The Howard School | Sixth Form Prospectus

The Howard School Sixth Form Prospectus

Table of

Welcome to

Contents

The Howard School It gives me great pleasure to welcome you to The Howard School Sixth Form. As you approach the end of Year 11 you arrive at a key point in your education, and need to plan carefully for your future. This document provides you with advice and information about what we can offer you in the next phase of your education at The Howard School. Our most recent Ofsted visit confirmed that we are a very good school and that the quality of education available to the sixth form is very good. Inspectors specifically noted that “sixth form students achieve well in academic and vocational courses, making good progress across a variety of subject areas by the end of Year 13”, and also that “leaders help post-16 students to develop their independence and play a greater role in the life of the school.” Our results in the Sixth Form, as at GCSE, have continued to improve year on year to ensure that the progress our students make is substantial. We offer excellent teaching across all subject areas to ensure this happens. In addition, our new £5million Science and Technology building (opening September 2021) is the first stage in ensuring our facilities better match the quality of teaching in the school. The Sixth Form represents a traditional stage that links education at school to the next phase of your life. Our aim is to provide the opportunities and environment which will enable every one of you to reach your academic potential and gain the skills which will enable you to proceed to higher education or employment and lead fulfilled, successful lives. In choosing to join our Sixth Form, you should be prepared to assume a greater responsibility for your own learning and provide a positive example for younger students. We will support you in doing this. Your choice of Sixth Form is an important one: the decision you make now isn’t just about the next few years, it’s about the rest of your life. In choosing The Howard School you choose the things that are important for your future: committed teaching staff, good facilities, and a strong academic and personal development programme. We want to embody the virtues that The Howard School stands for: respect, pride, ambition, resilience and integrity.

Head Teacher’s Welcome

Page 2

Welcome from the Head of Sixth Form

Page 3

Application Process Timeline

Page 4

Application Process

Page 5

Routes of Study

Page 6

What are A Level Qualifications?

Page 7

What are Applied General Qualifications?

Page 8

Enrichment Opportunities

Page 9

Sixth Form Entry Requirements – Academic Qualifications

Page 10

Sixth Form Entry Requirements – Applied General Qualifications

Page 11

Courses

Page 12

We look forward to welcoming you to our Sixth Form community.

Ms C Reid, Executive Headteacher

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Welcome From

Application Process Timeline

The Head of Sixth Form

Welcome to The Howard School Sixth Form and thank you for considering us as your school for the next two years of your education.

Month / Year

Event

We are a very ‘Good’ school, with a vast range of courses on offer at Level 3 to meet the needs and aspirations of all learners, and a specialism in Sports. We are able to offer 17 Academic courses and 14 Applied General courses at Level 3, providing an extensive offer that few other schools can match. At The Howard School we pride ourselves in all aspects of student’s education, not just academic outcomes but also through the extensive pastoral and enrichment programme that we offer. As a sixth form member you will receive a Progress Tutor, a comprehensive mentoring programme and have access to a vast range of enrichment opportunities. These opportunities include foreign visits, work experience, becoming a senior prefect and studying for the Extended Project Qualification, to name but a few. Ultimately, whether you are a student looking to go onto university, an apprenticeship or employ - ment we have the expertise and experience to guide you every step of the way. Our on-site careers adviser will be able to guide you through the process of applying for apprenticeships, arranging work experience and supporting you with the job application process, whilst our experienced Sixth Form team and partnership links with local universities will guide you through the UCAS process for a smooth transition to university. We believe that The Howard School offers students the opportunity to create a timetable that meets their needs, interests and aspirations for the future, in an environment that nurtures, encourages and delivers. We look forward to receiving your application and welcoming you to our Sixth Form in September 2021.

December 2020

Sixth Form Promotional Event goes live.

Friday 29th January – Deadline for the submission of application forms to The Howard School.

January 2021

The Howard School requests internal and external references for applications received. Letters to interview are sent to applicants.

January/February 2021

Interview process commences. Applicants will be advised in writing of the date and time.

February 2021

Conditional offer letters are sent to successful applicants.

March 2021

In short our main goals are: • To offer an extensive range of Level 3 academic and applied general courses

Sixth Form Induction: Dates TBC

July 2021

• To deliver outstanding pastoral support • To provide tailored careers guidance • To obtain a Grade 5 in English and Mathematics • To ensure all Sixth Form teaching is ‘good’ and ‘outstanding’ • To offer an extensive range of enrichment activites

August 2021

Thursday 26th August – GCSE Results Day.

We are an inclusive sixth form, wishing to provide all students with the opportunity to study at The Howard School. Please make sure you contact us in the first instance on receiving your results, as we will make every effort to accommodate your needs for your future ambitions.

Thursday 2nd September (TBC) – Year 12 commence studies at The Howard School Sixth Form.

September 2021

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The Application Process

Routes

of Study

How many subjects do I select?

At The Howard School, we strive to maximise the success of all our students. We endeavour to provide information and guidance that will best match individual students with the most appropriate courses of study.

