Simplot - Spring 2019

Spring 2019

Stockmen’s Report

223 Rodeo Ave. Caldwell, ID 83605 | 208-459-0777 | www.simplot.com/livestock_products

THE KEY TO FLY CONTROL Great communication with our customers is key to our success as a business. It is our goal to keep you more informed than ever with this seasonal newsletter!

Ty Cochran Shares His Expertise

As part of my job at Central Life Sciences, I’ve become a bit of an expert on fly control. Traveling to ranches and dairies around the country and teaching folks how to use our line of Starbar products, I’m surprised at just how many livestock operations have all but surrendered to the flying menace. While there’s no silver bullet for keeping these pests out of your barn, you can eliminate up to 90 percent of the problem by undertaking a holistic fly-control program. It all starts with good housekeeping. Puddles, manure piles, the cute bit of dribble coming from a calf’s mouth — these are all staples of life on a farm, but they’re also part of an ideal fly habitat. Flies are living creatures, meaning they need food, water, and shelter to survive. Keeping a clean barn is the first step to making your farm inhospitable to pests. Spotting all these problem areas can be difficult, especially if they’ve existed for a long time. It’s a bit like when you leave a pair of socks on the floor in your bedroom for an extended period. Eventually, you don’t see a mess anymore. It’s just part of the landscape. That’s why it’s a good idea to train up a few farmhands as the go-to fly-control experts on your team. By learning to identify potential fly habitats, these hands can see the property with fresh eyes and eliminate problem areas as they spring up. These same experts can then oversee the maintenance of the rest of your fly-control program. Obviously, no barn will ever be spotless. Troughs spill, rain falls, and cows … well. If a fly can find a place to breed, it will, and each fly can lay up to 20 eggs per day. That’s why fly control needs to be a complete program, not just one product. With proper placement, baits, strips, traps, and sprays will neutralize many of the flies that do manage to take up residence in your barn. The key is putting the right product in the right place.

You can tell a lot about what a fly is up to depending on where you find it. If it’s clinging to the ceiling, it’s resting and enjoying the fresher air at the top of the barn. This is where fly ribbons and sticks are most effective. They present a bright-colored place for the insects to land as they’re looking to rest their wings. Flies bumbling around at eye level are most likely looking to mate, so you’ll want to place odor- and pheromone-based traps here. When a fly is at low level, it’s looking to eat, and that’s where you want to scatter baits and abatement strips to lure them away from livestock and ensure their next meal is their last. Even when you have the right trap in the right area, you may still have to experiment to find the perfect spot. Heck, I hung a ribbon from the ceiling of my own home in what I thought was the perfect place and didn’t catch a single fly. After adjusting the placement by 10 feet, the trap was overflowing with them. My wife still hasn’t let me hear the end of that one. I won’t sugarcoat it: Establishing an effective fly-control program takes work, and it has to be maintained. But doing it right is more than worth it. Not only will fly control impact your bottom line by reducing disease and leaving you with happier, more productive livestock, but it will also vastly improve the quality of life for everyone on your team. Farm work is hard, but things get vastly more difficult when you have flies on your face and neck every two seconds. How many jobs are left half done because flies have rendered every second of barn work unbearable? This doesn’t have to be the case. A proper fly-control system can minimize the airborne pests in your barn and make for happier animals and humans alike.

-Ty Cochra n

Simplot Western Stockmen’s | 1

My name is Curtiss Ickes, and I live in Kennewick, Washington. I am the Simplot Western Stockmen’s beef sales representative for Eastern Washington. When I am not working, I enjoy hunting, sporting events, and spending time with the family. I grew up in Washington and spent most of my life on a ranch around cattle. Cattle ranching is a passion of mine, and I am thankful to be involved in such a wonderful industry. I have worked for Simplot Western Stockmen’s for almost three years now, and I continue to learn new things about the cattle industry the longer I work here. We are vertically integrated as a company, which gives us a unique perspective. Whether our customer is a cow/calf producer, stocker, or feedlot owner, we understand their struggles and needs because we face the same battles. Being on the beef side of the industry, I get a chance to see a vast number of different operations. I look forward to each day because I get to see how each operation is different and help solve new problems. Meet Cur

Doc Talks: Calf Stress and Spring Branding

It’s once again time for spring branding and calf stress is something on everyone’s mind.

