dots? How did they decide which number fact to write? Give a few children the opportunity to share. Children may see and group the same dot image differently. Accept all answers.

SHARPEN SKILLS

If time permits, use this on-level activity to build fluency and practice basic skills. Mental Math Objective: Children write sums for one-digit addition equations.

Solve as many as you can. 7 + 7 = _____ 14

2 + 9 = _____ 8 + 7 = _____ 11 15

4 + 7 = _____ 5 + 9 = _____ 11 14

8 + 3 = _____ 11

181B

Module 6

PLAN FOR DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION

RtI MTSS

Small-Group Options Use these teacher-guided activities with pulled small groups at the teacher table.

On Track

Almost There

Ready for More

RtI

Materials: number cubes (labeled 4–9), two-color counters

Materials: connecting cubes

Materials: number cubes (labeled 4–9)

Use this Tabletop Flipchart Mini-Lesson to guide children to explore bar models. Read the problem on the flipchart to children. Discuss what they need to find out. Then help children use connecting cubes to show the problem and complete the bar model. Finally, have children write an equation to match the problem and solve. Repeat with other numbers.

Prepare bar model drawings for children. Use number cubes with the numbers 4–9. Working in pairs, have each child toss one number cube. Have children use the numbers to fill in a bar model to help solve the problem. Finally, ask children to write an equation that matches the bar model. Have children repeat the process.

Prepare bar model drawings for children. Use number cubes with the numbers 4–9. Working in pairs, have each child toss one number cube. Then children use the numbers they tossed and make concrete models or drawings to show how to solve an addition problem. Ask the pair to fill in a bar model to help solve the problem. Finally, ask children to write an equation that matches the bar model. Have children repeat the process.

Tabletop Flipchart: Lesson 6.4

Mini-Lesson

Use these student self-directed activities at centers or stations. Math Center Options

 Print Resources  ●  Online Resources

Key:  ●

On Track

Almost There

Ready for More

●● More Practice/Homework 6.4

Reteach 6.4 Interactive Reteach 6.4

Challenge 6.4 Interactive Challenge 6.4 Poggles MX: Addition and Subtraction, Level 28, Teen Numbers

My Learning Summary

Tier 2 Skill 10: Add in Any Order

ONL INE

View data-driven grouping recommendations

and assign dierentiation resources.

181C

Lesson 6.4

Spark Your Learning •  Student Samples

During the Spark Your Learning, listen and watch for strategies students use. See samples of student work on this page.

If children . . . represent the problem with concrete models or drawings and identify the solution, they are demonstrating exemplary understanding of how to represent the problem. Have these children . . . share and explain how they solved the problem. Ask: Q How did you show this problem?

Use Visual Model

Strategy 1

14 robins

If children . . . draw a visual model but compare (or subtract) values, instead of adding, they may be confused about the wording of the problem. Then intervene . . . by reviewing the question within the problem. Ask: Q What is being asked in this problem? Q How can you use your visual model to find the answer? If children . . . draw counters in a random arrangement, they might be able to find the solution, but they may benefit from organizing the counters into groups. Activate prior knowledge . . . by having children think about an organizing tool such as a ten frame to organize their drawing. Ask: Q What does your drawing show? Q How could you better organize your drawing? Q If you put the number of birds Ayden sees with the number of birds Gina sees, how many birds do they see together?

RandomMix of Counters

Strategy 2

COMMON ERROR: Use theWrong Operation

4

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Module 6

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LESSON 4

Connect Concepts and Skills

Lesson 4

Name

Connect Concepts and Skills

Represent Total Unknown Problems with a Visual Model I Can make a visual model to solve word problems when the total is unknown. Spark Your Learning Ayden sees 9 robins. Gina sees 5 robins.

1 Spark Your Learning MOTIVATE Read the problem to the class. Encourage children to share any birds they have seen or know. SUPPORT SENSE-MAKING Three Reads Read the problem three times for children. Ask children a different question shown in the Three Reads box below for a different focus each time. PERSEVERE If children need support, guide them by asking: Q Assessing   What are you asked to do? Tell me in your own words. Find how many robins Ayden and Gina see. Q Advancing • Use Tools  Which tool could you use to solve the problem? Why is the tool you chose the one that works for you? Children's choices of strategies or tools will vary. Q Advancing  How can you show this problem? I can show that Ayden sees 9 robins by using 9 counters and that Gina sees 5 robins by using 5 counters. Q Advancing  What would you do to solve this problem? Possible answer: I want to find how many robins Ayden and Gina see, so I would add. Q Advancing  How many robins do Ayden and Gina see? 14 robins

How many robins do they see? Show how to solve the problem.