You will select 3 subjects. Depending on the route that you take, this may be 3 applied general subjects, 3 academic subjects or a mixture of both. As A-Levels are now linear, examinations occur at the end of Year 13. At The Howard School, departments have the ability to enter students for an AS examination at the end of Year 12 or internally assess student’s progress. Should students sit a formal AS examination, this will be a stand-alone qualification and not form any part of the final A-Level grade.

In broad terms, we will direct students along one of the following routes:

Route 1: Students have achieved a Grade 4 in English OR Maths. In addition, students have achieved a minimum of 4 subjects graded 9-4 at GCSE or Merits at Level 2 Applied General.

How do I apply?

Students will be able to follow a range of select Applied General and Academic courses we have on offer, for which they meet the course specific requirements.

Both internal and external students need to apply by completing the ‘sixth form application form’ found on our website. This can be returned directly to The Howard School or you can apply through the UCAS progress website.

Students will need to re-sit GCSE English or GCSE Maths if below Grade 4.

Applications being returned directly to The Howard School should be addressed to Head of Sixth Form, via the post box in main reception.

Route 2:

Students have achieved a Grade 5 in English OR Maths. In addition, students have achieved a minimum of 5 subjects graded 9-4 at GCSE or Merits at Level 2 Applied General.

When is the application deadline?

Applications should be received by Friday 29th January 2021. After this date you will still have an opportunity to make changes to your application during the interview process in February 2021. Applications received after the deadline date will be held on a waiting list until an interview can be arranged.

Students will be able to follow a range of select Applied General and Academic courses we have on offer, for which they meet the course specific requirements.

Students will need to re-sit GCSE English or GCSE Maths if it is below Grade 4.

When will the interviews be held?

Route 3: Students have achieved a Grade 6 in English or Maths. The other will also be at least Grade 5. In addition, students have achieved a minimum of 6 subjects graded 9-5 at GCSE or Distinctions at Level 2 Applied General.

Interviews will take place during the week commencing 22nd February 2021 for external students and week commencing 1st March 2021 for internal students. Appointment can be made via email to loftuss@thehowardschool.co.uk. Written confirmation of the date and time of the interview will be received in the post. On the Interview day, both internal and external students will need to bring evidence of their current predicted grades for the GCSE subjects that they are studying and a parent/carer will need to be in attendance with you.

Students will be able to follow a range of select Applied General and Academic courses we have on offer, for which they meet the course specific requirements.

*For the full range of course combinations that we offer, please see our school website for more information or alternatively, contact the sixth form team at The Howard School to arrange an appointment to discuss your personal requirements.

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What are A-Level Qualifications?

What are Applied

General Qualifications?

A-Levels (short for Advanced Level) are the traditional qualifications that are offered by schools and colleges for students aged between 16 and 19. They follow GCSEs and generally focus on academic subjects. There are many different A-Level subjects that you can take – some will be subjects that you studied at GCSE and others may be new.

Applied General Qualifications are a new way to categorise a range of existing Level 3 (advanced) vocational qualifications, such as BTEC and OCR Cambridge.

These qualifications have been recognised by many Higher Education Institutions (Universities) as fulfilling entry requirements to a range of HE courses, either in their own right or alongside other Level 3 qualifications.

A-Levels are very highly valued by employers and universities, so they can open up lots of doors to further study and careers.

Some employers and professional or trade bodies have also pledged support for Applied General qualifications.

Which careers require A-Levels?

Working backwards, some careers require you to have a degree, and you need to have certain A-Levels to get a place on that degree.

Who are they for?

Applied General qualifications are for Post 16 students wishing to undertake a broad study of a specific vocational area.

Some common ones are: • Veterinary Science – Biology and one or two subjects from Chemistry, Maths or Physics. • Medicine – Chemistry, Biology and either Maths or Physics.

What Applied General qualifications are available?

• English – English Literature. • Computer Science – Maths. • Dentistry – Chemistry, Biology and either Maths or Physics.

Applied General qualifications include BTECs and OCR Cambridge qualifications as well as a range of other vocational courses.

If you have a certain degree or career in mind, it’s really important that you have a look at the entry requirements to those courses when choosing your A-Levels so you don’t find yourself in a dilemma when applying. If you have no idea what you want to do next, then you’re better off choosing a more general subject. There are some A-Levels that help you to keep your options open. These are known as facilitating subjects and are: • English Literature • History

Applied General qualifications are available in a variety of areas including: • Arts, Media and Publishing

• Business, Administration and Law • Health, Public Services and Care • Information & Communication Technology • Travel and Tourism • Science

• Modern Languages • Classical Languages • Maths and Further Maths

• Physics • Biology

• Chemistry • Geography

The more of these you choose, the more university courses you will find are open to you when you start applying, and if you don’t have a certain degree or career in mind, then it’s definitely worth considering these.