Some vaccines cause more stress than others. One way to make brandings less stressful for calves is to use low-stress vaccines that still give immunity for disease. Keep an eye on Gram-negative vaccines such as Pink Eye, Pasteurella, Mannheimia, and Haemophilus that create stress and can cause reactions. Do not give more than one or two of these vaccines at the same time. If you have a program that has worked for you in past years, you may not want to change it. It is important that you review your programs each year and verify whether or not they meet your buyer’s standards. Some buyers are requiring the use of certain vaccines that weren’t previously required, and it would be a shame to lose a sale because of complacency. In Idaho, basic branding programs include Clostridium vaccines, such as a 7- or 8-way vaccine. Respiratory viral vaccines are also common, and they include live or killed vaccines. It’s important to understand that killed vaccines do not create immunity until another dose of viral vaccine is administered. Modified live vaccines may be injected or given intranasally, and some protocols call for a combination of both. Intranasal vaccines are effective and low stress, but they may not give long-lasting immunity. Cow nutrition and proper supplementation during pregnancy can greatly impact a calf’s ability to develop good immunity. I’ve seen some producers use Bo-Se or MulitiMin at birth and/or at branding. These appear to help calf health, especially in areas that are deficient in trace minerals or have high antagonistic minerals in forages. Molybdenum, iron, and sulfur are the most common deficiencies in the West.

-Dick Fredrickson, DVM

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tiss Ickes It’s very useful that we are a one-stop shop. The customer can lean on me for any need they have: animal health, supplements, hardware, or even dog food. I really feel like working for Simplot gives me the freedom, knowledge, and support I need to help customers solve their problems or concerns. When I’m not selling something but providing customers with product knowledge and expertise, I become a valuable resource and part of their operation. At the end of the day, my goal is to help my customers be as successful as possible. Feel free to contact me at any time with any questions or challenges you face in your operation, and I will make it my priority to get it done.

Curtiss Ickes Simplot Western Stockmen’s Sunnyside Sales Representative 509-426-0737 Curtiss.Ickes@simplot.com

COWBOY BEEF STEW

Ingredients

• 2 1/2 pounds beef stew meat, cut into 1-inch pieces • 1 package (12–14 ounces) dried bean soup mix with seasoning packet (not quick-cooking) • 2 cans (14 1/2-ounces each) diced tomatoes with green peppers and onion • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil • 1 can (14 ounces) beef broth • 3 cups frozen diced or hash brown potatoes (optional) • Salt and pepper

Directions

1. Soak beans in water overnight in refrigerator according to package directions. Reserve seasoning packet. 2. Coat beef with seasoning from reserved packet. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in large stockpot over medium heat until hot. Brown 1/3 of beef and remove from stockpot. Repeat twice with remaining oil and beef, adding additional oil as needed. 3. Pour off drippings and return beef to stockpot. Drain beans and discard water. Add beans, tomatoes, and beef broth to stockpot. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and cover tightly. Simmer 1 3/4 to 2 1/4 hours or until beef is fork tender. 4. Stir in potatoes, if desired. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and continue simmering, uncovered, for 5–7 minutes or until potatoes are tender, stirring occasionally. Season with salt and pepper as desired.

www.beefitswhatsfordinner.com

Simplot Western Stockmen’s | 3

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID BOISE, ID PERMIT 411

223 Rodeo Ave. Caldwell, ID 83605 208-459-0777 | www.simplot.com

Inside

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The Buzz on Fly Control

Calf Stress and Spring Branding

Meet Curtiss Ickes

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Cowboy Beef Stew

Common Spring Vaccination Schedule

Common Spring Vaccination Schedule For Healthy Adult Animals Co on Spring Vaccination Schedule For Healthy Adult Animals Common Spring Vaccination Schedule For Healthy Adult Animals