Check children’s work.

PAIRS

Read the problem to children. Have children solve the problem and draw to show their thinking.

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SUPPORT SENSE-MAKING • Three Reads

Turn and Talk  How does your drawing help you understand how to solve the problem? 

Possible answer: My drawing helps me understand how to add the numbers together. My drawing helps me see how to make a ten to add the numbers.

Read the problem stem three times and prompt the children with a different question each time. 1 What is the problem about?  Ayden and Gina see robins. 2 What do each of the numbers describe? 9 is the number of robins Ayden sees, and 5 is the number of robins Gina sees. 3 What math questions could you ask about the problem?  Possible questions: How many robins did Ayden see? How many robins did Gina see? How many robins did they see in all?

BUILD SHARED UNDERSTANDING Select children who used various strategies and tools to share with the class how they solved the problem. Have children discuss why they chose a specific strategy or tool.

181

Lesson 6.4

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2 Learn Together Build Understanding

Build Understanding There are 6 cats and 7 kittens playing with yarn. How many cats and kittens altogether are playing with yarn? A How can you use a concrete model and bar model to show this problem?

Task 1 MP Reason  Help children think about how the numbers relate to the bar model. Children are being introduced to bar models for the first time. Show children how to read the bar model. Sample Guided Discussion: Q How can you make a concrete model for this problem?  I can use 6 cubes to show cats and 7 cubes to show kittens. Q What do the numbers in the bar model mean?  Possible answer: 6 is the number of cats, 7 is the number of kittens. 13 is the total number of cats and kittens. Turn and Talk Listen to children's responses to ensure they see the connection between the bar model and the concrete model. Possible answer: The bar model helps me see the problem and understand the answer.

Check children’s work.

6

7

13

B How does your concrete model match the bar model?

The 6 in the left box matches the 6 cubes that stand for the cats. The 7 in the right box matches the 7 cubes that stand for the kittens. The 13 is the total number of cubes.

C How many cats and kittens altogether are playing with yarn? cats and kittens 13

OPTIMIZE OUTPUT Stronger and Clearer

Turn and Talk How does a bar model help you understand the problem?

As children share their Turn and Talk responses with a partner, remind them to ask questions of each other that focus on how to use a bar model. Then have them refine their answers.

See possible answer at the left.

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LEVELED QUESTIONS

Depth of Knowledge (DOK)

Leveled Questions

What Does This Tell You?

Level 1 Recall

How can you use a bar model to explain this problem? The 6 and 7 in the bars represent the cats and kittens in the problem. The 13 is the total and the solution to the problem. Where would you place the numbers from this problem in a bar model: Tim sees 5 red apples and 7 green apples. How many apples does he see? 5 and 7 would go in the bars and the total, 12, would go in the space below. In the problem above, Ava put 5 and 12 in the bars and 7 below the bar model. Explain what she did wrong.  Possible answer: Ava should put the addends, 5 and 7, in the bars and the total, 12, below the bar model.

Children’s answers to this question will demonstrate that they understand how the problem can be organized on the bar model.

Level 2 Basic Application of Skills & Concepts

Children’s answers to this question will show conceptual understanding of how a bar model is organized.

Level 3  Strategic Thinking & Complex Reasoning

Children’s answers to this question will demonstrate their understanding of the error in the thinking and how to fix the error.

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Name

Step It Out

Step It Out 1

Task 2 MP Model with Mathematics  Help children connect the bar model to the equation they write. Read the problem aloud. Remind children this kind of problem is called a Put Together/Take Apart Total Unknown problem. They have solved these problems before. Now they are going to use a bar model to help solve the problem. Sample Guided Discussion: Q What is this problem asking you to find?  how many boxes of popcorn the movie theater has Q What information do you know?  how many large boxes of popcorn and how many small boxes of popcorn the movie theater has Q How does the bar model connect to the concrete model?  Possible answer: The numbers of cubes in the concrete model are the same as the numbers in the boxes in the bar model. The total number of cubes is the sum, or bottom number, in the bar model. Q How can you use the bar model to write an equation to solve this problem?  5 and 7 are the addends and go in the bars; 12 is the total. The equation is 5 + 7 = 12.

