CR_G1-G4_Print_Protoype_051717

REALISTIC FICTION

MAKE A PREDICTION  Preview Around the Campfire. A boy’s flashlight doesn’t work on a camping trip. What do you think will happen? GENRE Realistic fiction stories are made up but could happen in real life.

SET A PURPOSE  Read to find out how a family solves a problem on a camping trip.

2

Around the Campfire

READ  What is the story’s problem? Underline it.

It is dark when you camp in the woods. That is why you need flashlights. Mine did not work last night, so my parents made a warm fire. We grilled our food on the fire. We sang funny songs and told silly around the fire. 

Close Reading Tip Put a ? by the parts you have questions about.

CHECK MY UNDERSTANDING

The family solves the problem by

3

READ  What is the new problem? Underline it.

When it got late, it was time for bed. Dad put out the fire. Then it was really dark . . . and hard to see! But when my eyes got used to the dark, I saw lots of stars in the sky. The moon was so bright! It even made shadows on the ground. I could see our tent in the light. I love camping, even without a flashlight! 

Close Reading Tip Put C by words or sentences when you make a connection.

CHECK MY UNDERSTANDING The boy’s flashlight doesn’t work, but he still loves camping. Why?

4

CITE TEXT EVIDENCE

WRITE ABOUT IT What happens the next night on the camping trip? Add to the story. Write about the events in order. Draw a picture on another sheet of paper.

5

REALISTIC FICTION

MAKE A PREDICTION  Preview Around the Campfire. A boy’s flashlight doesn’t work on a camping trip. What do you think will happen? GENRE Realistic fiction stories are made up but could happen in real life.

SET A PURPOSE  Read to find out how a family solves a problem on a camping trip.

21

Around the Campfire

READ  What is the story’s problem? Underline it.

It is dark when you camp in the woods. That is why you need flashlights. Mine did not work last night, so my parents made a warm fire. We grilled our food on the fire. We sang funny songs and told silly around the fire. 

Close Reading Tip Put a ? by the parts you have questions about.

CHECK MY UNDERSTANDING

The family solves the problem by

22

REALISTIC FICTION

MAKE A PREDICTION Preview Around the Campfire. A boy’s flashlight doesn’t work on a camping trip. What do you think will happen? GENRE Realistic fiction stories are made up but could happen in real life.

Around the Campfire

READ What is the story’s problem? Underline it.

It is dark when you camp in the woods. That is why you need flashlights. Mine did not work last night, so my parents made a warm fire. We grilled our food on the fire. We sang funny songs and told silly around the fire.

Close Reading Tip Put a ? by the parts you have questions about.

CHECK MY UNDERSTANDING

The family solves the problem by

SET A PURPOSE Read to find out how a family solves a problem on a camping trip.

2

3

READ What is the new problem? Underline it.

CITE TEXT EVIDENCE

When it got late, it was time for bed. Dad put out the fire. Then it was really dark . . . and hard to see! But when my eyes got used to the dark, I saw lots of stars in the sky. The moon was so bright! It even made shadows on the ground. I could see our tent in the light. I love camping, even without a flashlight!

WRITE ABOUT IT What happens the next night on the camping trip? Add to the story. Write about the events in order. Draw a picture on another sheet of paper.

Close Reading Tip Put C by words or sentences when you make a connection.

CHECK MY UNDERSTANDING The boy’s flashlight doesn’t work, but he still loves camping. Why?

4

5

INFORMATIONAL TEXT

GENRE STUDY You know that informational text gives facts and examples about a topic. As you read The Skin You’re In, look for clues that this is an informational text. • Informational texts often include visuals such as charts, diagrams, graphs, and photographs. • Informational texts may include sidebars that tell interesting facts. • Science texts include words that are specific to the topic. SET A PURPOSE Think about the title and genre of this text. What do you already know about skin? What do you want to learn? Start filling in this KWL chart.

K What I Know

W What I Want to Know

L What I Learned

CONTEXT CLUES As you read, look at the words in boldface type. Circle words and phrases that give clues to the meaning of each boldfaced word.

10

READ paragraphs 5–6. How does your skin protect you? Underline the phrases that tell you.

Certain parts of the body have more nerve endings than other parts. Your fingertips, face (especially the lips), and toes have the most nerve endings. That’s why you are more likely to feel heat more quickly and intensely if you pick up a hot object with your fingers than if you bump into it with your arm or your leg. The least sensitive part on your body is the middle of your back. Your skin is like your suit of armor. It protects you from harm and lets you know, through your sense of touch, if something is safe to touch.