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Enrichment

Entry Requirements

Opportunities

The following enrichment opportunities are available: Sports ambassador, charity committee, work experience, links with major UK banks, Life Skills Company, Senior Prefect, Head Boy/Girl, 6th Form events committee, mentoring programme, school events committee, public speaking/debating, Performing Arts Ambassador. Supervised Study All Sixth Form students are expected to undertake Independent Study as part of their A-Level course. Within the Sixth Form Centre there is a dedicated supervised area set aside for the completion of independent research and homework activities supported by an array of laptop computers. We place a great deal of importance on Independent Study with current research indicating the immense impact this has on student outcomes. This is built into every student’s timetable to complement their option choices. Extended Project Qualification The Extended Project Qualification allows students to independently demonstrate the skills and knowledge that both universities and employers demand from young adults. Our EPQ outcomes are consistently ‘Very Good’ year on year. The Extended Project is a recognised Level 3 course and is highly regarded by Russell Group Universities, allowing students to develop their own learning and performance as critical, reflective and independent learners. The qualification consists of four units, of which students should select 1. • Dissertation • Investigation / Field Study • Performance • Artefact

Students must meet the requirements of Route 1, 2 or 3 in addition to the individual entry requirements of the course as detailed below.

Courses

Course Entry Requirements

Art & Design – Fine Art

Grade 5 GCSE Fine Art or Art & Design

Art & Design – Photographic and Graphic Communication

Grade 5 GCSE Photography, Art & Design or Fine Art

Business Studies

Grade 6 GCSE Business & Grade 5 Maths & English

Criminology

Grade 5 English Language or Literature

Grade 6 English Language or English Literature (if a 6 or higher is achieved in Literature but not Language, Language must be a minimum of a 5) Grade 6 at GCSE English Literature with a minimum of Grade 5 in English Language (if a Grade 5 was achieved in Literature in 2020, a minimum of Grade 6 must be achieved in English Language in 2021)

English Language

English Literature & Language

Film Studies

Grade 5 English Language or Literature

Geography

Grade 6 Geography & Grade 5 English & Maths

History

Grade 6 History & Grade 5 English

Students will be required to complete the following tasks: • AO1: Manage – Identify, design, plan and carry out a project.

Mathematics – Mechanics

Grade 7 Maths

• AO2: Use Resources – Research, critically select and use information and resources effectively. • AO3: Develop and Realise – Select and use a range of skills, including new technologies and problem solving, to take decisions critically and achieve planned outcomes. • AO4: Review–Evaluateall aspects of theextendedproject. Select andusea rangeof communication skills and media to present evidence of outcomes. The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award The Howard School Sixth Form offers students the opportunity to complete the Silver and Gold levels of the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award. Through physical activity, learning or improving new skills, volunteering in the community, expeditions and residential stays at Gold level, the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award provides a truly holistic education for our students, as well as strength and depth to a CV or university application.

Philosophy & Ethics

Grade 5 English

Grade 6 Biology or Grade 6-6 Combined Science, Grade 4 Maths & Grade 4 English (preferable) Grade 6 Chemistry or Grade 6-6 Combined Science, Grade 5 Maths & Grade 4 English (preferable) Grade 6 Physics & Grade 6-6 Combined Science, Grade 5 Maths & Grade 4 English (preferable)

Science – Biology

Science – Chemistry

Science – Physics

Science – Applied Science with Forensics

Grade 5-5 Combined Science

Sociology

Grade 5 English

Careers Guidance – Awarded Investors in careers status The Howard School is fortunate to have its own careers adviser on hand to assist students with the

progression from sixth form into university, employment or an apprenticeship scheme. Our extensive links with external organisations and local universities mean students are receiving accurate and up to date information. Students in Year 12 will also have the opportunity to undertake work experience in the summer term.

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Art & Design A-Level Fine Art

Entry Requirements

Subject Fine Art, Art Craft & Design or 3D Design Exam Board AQA Specification Numbers 7202(c) 7202(x) 7201(c) 7201(x) 7205(c) 7205(x)

Students must meet the requirements of Route 1, 2 or 3 in addition to the individual entry requirements of the course as detailed below.

Teachers Responsible

S Williams, L Bassant

Courses

Course Entry Requirements

Introduction Students will have the opportunity to choose between the three disciplines: Fine Art, Art Craft and Design or 3D Design

Business Studies – BTEC Level 3

Grade 4 English & Maths, Level 2 Merit Business

Students will have the experience of working towards an interchangeable Fine Art or Sculptural brief where they will learn how to use 3D materials such as clay and plaster and investigate different methods and techniques using drawing and painting to successfully communicate a concept. After the initial brief, students will decide which discipline to study. This is a two year linear course with two components: 1. A practical ‘Personal Investigation’ into a specific area of the Arts with an academic written related study (60% of your final grade) 2. An externally set exam (structured around the skills, knowledge and understanding developed throughout the course) with an ‘early release’ question paper giving you time to fully prepare for the final practical exam at the end of the course (40% of your final grade) This Art & Design qualification is the ‘gateway’ option to a career in the Creative Industries, entry to the University of the Creative Arts, and provides valuable UCAS points for other Higher Education Degrees. The wide ranging portfolio that you are required to produce to gain a high grade in Art & Design is the ideal portfolio to gain entry into higher education. After that, a career into any one of the Creative Industries; one of the UK’s fastest growing industries and currently around 9.4% of the UK’s GDP. AO1: Develop ideas through sustained and focused investigations informed by contextual and other sources, demonstrating analytical and critical understanding. AO2: Explore and select appropriate resources, media, materials, techniques and processes, reviewing and refining ideas as work develops. AO3: Record ideas, observations and insights relevant to intentions, reflecting critically on work and progress. AO4: Present a personal and meaningful response that realises intentions and, where appropriate, makes connections between visual and other elements. Graphic design, web & app development, film and animation, set and model design for TV, film and theatre, special effects, architecture and interior design, gaming design, publishing, journalism, fashion and textile design, 3D design, branding, packaging design, text design, editorial, interactive design, advertising.