A movie theater has 5 large boxes of popcorn and 7 small boxes of popcorn. How many boxes of popcorn are there? Use a bar model to solve this problem. A Use . Make a concrete model to match the bar model. Color to show what you did. Write the total.

Check children’s work.

5

7

12

B Use the bar model to help you write an equation that solves the problem. Equation: 5 + 7 = 12

12

C There are

boxes of popcorn.

Turn and Talk How does each part of the bar model represent the problem?

Turn and Talk  Listen to children to ensure that they understand the spatial relationships of the

See possible answer at the right.

organization of the bar model, particularly that they understand that the number on the bottom is the total, and not just the answer. The top bars are the addends, 5 and 7, and the bottom number, 12, is the total.

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CULTIVATE CONVERSATION Stronger and Clearer

Have children share their work. Remind children to ask questions of each other that focus on explaining what each bar in the bar model represents. Then have children refine their answers.

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Lesson 6.4

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2 Learn Together Step It Out

Step It Out 2

Anna has 4 boxes of juice. Rick has 7 boxes of juice. Howmany boxes of juice do they have? A Write howmany boxes of juice each child has in the bar model. Then write the total.

Task 3 MP Model with Mathematics  Discuss with children how the numbers in the bar model connect with the equation they write. Read and discuss the problem. Sample Guided Discussion: Q What numbers go into the top bars of the bar model?  the number of boxes of juice Anna and Rick have, 4 and 7 Q Where will the answer be, and why?  The answer will be on the bottom because I am looking for the total, and that’s where the bar model shows the total. Q How can you describe the process of using the bar model to write an equation that matches the problem?  4 and 7 are the addends, and 11 is the total. The numbers in the boxes and the total in the bar model tell me what numbers to use in the equation.

4

7

11

B Use the bar model to write an equation that solves the problem. Equation: Anna and Rick have boxes of juice. Possible equation: 4 + 7 = 11 11 Check Understanding Math Board Use a bar model to solve the problem. 1 Jesse has 3 pears and 9 apples. How many pears and apples does he have altogether?

3

9

12

pears and apples. Possible equation: 3 + 9 = 12 12

Equation: Jesse has

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3 Check Understanding

4 Differentiation Options

Formative Assessment

Differentiate instruction for all children using small-group mini-lessons and math center activities on page 181C.

Use formative assessment to determine if your children are successful with this lesson's learning objectives.

DONOTEDIT--Changesmustbemade through“File info” CorrectionKey=NL-A Reteach

DONOTEDIT--Changesmustbemade through“File info” CorrectionKey=NL-A Challenge

LESSON 6.4 Reteach

LESSON 6.4 Challenge

Name

Name

Children who successfully complete the Check Understanding can continue to the On Your Own practice.

Represent Total Unknown Problems with a Visual Model

Feeding Fish It isKyra’s turn to feed theclass fish.The fish need10piecesof foodover twodays. Use thebarmodel to solve.Writean equation.Circle theproblemwith thecorrect amountof food. 1 8piecesonMondayand4pieces onTuesday Equation: 8 + 4 = 12 Checkchildren’swork.

Youcanuseavisualmodel to solveproblemswhen the total isunknown. Petehas4crayonsand6coloredpencils.Howmanycrayons andcoloredpencilsaltogetherdoeshehave?

For children who missed the Check Understanding problem, work in a pulled small group with the Tabletop Flipchart Mini-Lesson.