CLOSE READING Read paragraph 4. Look for linking words that signal text structure. Circle the linking words. What

5

Finish Your KWL Chart What did you learn about your skin? What did you learn about informational texts? In the What I Learned column, write at least two things you learned. Then, think about what else you want to learn about this topic. Write it in the chart.

text structure did the author use for this paragraph?

Think-Pair-Share If your teacher asks you to work in pairs, follow these steps:

6

• Think about what you learned by reading The Skin You’re In. Look at what you wrote in the What I Learned column of your KWL Chart. • Share your chart with your partner. Tell each other what you learned. • Talk about what else would you like to know. How can you find out?

Touchy Fact

Write About It

Have you ever bitten your tongue and wondered why it hurt so much? It’s because the sides of your tongue have a lot of nerve endings that are very sensitive to pain. However, your tongue is not as good at

CITE TEXT EVIDENCE How do the parts of an informational text help you to learn more about a topic? Explain your answer using at least two examples from The Skin You’re In.

sensing hot or cold. That is why it’s so easy to burn your mouth when you eat something really hot.

CHECK YOUR COMPREHENSION

Write a sentence to summarize the information in paragraph 5.

8

9

REALISTIC FICTION

MAKE A PREDICTION Preview Around the Campfire. A boy’s flashlight doesn’t work on a camping trip. What do you think will happen? GENRE Realistic fiction stories are made up but could happen in real life.

Around the Campfire

READ What is the story’s problem? Underline it.

It is dark when you camp in the woods. That is why you need flashlights. Mine did not work last night, so my parents made a warm fire. We grilled our food on the fire. We sang funny songs and told silly around the fire.

Close Reading Tip Put a ? by the parts you have questions about.

CHECK MY UNDERSTANDING

SET A PURPOSE Read to find out how a family solves a problem on a camping trip.

The family solves the problem by

21

22

READ What is the new problem? Underline it.

CITE TEXT EVIDENCE

When it got late, it was time for bed. Dad put out the fire. Then it was really dark . . . and hard to see! But when my eyes got used to the dark, I saw lots of stars in the sky. The moon was so bright! It even made shadows on the ground. I could see our tent in the light. I love camping, even without a flashlight!

WRITE ABOUT IT What happens the next night on the camping trip? Add to the story. Write about the events in order. Draw a picture on another sheet of paper.

Close Reading Tip Put C by words or sentences when you make a connection.

CHECK MY UNDERSTANDING The boy’s flashlight doesn’t work, but he still loves camping. Why?

4

5

INFORMATIONAL TEXT

GENRE STUDY You know that informational text gives facts and examples about a topic. As you read The Skin You’re In, look for clues that this is an informational text. • Informational texts often include visuals such as charts, diagrams, graphs, and photographs. • Informational texts may include sidebars that tell interesting facts. • Science texts include words that are specific to the topic. SET A PURPOSE Think about the title and genre of this text. What do you already know about skin? What do you want to learn? Start filling in this KWL chart.

K What I Know

W What I Want to Know

L What I Learned

CONTEXT CLUES As you read, look at the words in boldface type. Circle words and phrases that give clues to the meaning of each boldfaced word.

10

READ paragraphs 5–6. How does your skin protect you? Underline the phrases that tell you.

Certain parts of the body have more nerve endings than other parts. Your fingertips, face (especially the lips), and toes have the most nerve endings. That’s why you are more likely to feel heat more quickly and intensely if you pick up a hot object with your fingers than if you bump into it with your arm or your leg. The least sensitive part on your body is the middle of your back. Your skin is like your suit of armor. It protects you from harm and lets you know, through your sense of touch, if something is safe to touch.

CLOSE READING Read paragraph 4. Look for linking words that signal text structure. Circle the linking words. What

5

Finish Your KWL Chart What did you learn about your skin? What did you learn about informational texts? In the What I Learned column, write at least two things you learned. Then, think about what else you want to learn about this topic. Write it in the chart.

text structure did the author use for this paragraph?

Think-Pair-Share If your teacher asks you to work in pairs, follow these steps:

6

• Think about what you learned by reading The Skin You’re In. Look at what you wrote in the What I Learned column of your KWL Chart. • Share your chart with your partner. Tell each other what you learned. • Talk about what else would you like to know. How can you find out?