Financial Studies

Grade 4 English & Maths

Grade 4 Computer Science or Merit Cambridge Nationals Creative iMedia Level 2

ICT – OCR Level 3

Applied Law – BTEC Level 3

Grade 5 English

Grade 4 in one instrument or Merit BTEC Music or Grade 4 GCSE Music

Music – BTEC Level 3

Performing Arts - BTEC National Extended Certificate (Single)

Grade 4 GCSE Drama, Merit Level 2 Performing Arts

Aims of the Course

Performing Arts – BTEC National Diploma (Double)

Grade 4 GCSE Drama, Merit Level 2 Performing Arts

Grade 6 English Language, Grade 6-6 Combined Science

Psychology BTEC

How You Are Assessed

Science – Applied Science with Forensics – BTEC Foundation Diploma

Grade 5-5 Combined Science

Grade 5 Science & Grade 5 English, BTEC Sport Distinction

Sport (Diploma - BTEC Double Award)

Links to Future Careers

Entry Requirement Art & Design or Fine Art GCSE Grade 5

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Art & Design A-Level Photographic/Graphic Communication

Business AS and A-Level Business

Subject Photographic and Graphic Communication Exam Board AQA Specification Numbers 7206(c) 7206(x) 7203(c) 7203(x)

Subject Business Studies

Exam Board Edexcel Specification Numbers 7132

Teachers Responsible

S Williams, L Bassant

Teacher Responsible

Ms Ashbee

Introduction Business Studies is a very wide and complex subject which allows for the appreciation of various contemporary business scenarios. In order to prepare pupils for the rigor of end of year examinations, pupils will be assessed on every topic in each unit. This will take the form of examination style questions including multiple choice, short answer and case study questions. We recommend all prospective pupils start to familiarise themselves with development in business through wider reading. We have found those pupils who immerse themselves in business literature often find it easier to apply business theory to real business examples which helps pupils to achieve highly in examinations.

Introduction Students will have the opportunity to choose between the two disciplines. Students will have the experience of working towards an interchangeable Photography and Graphics brief where they will learn how to use a digital SLR camera, investigate different methods and techniques using draftsmanship, photography, text and digital software to successfully communicate a concept. After the initial brief, students will decide which discipline to study. This is a two year linear course with two components for both Photographic and Graphic Communication: 1. A practical ‘Personal Investigation’ into a specific area of the Arts with an academic written related study (60% of your final grade) 2. An externally set exam (structured around the skills, knowledge and understanding developed throughout the course) with an ‘early release’ question paper giving you time to fully prepare for the final practical exam at the end of the course (40% of your final grade)

Aims of the Course

This course demonstrates the interrelated nature of business through the use of models and theories to support analysis and application to real life business scenarios. Business Studies provides pupils with the opportunity to develop knowledge and skills to critically assess new business developments such as globalisation and digital technology, in order to make strategic business decisions. This is a linear qualification which is divided into AS (Year 1) and A-Level (Year 2)

Aims of the Course

The Graphic and Photographic Communication course is an innovative course that aspires to be at the forefront of the discipline and is an essential component to the modern, multi- media world we live in. This course will equip you with an academically informed skills base and a high quality portfolio that will support your path into Higher Education and employability within the Photographic Communication, Computer Generated Graphics, Fashion, Gaming and Interactive Media & Design Industries including web, app and game design, advertising, packaging design, design for print, illustration, communication graphics, branding, motion graphics and design for film and television. The course will push your perceptions of visual communication, translating complex ideas into inspired, challenging and contemporary photography and graphic design. AO1: Develop ideas through sustained and focused investigations informed by contextual and other sources, demonstrating analytical and critical understanding. AO2: Explore and select appropriate resources, media, materials, techniques and processes, reviewing and refining ideas as work develops. AO3: Record ideas, observations and insights relevant to intentions, reflecting critically on work and progress. AO4: Present a personal and meaningful response that realises intentions. There aremany and varied careers within the Photographic andGraphics Communication, Computer Generated Graphics, Gaming and Interactive Design Industries including Film, TV, Advertising, Gaming, Fashion, Branding, Multimedia Motion Graphics and Packaging Design.

How You Are Assessed

AS Paper 1 - Examination Year 1: 1 hour 30 minutes – 50% of AS AS Paper 2 – Examination Year 1: 1 hour 30 minutes – 50% of AS A2 Paper 1 – Examination Year 2: 2 hours - 35% of A2 A2 Paper 2 – Examination Year 2: 2 hours - 35% of A2 A2 Paper 3 – Examination Year 2: 2 hours - 30% of A2

How You Are Assessed

Links to Future Careers

A-Level Business allows pupils to develop the knowledge and skills required to analyse data, think critically about issues and make strategic decisions. These are all skills which are transferable to any field of study in further education and employment. Previous students have used this qualification to move into the accounting industry and have used their business skills to help them pursue a career in business management, marketing and finance.