8

4

crayons

pencils

12

4

6

2 3piecesonMondayand5pieces onTuesday Equation: 3 5piecesonMondayand6pieces onTuesday Equation: 4 6piecesonMondayand4pieces onTuesday Equation: 5 4piecesonMondayand5pieces onTuesday Equation: 3 + 5 = 8 5 + 6 = 11 6 + 4 = 10 4 + 5 = 9

3

5

10

+ 4 6 10 =

8

Equation:

10

crayonsandpencils

5

6

Useabarmodel to solve theproblem. Write theequation. 1 Janpicks10 redapplesand 7greenapples.Howmanydoes shehavealtogether? + = apples 2 Ellahas5comicbooksandher brotherhas11.Howmanydo theyhavealtogether? + = comic books 10 7 17 5 11 16

Assign the Digital Check Understanding to determine • success with the learning objective • items to review • grouping and dierentiation resources

11

10

7

6

4

ONL INE

17

10

5

11

4

5

16

9

seventy-seven 77

78 seventy-eight

Module6 • Lesson4

Module 6 • Lesson 4

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ONL INE

Assign the Digital On Your Own for • built-in student supports • Actionable Item Reports • Standards Analysis Reports

Name

On Your Own Color the cubes to match the bar model. Then write an equation to solve. 2 MP Model with Mathematics There are 5 big dogs and 8 little dogs at the park. How many dogs are at the park?

On Your Own Problem 2 • Model with Mathematics Children color cubes, complete a bar model, and write an equation to solve a Put Together/Take Apart Total Unknown problem. Problem 3 • Open Ended Children complete a bar model and write a story problem to describe the given bar model.

5

8

13

dogs at the dog park. Possible equation: 5 + 8 = 13 13

Equation: There are

3 Open Ended Complete the bar model. Write a story problem to match the bar model.

7

9

16

Check children’s work.

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Assignment Guide Reference the chart below for problems associated with tasks. In a 2-day lesson, reference the chart to assign daily homework.

Learn Together Tasks On Your Own Problems

Task 1, p. 182

Problem 2

Task 2, p. 183

Problems 3 and 4

Task 3, p. 184

Problem 5

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Lesson 6.4

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ONL INE

Assign the Digital On Your Own for • built-in student supports • Actionable Item Reports • Standards Analysis Reports

MP Model with Mathematics Use a bar model to solve the problem. 4 There are 8 school buses and 9 cars outside. How many buses and cars are outside?

On Your Own Problems 4 and 5 • Model with Mathematics Children complete bar models and write equations to show and solve Put Together/Take Apart Total Unknown word problems. 5 Wrap-Up Summarize learning with your class. Consider using the Exit Ticket, Put It in Writing, or I Can scale. Exit Ticket  Clara sees 9 ants. Jose sees 4 ants. How many ants do they see in all? Complete a bar model and write an equation to solve the problem. Provide a blank bar model for children to complete. Possible answer: 9 + 4 = 13 13 ants in all Put It inWriting  There are 4 big trees and 7 small trees in the park. How many trees are there? Complete a bar model and write an equation to solve the problem. I Can  The scale below can help you and your students understand their progress on a learning goal. 9 4 13

8

9

17

buses and cars outside. Possible equation: 8 + 9 = 17 17

Equation: There are

5 There are 6 large dolls and 7 small dolls. How many dolls are there?

6

7

13

Possible equation: 6 + 7 = 13 13

Equation: There are

dolls.

I’m in a Learning Mindset!

What tools can I use to solve Problem 4?

Keep Going to Practice and Homework Journal

186 one hundred eighty-six

1_mnlese002130_m06l04.indd 186 Get Help  Identifies Sources of Help Have children identify at least one tool they can use to solve Problem 4. Did you use a bar model, drawing, objects, or more than one tool to solve the problem? The great thing about knowing how to use different types of tools to solve problems is that if one tool works, you can stick with it. But if that tool does not work, you can always try something else! Learning Mindset

15/03/19 10:30 AM

I can explain how a visual model and an equation represent the information in the problem and what each number means.

4

I can make a visual model to solve word problems when the total is unknown.

3

I can use a visual model to solve a word problem where the total is unknown.

2

I can use a concrete model to to solve a word problem where the total is unknown.

1

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ONL INE

Assign the Digital More Practice/ Homework for

LESSON 6.4 More Practice/ Homework

Name

• built-in student supports • Actionable Item Reports • Standards Analysis Reports

Represent Total Unknown Problems with a Visual Model Use a bar model to solve the problem. 1 Matthew sees 9 plants with white flowers and 8 plants with pink flowers in a garden. How many plants does he see?