Eastern & Western Encephalomyelitis Tetanus West Nile Spring (1x year) Equine Eastern & Western Encephalomyelitis Tetanus West Nile Influenza Potomac Horse Fever Strangles EHE V-1 & EHV-4 (Rhino) Spring (1x year) Equine 2x year astern & Western Encephalomyelitis Tetanus West Nile Influenza Potomac Horse Fever Strangles EHV-1 & EHV-4 (Rhino) Spring (1x year) Equine 2x year Influenza Potomac Horse Fever Strangles EHV-1 & EHV-4 (Rhino) 2x year

Leptospirosis Influenza H3N2 Influenza H3N8 Corona Virus Spring (1x year) Canine Leptospirosis Influenza H3N2 Influenza 3 8 Corona Virus Spring (1x year) Canine Leptospirosis I H N2 Influenza H3N8 Corona Virus Spring (1x year) Canine

FeLV (Feline leukemia Virus) Chlamydiosis (or pneumonitis) Bordetella bronchiseptica Spring (1x year) Feline FeLV (Feline leukemia Virus) Chlamydiosis (or pneumonitis) Bordetella bronchiseptica Spring (1x year) Feline FeLV (Feline leukemia Virus) Chlamydiosis (or pneumonitis) Bordetella bronchiseptica Spring (1x year) Feline ***Rabies FCVRP (feline viral rhinotracheitis, calicivirus and panleukopenia) Every 3 years ***Rabies FCVRP (feline viral rhinotracheitis, calicivirus and panleukopenia) Every 3 years ***Rabies FCVRP (feline viral rhinotracheitis, calicivirus and panleukopenia) Every 3 years

CD&T (Clostridium perfringens & Tetanus) Chlamydia Psittaci (for breeding stock) Campylobacter (for breeding stock) Caseous Lymphandentitis (where CL is already present) Spring (1x year) Goats & Sheep CD&T (Clostridium perfringens & Tetanus) Chlamydia Psittaci (for breeding stock) Campylobacter (for breeding stock) Caseous Lymphandentitis (where CL is already present) + Spring (1x year) Goats & Sheep CD&T (Clostridium perfringens & Tetanus) Chlamydia Psittaci (for breeding stock) Campylobacter (for breeding stock) Caseous Lymphandentitis (where CL is already present) + Spring (1x year) oats heep +

+ + + + + +

+ + +

2x year 2x year 2x year

+ + +

Bordatella Bordatella Bordatella

+ + + + + + + + +

***Rabies DHPP (Distemper, Every 3 years ***Rabies DHPP (Distemper, Hepatitis, Adenovirus 1 & 2, Parvovirus, Parainfluenza) Every 3 years ***Rabies DHPP (Distemper, Hepatitis, Adenovir s 1 & 2, Parvovirus, Parainfluenza) Every 3 years Hepatitis, Adenovirus 1 & 2, Parvovirus, Parainfluenza)

+ +

This chart is meant to be used as a helpful reminder and organizational tool. Many of these vaccines are Risk based; ask your local animal health expert or vet about your animal’s risk & the need for vaccination in your area. For young, sick, or previously unvaccinated animals consult your vet. *** Rabies vaccination laws vary by state. Some states require vaccination every year and must be given by a vet. STORE LOCATIONS: Caldwell Store | 208-459-0806 | 101 Rodeo Ave. Caldwell, ID 83605 • Burley Store | 208-878-7224 | 1001 W. Main St. Burley, ID 83318 • Jerome Store | 208-733-6145 | 1100 W. Main St. Jerome, ID 83338 • Sunnyside Store | 509-836-0267 | 304 Yakima Valley Highway Sunnyside, WA 98944 This chart is meant to be used as a helpful reminder and organizational tool. Many of these vaccines are Risk based; ask your local animal health expert o vet abou y ur animal’s risk & the need fo vaccination in your area. For oung, sick, or pr viously unvaccinated animals consult your vet. *** Rabies vaccination laws vary by state. Some states require vaccination every year and must be given by a vet. This chart is meant to be used as a helpful reminder and organizational tool. Many of these vaccines are Risk based; ask your local animal health expert or vet about your animal’s risk & the need for vaccination in your area. For young, sick, or previously unvaccinated animals consult your vet. *** Rabies vaccination laws vary by state. Some states require vaccination every year and must be given by a vet. +

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