Touchy Fact

Write About It

Have you ever bitten your tongue and wondered why it hurt so much? It’s because the sides of your tongue have a lot of nerve endings that are very sensitive to pain. However, your tongue is not as good at

CITE TEXT EVIDENCE How do the parts of an informational text help you to learn more about a topic? Explain your answer using at least two examples from The Skin You’re In.

sensing hot or cold. That is why it’s so easy to burn your mouth when you eat something really hot.

CHECK YOUR COMPREHENSION

Write a sentence to summarize the information in paragraph 5.

8

9

Around the Campfire

The Parade

The Night I Cooked Chicken For My Mom

INFORMATIONAL TEXT

GENRE STUDY  You know that informational text gives facts and examples about a topic. As you read The Skin You’re In, look for clues that this is an informational text. • Informational texts often include visuals such as charts, diagrams, graphs, and photographs. • Informational texts may include sidebars that tell interesting facts. • Science texts include words that are specific to the topic. SET A PURPOSE  Think about the title and genre of this text. What do you already know about skin? What do you want to learn? Start filling in this KWL chart.

K What I Know

W What I Want to Know

L What I Learned

CONTEXT CLUES  As you read, look at the words in boldface type. Circle words and phrases that give clues to the meaning of each boldfaced word.

4

The Skin You’re In

READ paragraphs 1–3.  What does your skin do? Underline the phrases that tell you.

Your Sense of Touch Unlike other senses, your sense of touch isn’t limited to one part of the body. That’s because your skin is what first comes in contact with the objects you touch. Your skin protects your bones and organs from water, sunlight, and germs. It also prevents blood and other fluids inside your body from leaking out.

1

Touchy Fact

There are about 100 nerve endings for touch in each of your fingertips! People who are blind use their fingertips to read by using a writing system called Braille.

5

Your skin is made up of two main layers. The epidermis is the top layer of skin. The dermis lies underneath it. Your sense of touch originates, or starts, in the dermis. The dermis has millions of tiny nerve endings that send information to your brain about the objects that come in contact with your body.

CLOSE READING  Informational texts include words that are specific to the topic. Reread paragraph 2.

2

Look for words about the topic. List them below.

3

hair

epidermis

dermis

fatty tissue

CHECK YOUR COMPREHENSION

Select True or False for each statement below.

Your sense of touch is limited to your hands.

 True  

 False

Your skin protects your organs.

 True  

 False

6

READ paragraph 4. What do nerve endings do? Underline the evidence in the text.

How Does That Feel? These nerve endings in the dermis tell your brain if an object is hot, cold, rough, smooth, soft, hard, or even sticky. There are four main kinds of information send to the brain: heat, cold, pain, and pressure.

CLOSE READING  How does the diagram help you understand the text?

4

What information does the diagram provide that the text does not include?

heat and cold

pain

deep pressure

CHECK YOUR COMPREHENSION

Use information in the text and the diagram to explain the difference between epidermis and dermis.

7

READ paragraphs 5–6. How does your skin protect you? Underline the phrases that tell you.

Certain parts of the body have more nerve endings than other parts. Your fingertips, face (especially the lips), and toes have the most nerve endings. That’s why you are more likely to feel heat more quickly and intensely if you pick up a hot object with your fingers than if you bump into it with your arm or your leg. The least sensitive part on your body is the middle of your back. Your skin is like your suit of armor. It protects you from harm and lets you know, through your sense of touch, if something is safe to touch.

CLOSE READING  Read paragraph 4. Look for linking words that signal text structure. Circle the linking words. What

5

text structure did the author use for this paragraph?

6

Touchy Fact

Have you ever bitten your tongue and wondered why it hurt so much? It’s because the sides of your tongue have a lot of nerve endings that are very sensitive to pain. However, your tongue is not as good at

sensing hot or cold. That is why it’s so easy to burn your mouth when you eat something really hot.

CHECK YOUR COMPREHENSION

Write a sentence to summarize the information in paragraph 5.

8

Finish Your KWL Chart What did you learn about your skin? What did you learn about informational texts? In the What I Learned column, write at least two things you learned. Then, think about what else you want to learn about this topic. Write it in the chart.

Think-Pair-Share If your teacher asks you to work in pairs, follow these steps:

• Think about what you learned by reading The Skin You’re In. Look at what you wrote in the What I Learned column of your KWL Chart. • Share your chart with your partner. Tell each other what you learned. • Talk about what else would you like to know. How can you find out?