Links to Future Careers

Entry Requirement GCSE Business Grade 6 and Grade 5 Maths and English

Entry Requirement Photography, Art & Design or Fine Art GCSE Grade 5

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Criminology Level 3 Criminology

English A-Level English Language

Subject Criminology

Subject English Language

Exam Board WJEC Specification Numbers

Exam Board WJEC Eduqas Specification Numbers A700U

601/6248/X

Teacher Responsible

Miss Rance

Teacher Responsible

Miss Mulrooney

Introduction There are four units in the course.

Introduction English Language is very different to the course studied at GCSE!

Two will be studied in Year 12 and two will be studied in Year 13.

This two year course involves: • Analysing spoken language - how do people talk? Why? What features differentiate spoken English from written English and why? • Exploring Language Issues: standard and non-standard English; language and power; language and situation; language and acquisition; language change over time; English in the 21st Century and its evolving nature due to technological and cultural change. • Creative and critical use of language – producing two pieces of original writing and commenting on their choice of language and its effect, pupils will construct a 2500- 3000 word investigation, closely exploring language and identity. Pupils will examine data they have collated focusing on a specific aspect of how speakers and or writers forge identities through their language use. Students will learn how to: • Develop and apply understanding of concepts and methods appropriate for the analysis and study of language; • Explore data and examples of language in use; • Engage creatively and critically with a varied range of texts and resources and explore links between texts; • Develop skills as producers and interpreters of language; • Independently investigate language in use in a variety of different contexts and scenarios.

Year 12 Content Unit One: Changing awareness of crime Unit Two: Criminological theories

Year 13 Content Unit Three: From the crime scene to the courtroom Unit Four: Crime and punishment

Aims of the Course

This course aims to provide the students with a strong foundation in the criminal process and those factors that might impact how a crime is reported and the outcome of a trial.

Aims of the Course

It deals with theories behind crime and criminality and the people and organisation who are involved in the legal process. While most lessons are classroom based, the course does encourage collaboration in some research tasks and will feature visits and talks by those involved in the criminal process.

How You Are Assessed

This course is broken down into four units, two of which will be studied in Year 12 and two in Year 13.

There are two units which are coursework based and two which are exam based. In Year 12, the students will submit their coursework and they will write an exam in June. This is the same for Year 13.

How You Are Assessed

Three exams will take place at the end of the two year course: two worth 30% of the overall A-Level grade and the other worth 20% of the overall grade.

Students will also complete a personal investigation, worth 20% of the overall grade exploring language and identity. English Language students are introduced to the concepts and disciplines of English Language/Linguistics in relation to a wide range of spoken and written forms, providing the opportunity to hone their skills of interrogating data, interpretation, analysis, evaluation, synthesis and reflection and their own creative writing. These skills are invaluable for a vast range of career paths such as: Journalism, Law Investigations in the Police/the Military focusing on language used to name a few...

The coursework unit is worth 50% of the final grade and the exam accounts for the remaining 50%.

Links to Future Careers

Grades are awarded from A*-E.

Links to Future Careers

National Probation service The courts and tribunal service The National Offender Management Service

Entry Requirement Grade 6 at GCSE English Language or English Literature (if a 6 or higher is achieved in English Literature but not Language, the minimum in Language must be a Grade 5)

Entry Requirement Grade 5 English

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English A-Level English Literature & Language

Film Studies A-Level Film Studies

Subject Film Studies Exam Board WJEC Eduqas Specification Numbers 603/0321/2

Subject English Literature and Language

Exam Board WJEC Eduqas Specification Numbers A710U

Teacher Responsible

Ms Parish

Teachers Responsible

Miss Martin / Miss Mulrooney

Introduction English Literature and Language builds upon the foundations of GCSE. This is a two year course.

Introduction The course is designed to introduce A-Level learners to a wide variety of films from different eras and countries in order to broaden their knowledge and understanding of film, the range of responses films can generate and how these responses are created.

The course allows pupils to travel back in time, share the experiences of others, take on new perspectives, explore ideas, beliefs and values, challenge or discover their own and learn the literary skills to express themselves in original and creative ways through dialogue, argument, prose and poetry. Students will learn how to: • Develop and apply understanding of concepts and methods appropriate for the analysis and study of language; • Use integrated linguistic and literary terminology in the reading and interpretation of texts; • Understand how language works in context focusing on how the texts were constructed and received; • Reflect on the connections between the various elements of their study, enabling them to explore how meaning is created;

Aims of the Course

Component 1: Varieties of film and film-making For this component, learners must study: two Hollywood films, one from the Classical Hollywood period (1930-1960) and the other from the New Hollywood period (1961- 1990) (comparative study), two American films produced since 2005, one mainstream film and one contemporary independent film (two-film study), and two British films (two- film study). Component 2: Global film-making perspectives For this component, learners must study: two non-English language films, one European and one from outside Europe (two-film study), one documentary film, one film option from a 1920s silent film movement, and one film option from an experimental film movement.