Video Tutorials and Interactive Examples ONLINE Video Tutorials and Interactive Examples

ONLINE

More Practice/Homework Represent Total Unknown Problems with a Visual Model Use More Practice/Homework pages to provide children with additional practice applying the concepts and skills presented in the lesson. Problem 1 • STEM  Flowers are very important to helping plants make new plants. The pollen on plants, which is needed to grow new plants, is moved from one plant to another by wind, bees, and butterflies. Brightly colored flowers attract the bees and butterflies. Children use a bar model to write an equation to solve the problem. Problem 2 • Open Ended  Children complete the bar model and write a story problem to match the bar model.

9

8

17

Possible equation: 9 + 8 = 17 17

Equation: Matthew sees

plants.

2 Open Ended Complete the bar model. Write a story problem to match the bar model.

Check children’s work.

8

4

12

sixty-nine P69

Module 6 • Lesson 4

1_mnlepb110996_m06l04p.indd 69 Assignment Guide Reference the chart below for problems associated with tasks. In a 2-day lesson, reference the chart to assign daily homework.

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Learn Together Tasks

More Practice/Homework Problems

Task 1, p. 182

Problem 1

Task 2, p. 183

Problems 2 and 3

Task 3, p. 184

Problem 4

186A

Lesson 6.4

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Test Prep The Test Prep items provided assess understanding of how to use a bar model to solve Put Together/Take Apart Total Unknown problems. Additional Test Prep opportunities are available online and in the Getting Ready for High Stakes Assessment . Spiral Review The spiral review problem will help determine if children have retained information taught in the past. Here, children will need to demonstrate an ability to add 3 numbers together. (3.3)

Test Prep Use a bar model to solve the problem.

3 Jasmine has 7 toy lions and 6 toy tigers. How many toy lions and tigers does Jasmine have in all? Use a bar model to solve the problem.

6

7

13

toy lions and tigers.

Jasmine has

4 Use the bar model. Fill in the bubble of the equation that describes the problem.

3

8

11

8 − 3 = 5

3 + 8 = 11

9 + 3 = 12

Spiral Review Solve two ways. Circle to group the two addends you will add first. 5 6 + 2 + 4 = + = So 6 + 2 + 4 = 6 6 12 12

P70 seventy

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186B

Module 6

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ONL INE

MODULE 6

Assign the Digital Module Review for • built-in student supports • Actionable Item Reports • Standards Analysis Reports

Module 6 Review Name Concept and Skills Use a bar model to solve the problem. 1 Andy reports the weather for 14 days. 6 of the days are rainy. The rest of the days are sunny. How many days are sunny?

Module Review Use the Module Review as practice and review of the module’s content. Concepts and Skills MP Use Tools  Prior to assigning the Module Review, help children list the strategies or tools used throughout the module. As each is listed, guide children to think about how they might use each strategy or tool to solve a problem. As children start the review, read Item 2. Remind children of the list of tools used in the module. Ask them to think of a strategy or a tool that could be used to solve the problem. After children have completed the review, discuss Item 2 and ask a child to show his or her solution with the strategy or tool used. Have children who used a different tool share their solutions.

6

8

14

sunny days. Possible equation: 14 − 6 = 8 8

Equation: There are

Draw to show the problem. Write an equation to solve. 2 Sonia sees 6 orange fish and 5 blue fish in a fish tank. How many fish are in the tank?

Possible drawing:

Possible equation: 6 + 5 = 11

Equation: There are

11

fish in the tank.

203

Module 6

two hundred three

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DATA-DRIVEN INSTRUCTION

Before moving on to the Module Test, use the Module Review results to intervene based on the table below.

RtI MTSS

Item Lesson DOK

Content Focus

Intervention

1

6.5

2

Use a visual model to solve a Put Together/Take Apart Addend Unknown problem.

Reteach 6.5

2

6.1

3

Show and solve a Put Together Total Unknown problem.

Reteach 6.1

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Module 6

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Module Review continued Possible Scoring Guide

Draw to show the problem. Solve. 3 Kevin has 15 marbles. Some are green and some are blue. How many marbles could be green and how many marbles could be blue? Possible answer shown. Check children’s work.