Aims of the Course

Component 3: Production (either a screenplay for a short film or a short film)

• Engage creatively and critically with a wide range of texts; • Develop skills as producers and interpreters of language; • Make accurate references to texts and sources.

How You Are Assessed

A-Level Film Studies is a 2 year linear qualification with 70% external assessment by examination and 30% non-exam assessment (NEA).

How You Are Assessed

Three exams will take place at the end of the two year course: two worth 30% of the overall A-Level grade and the other worth 20% of the overall grade.

This qualification consists of two components that are externally assessed (Components 1 and 2) and one component that is assessed by the centre and externally moderated (Component 3). Component 1: Varieties of film and film-making - written examination, 2 and a half hours (35% of qualification) Component 2: Global film-making perspectives - written examination, 2 and a half hours (35% of qualification) Component 3: Production – coursework (30% of qualification) Universities offer a wide range of film and media courses. The creative industries employment sector has increased by 19.5% since 2011 and now employs around 2 million people in the UK. One in six jobs in London is now within the creative economy and 2016 government figures show the sector growing at almost twice the rate of the wider UK economy, generating almost £9.6 million per hour.

Students will also complete a personal investigation, worth 20% of the overall grade. The non-exam assessment element is a folder containingTHREE pieces of work: a critical study and two pieces of creative writing (1 literary and 1 non-literary) with a total COMBINED word count of 3000-3500 words. This A-Level encourages students to be critical analysts of the world around them. Students will be able to appreciate the construction of language and meaning in a plethora of texts, including prose, poetry, drama and non-fiction. Students will become widely read in a range of different genres. This course provides students with the opportunity to complete independent study to University standards. Literature and Language are integrated on this course and thus students reap the benefits of gaining skills in investigative and theoretical discussion, suitable for a wealth of career paths. Entry Requirement Grade 6 at GCSE English Language or English Literature (if a 6 or higher is achieved in English Literature but not Language, the minimum in Language must be a Grade 5)

Links to Future Careers

Links to Future Careers

Entry Requirement Grade 5 in GCSE English

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Financial Studies Certificate in Finance

Geography A-Level Geography

Subject Geography

Subject Financial Studies Exam Board London Institute of Banking and Finance Specification Numbers CeFe/DipFs

Exam Board Edexcel Specification Numbers 9GEO

Teacher Responsible

Mr S Dunn

Teacher Responsible

Ms Ashbee

Introduction “Geography is the subject which holds the key to our future” – Michael Palin

A-Level Geography is a specification that will provide students with the knowledge, skills and enthusiasm sought by those in higher education and employers. It should excite students’ minds, challenge perceptions and stimulate their investigative and analytical skills. It is inherently multidisciplinary in a world that increasingly values people who have the skills needed to work across the physical and social sciences.

Introduction Finance is a broad subject that students will encounter throughout their lives and careers. Pupils will be expected to complete at least three hours independent learning each week to ensure they can keep up with the standard of this Finance course.

We recommend all prospective pupils start to familiarise themselves with developments in financial industry through wider reading.

Aims of the Course

The content of studies is as follows:

We have found those pupils who immerse themselves in financial literature often find it easier to apply financial theory to real examples which helps pupils to achieve highly.

Paper 1: Physical Geography Tectonic Processes and Hazards, Coastal Landscapes and Change, The Water Cycle and Water Insecurity and The Carbon Cycle and Energy Insecurity.

Aims of the Course

The Certificate in Financial Studies (CeFS) has been designed to provide students with a challenging qualification covering the core disciplines of financial capability. You will gain an appreciation of why money is important through focusing on what money is, attitudes to it and how it can affect life choices. You will be introduced to the financial services industry by focusing on the interaction between money, personal finance and the financial services marketplace. This course feeds into the Diploma in Financial Studies studied in Year 13.

Paper 2: Human Geography Globalisation, Regenerating Places, Superpowers and Migration, Identity and Sovereignty.

Paper 3: Synoptic Geography A synoptic investigation based on a geographical issue within a place-based context that links to one of the following themes: Players, attitudes and actions or futures and uncertainties.

Non-examination assessment Independent Fieldwork Investigation based on 4 days compulsory fieldwork.

How You Are Assessed

The Certificate in Financial Studies consists of two mandatory units:

Unit 1 – Financial capability for the immediate and short term Unit 2 – Financial capability for the medium and long term

How You Are Assessed

This qualification is linear, which means that students will sit all their exams and submit all their non-exam assessment at the end of the course.

Part A – 35 multiple choice questions – 1 mark per question Part B – Pre-release case study requiring essay responses to 5 questions

Paper 1: 30% of the qualification Paper 2: 30% of the qualification Paper 3: 20% of the qualification Non-examination assessment: 20% of the qualification

Links to Future Careers

The qualification provides a thorough grounding in money and financial management, a working knowledge of financial products/tools and an insight into the workings of the financial services industry in general. It can be a great benefit to those who wish to enter employment directly from school providing an excellent foundation from which a career in the financial services industry can be pursued.

Links to Future Careers

Geography is a facilitating subject; one which is most commonly required or preferred by Russell Group universities to get on to a range of degree courses. Many of the top universities will ask students to have at least one A-Level in a facilitating subject on application. Geography students are among the top 3 most employed graduates in a recent poll. This A-Level course should provide students with the knowledge, skills and enthusiasm sought by both higher education and employers. Future careers include consultancy, conservation, town planning, architecture and law.

Entry Requirement Grade 4 in GCSE English and GCSE Maths

Entry Requirement Grade 6 Geography, Grade 5 English and Maths

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History A-Level History

ICT Cambridge Technicals Introductory Diploma in IT

Subject History

Exam Board AQA Specification Numbers 7042

Subject Cambridge Technicals Introductory Diploma in IT Exam Board OCR Specification Numbers 601/7099/2

Teacher Responsible

Miss Watts

Introduction History is all around us. If you have an interest in the world around you, the society you live in, and how it has developed, if you like learning about people, how they interact and what motivates them, and about different countries, societies and cultures, then History is for you.

Teacher Responsible

Ms Akuffo-Kelly

Introduction This course will enable you to feel confident in applying for any Technology related course at University.

Students will study three components; A breadth study: The Tudors: England, 1485-1603 A depth study: Democracy and Nazism: 1918-1945

It will also give you a good grounding in the use and application of Technology in the world of work.

and a personal investigation covering the struggle for civil rights in America. This will involve the study of significant historical developments over a period of around 100 years and the associated historical interpretations. To develop key skills of research, analysis and communication of ideas and develop an understanding of significant historical events, the role of individuals in history and the nature of change over time. As well as this, students will gain a deeper understanding of the past via the study of a range of evidence and interpretations in order to appreciate the past from a political, social, economic or cultural perspective. Components one and two are written exams which are assessed at the end of the two year course. Both papers will have a compulsory question linked to historical interpretations/ evidence as well as a choice of two essay style questions.

Aims of the Course

The qualification aims to develop your knowledge, understanding and skills of the essentials of IT and Cyber Security.

Aims of the Course

You will gain an insight into the IT sector as you investigate the pace of technological change, IT infrastructure on a global scale, and the importance of legal and security considerations.

Designed in collaboration with industry experts, the qualification focuses on the requirements that today’s employers demand.

How You Are Assessed

The Technical Introductory Diploma involves 5 Units:

How You Are Assessed

Unit 1: Fundamentals of IT (Exam) Unit 2: Global Information (Exam)

Unit 6: Application Design (Coursework) Unit 9: Product Development (Coursework) Unit 13: Social Media and Digital Marketing (Coursework)

The third component will be a personal historical investigation.

Paper 1C: 40% of the qualification Paper 2O: 40% of the qualification Non-examination assessment: 20% of the qualification

Links to Future Careers

Application Developer IT Infrastructure Technician Data Analyst Emerging Digital Technical Practitioner

Links to Future Careers

History A-Level provides a sound basis for the study of history and other academic subjects at a higher level such as law & politics, or careers in architecture, the armed forces, journalism, medicine, advertising, law, the arts or the public sector such as the police and the Civil Service. History provides the ability to handle information, make judgements and express ideas clearly.

Entry Requirement Grade 4 in GCSE Computer Science or a Merit in Cambridge Nationals Creative iMedia Level 2

Entry Requirement Grade 6 in History and Grade 5 in English

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Law Level 3 BTEC Subsidiary in Applied Law

Mathematics AS and A-Level Mathematics

Subject Mathematics

Subject Applied Law

Exam Board Edexcel Specification Numbers 9MA0

Exam Board Edexcel Specification Numbers

500/7719/3

Teacher Responsible

Mr R Hillier

Teacher Responsible

Miss Rance

Introduction To further develop and extend the skills acquired in GCSE Mathematics in order to complement and support other A-Levels. The study of Mechanics helps prepare students for study in the fields of Education, Engineering and Science.

Introduction The course is a practical, work related course. You will acquire knowledge, understanding and the skills needed if you are interested in a career in law.

It is also useful as a BTEC qualification generally as it shows that you can study to A/S and A2 level. This course will provide students with an understanding of how the legal system in this country works, as well as providing them with the opportunity to research different aspects of our legal system.

Aims of the Course

The aims and objectives of this qualification are to enable students to: • understand mathematics and mathematical processes in a way that promotes confidence, fosters enjoyment and provides a strong foundation for progress to further study. • extend their range of mathematical skills and techniques. • understand coherence and progression in mathematics and how different areas of mathematics are connected. • applymathematics in other fields of study and be aware of the relevance of mathematics to the world of work and to situations in society in general. • use their mathematical knowledge to make logical and reasoned decisions in solving problems both within pure mathematics and in a variety of contexts, and communicate the mathematical rationale for these decisions clearly. • reason logically and recognise incorrect reasoning. • construct mathematical proofs. • use their mathematical skills and techniques to solve challenging problems that require them to decide on the solution strategy. • recognise when mathematics can be used to analyse and solve a problem in context. • represent situations mathematically and understand the relationship between problems in context and mathematical models that may be applied to solve them. • draw diagrams and sketch graphs to help explore mathematical situations and interpret solutions. • make deductions and inferences and draw conclusions by using mathematical reasoning. • interpret solutions and communicate their interpretation effectively in the context of the problem. • read and comprehend mathematical arguments, including justifications of methods and formulae, and communicate their understanding.