Items Points Description

1

completes one part correctly

1

2

answers all parts of problem correctly

1

1

completes one part correctly

2

2

answers all parts of problem correctly

2

1

completes one of the two parts correctly

7

8

3

green marbles

blue marbles

2

answers all parts of problem correctly

3 4

Fill in the bubble next to the correct answer. 4 Sophie sees 10 kittens. 3 kittens are black and the rest are orange. How many kittens are orange? Choose the bar model that shows the problem.

2

selects the correct visual model

Total points possible = 8 points

The Unit 2 Performance Task in the Assessment Guide assesses content from Modules 5–8.

10

3

13

8

3

11

3

7

10

204 two hundred four

Module 6

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DATA-DRIVEN INSTRUCTION

Before moving on to the Module Test, use the Module Review results to intervene based on the table below.

RtI MTSS

Item Lesson DOK

Content Focus

Intervention

3

6.2

2

Show and solve a Put Together/Take Apart Both Addends Unknown problem. Identify a way to solve a Put Together/Take Apart Addend Unknown problem.

Reteach 6.2

4

6.6

2

Reteach 6.6

204

Module 6

ONL INE

MODULE 6

Assign the Digital Module Test to power actionable reports including • proficiency by standards • item analysis

Module Test The Module Test is available in alternative versions in your Assessment Guide. The print versions are available in your Assessment Guide.

DO NOT EDIT--Changes must be made through "File info" CorrectionKey=NL-B

Form A

Form A

Module 6 • Form A Module Test

Name

Module 6 • Form A Module Test

Name

4 Grace has 9 pet fish. She gets 4 more fish. How many fish does Grace have now? fish 5 Gia sees 12 buses. She sees 7 buses drive away. How many buses does Gia see now? buses 13 5

7 Nora has some

1 Avery has 8 red leaves. She finds 4 yellow

2 Which bar model could be used to solve this

seashells. She gives her friend 5 seashells. Now Nora has 6 seashells. How many seashells did Nora have to start? Circle 2 equations that can be used to solve the problem. 6 − 5 = − 5 = 6 5 + 6 = 8 Ariana and Jack each have some ducklings. They have 13 ducklings altogether. How many ducklings could each of them have? Use the bar model to solve the problem.

leaves. Which set of counters shows how many leaves Avery has now?

equation? 15 − 9 =

9

15

9

15

15

6 Caleb counts 8 purple hats and 2 green hats. How many hats does Caleb count?

9

3 There are 16 children on the rug. There are 7 children standing. The rest are sitting. How many children are sitting on the rug? 16 = + 7 children 9 9

Write an equation to solve the problem.

+ Possible answer: 8 10 2 hats

=

10

Possible answer:

7

6

13

52

Grade 1 • Module 6 Test • Form A

51

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Form B

Form B

Module 6 • Form B Module Test

Module 6 • Form B Module Test

Name

Name

1 Matthew has 7 red

2 Which bar model could be used to solve this

4 Daniel's chickens laid 6 eggs in one week. The next week they laid 5 more eggs. How many eggs did Daniel's chickens lay altogether? eggs 5 Kevin sees 13 boats. He sees 5 of the boats sail away. How many boats are there for Kevin to see now? boats 6 Amy counts 6 black squirrels and 6 red squirrels. How many squirrels does Amy count? Write an equation to solve the problem. + = squirrels 11 8 6 6 12 12

7 Lukas has some pennies. He gives his sister 3 pennies. Now Lukas has 8 pennies. How many pennies did Lukas have to start? Circle 2 equations that can be used to solve the problem.

apples. He has 6 yellow apples. Which set of counters shows how many apples Matthew has?

equation? 17 − 8 =

17

8

8

3 + 8 = 8 − 3 =

17

− 3 = 8

8

17

8 Julian and Carol each have some stickers. They have 15 stickers altogether. How many stickers could each of them have? Use the bar model to solve the problem.

3 Scarlett put 14 buttons in her basket. There are 7 big buttons. The rest of the buttons are little. How many little buttons are in Scarlett's basket? 14 = + 7 buttons 7 7

Possible answer: 7 8

15

Grade 1 • Module 6 Test • Form B

53

54

204A

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Module 6

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