Aims of the Course

Students will need to be motivated and capable of working independently with minimal guidance.

How You Are Assessed

All units are assessed and graded internally. Coursework is produced for all units. An overall grade for the course is awarded as a combination of the grades.

The subject in the first year will consist of a 30 credit course and a further 30 credits will be taken in the second year.

Core Units for Year 12 which equal 30 credits: Unit 1: Dispute solving in the legal system Unit 2: Understanding Law making Unit 3: Aspects of legal liability

Units taken in Year 13, added to those in Year 12, will then equal 60 credits: • Unlawful homicide and Police Powers • Aspects of Employment Law • Aspects of Family Law

Links to Future Careers

Lawyer National Probation service The courts and tribunal service The National Offender Management Service

How You Are Assessed

At the end of the second year, you will sit three examinations, each worth 33.33% of your overall grade. Each examination is 2 hours long.

Links to Future Careers

A-Level Mathematics opens doors to further study and careers in Education, Banking, Economics, Accountancy, Actuary, Medicine and Computing.

Entry Requirement Grade 5 in English

Entry Requirement Grade 7 in Maths GCSE

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Music BTEC Level 3 Advanced Subsidiary Diploma in Music (Performance)

Performing Arts BTEC National Diploma in Performing Arts

Subject BTEC National Diploma in Performing Arts Exam Board Edexcel Specification Numbers 601/7232/0

Subject Music Exam Board Edexcel/Pearson Specification Numbers 500/7844/6

Teacher Responsible

Miss Cordell

Teacher Responsible

Mrs Woollett

Introduction The BTEC Diploma runs alongside the Extended Certificate, covering additional units and leading to a qualification equivalent to 2 A-Levels.

Introduction The course is largely practical and focuses on performance aspects of music. It is suitable for students with a passion for performing and an interest in developing skills and techniques on an instrument/voice as a soloist or group member. The course is ideal for any student wishing to pursue a vocation in performing professionally as a musician or in musical theatre, or for those who wish to pursue coaching and teaching performance. The course is a great way to balance an academic curriculum, and develops a range of skills suitable to support higher education in any subject. The programme covers a broad basis of study for the music sector with a focus on performance.

The Diploma is a practical, intense course for students who enjoy performing, directing, or writing drama. Students work as a theatre company on a wide range of performance projects and assignments, as well as learning about key theatre practitioners and playwrights to develop a range of specialist skills and knowledge in performance. The course is suitable both for students who want to go on to study drama, or those who are looking for a practical subject to balance more academic studies. There is no final written exam, however written coursework must be produced to a high standard and is demanding. There are many in-house and public performances and students must be prepared to perform in front of audiences, putting in rehearsal time and preparation both within class and in their own time. The 2-year course is continually assessed which means there are no final exams as such, however there are both practical and written tasks which are set and marked by the exam board throughout the year. 60% of the course is externally assessed via online submissions of written tasks and visiting examiners, with the remaining 40% marked by tutors and moderated by the exam board. Around 90% of classwork is practical, but this does mean that students are expected to complete written assignments in their own study time. Written work includes keeping a detailed rehearsal diary, research, preparation for presentations, and reading scripts. BTEC Level 3 qualifications are valued by employers and Higher Education (Universities and Colleges) and gain UCAS points in the same way as A-Levels. The vast majority of our students go on to university or drama school to study Performing Arts, Drama, Theatre Studies or a related subject. We also have an excellent track record with students gaining places at drama schools and dance colleges. The course equips students with confidence and excellent interpersonal skills to succeed in interviews and leads to a wide variety of careers, including work in the theatre, advertising, project management, PR, venue management, teaching, and journalism.

Aims of the Course

Aims of the Course

The course comprises of two core units, Music Performance Techniques, and either Solo Music Performance Skills or Working and Developing as a Music Ensemble. There are 4 further units and these can include Musical Theatre Performance, Pop Music in Practice, Singing Techniques and Performance, Music Project, or Music in the Community.

How You Are Assessed

Students will be expected to perform to the class and to an audience.

How You Are Assessed

All units in the BTEC PerformingArts qualifications are assessed internally by your tutor and other assessors. There is no final exam, but rehearsal and performance work is continually assessed, and so both written coursework and practical work must be produced to a consistently high standard throughout the course.

BTEC Subsidiary Diploma is largely equivalent to one GCE (A-Level).

Links to Future Careers

BTECs are widely recognised at Universities and Colleges and gain UCAS points in the same way as A-Levels. This qualification is equivalent to one A-Level qualification. The course would enable students to pursue higher education courses in Musical Performance, Musical Theatre, and other performance related courses. In the workplace, the qualification could lead to peripatetic teaching opportunities, or a career in performance or music therapy. The course would also offer foundations of understanding in administrative jobs within the music industry, and also prove useful in a music recording studio.

Links to Future Careers

Entry Requirement Grade 4 in Drama or a related subject, or a Merit in a Level 2 BTEC in Performing Arts

Entry Requirement Grade 4 in one musical instrument or Merit BTEC Music or Grade 4 GCSE Music

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