Write About It

CITE TEXT EVIDENCE  How do the parts of an informational text help you to learn more about a topic? Explain your answer using at least two examples from The Skin You’re In.

9

READ paragraphs 5–6. How does your skin protect you? Underline the phrases that tell you.

Certain parts of the body have more nerve endings than other parts. Your fingertips, face (especially the lips), and toes have the most nerve endings. That’s why you are more likely to feel heat more quickly and intensely if you pick up a hot object with your fingers than if you bump into it with your arm or your leg. The least sensitive part on your body is the middle of your back. Your skin is like your suit of armor. It protects you from harm and lets you know, through your sense of touch, if something is safe to touch.

CLOSE READING  Read paragraph 4. Look for linking words that signal text structure. Circle the linking words. What

5

text structure did the author use for this paragraph?

6

Touchy Fact

Have you ever bitten your tongue and wondered why it hurt so much? It’s because the sides of your tongue have a lot of nerve endings that are very sensitive to pain. However, your tongue is not as good at

sensing hot or cold. That is why it’s so easy to burn your mouth when you eat something really hot.

CHECK YOUR COMPREHENSION

Write a sentence to summarize the information in paragraph 5.

24

Put It Together

Finish Your KWL Chart What did you learn about your skin? What did you learn about informational texts? In the What I Learned column, write at least two things you learned. Then, think about what else you want to learn about this topic. Write it in the chart.

Think-Pair-Share If your teacher asks you to work in pairs, follow these steps:

• Think about what you learned by reading The Skin You’re In. Look at what you wrote in the What I Learned column of your KWL Chart. • Share your chart with your partner. Tell each other what you learned. • Talk about what else would you like to know. How can you find out?

Write About It

CITE TEXT EVIDENCE  How do the parts of an informational text help you to learn more about a topic? Explain your answer using at least two examples from The Skin You’re In.

25

INFORMATIONAL TEXT

GENRE STUDY  You know that informational text gives facts and examples about a topic. As you read The Skin You’re In, look for clues that this is an informational text. • Informational texts often include visuals such as charts, diagrams, graphs, and photographs. • Informational texts may include sidebars that tell interesting facts. • Science texts include words that are specific to the topic. SET A PURPOSE  Think about the title and genre of this text. What do you already know about skin? What do you want to learn? Start filling in this KWL chart.

K What I Know

W What I Want to Know

L What I Learned

CONTEXT CLUES  As you read, look at the words in boldface type. Circle words and phrases that give clues to the meaning of each boldfaced word.

10

MUNCH!

sour

salty

sweet

salty

READ paragraphs 1–3.  What does your skin do? Underline the phrases that tell you. How Do We Taste?  by Meg Moss

No, do not bite your little sister to find out. Instead, think about sweet hot fudge . . . salty, crunchy chips . . . sour, puckery lemons . . . a juicy, meaty hamburger . . . and (yech) bitter brewed tea. From these five basic tastes—sweet, salty, sour, savory, bitter—come all the flavors that we humans know and love (or hate). But how do we taste them?

1

CLOSE READING  What does your skin do? Underline the phrases that tell you.

11

INFORMATIONAL TEXT

GENRE STUDY  You know that informational text gives facts and examples about a topic. As you read The Skin You’re In, look for clues that this is an informational text. • Informational texts often include visuals such as charts, diagrams, graphs, and photographs. • Informational texts may include sidebars that tell interesting facts. • Science texts include words that are specific to the topic. SET A PURPOSE  Think about the title and genre of this text. What do you already know about skin? What do you want to learn? Start filling in this KWL chart.

K What I Know

W What I Want to Know

L What I Learned

CONTEXT CLUES  As you read, look at the words in boldface type. Circle words and phrases that give clues to the meaning of each boldfaced word.

20

How come she thinks is spicy and i don’t?

1

This tastes to spicy!

How Do We Taste?

I am not tasting anything?

21

GRADE 4 OPENER ART SIZE OPTIONS

INFORMATIONAL TEXT

GENRE STUDY  You know that informational text gives facts and examples about a topic. As you read TheSkinYou’re In, look for clues that this is an informational text. • Informational texts often include visuals such as charts, diagrams, graphs, and photographs. • Informational texts may include sidebars that tell interesting facts. • Science texts include words that are specific to the topic. SET A PURPOSE  Think about the title and genre of this text. What do you already know about skin? What do you want to learn? Start filling in this KWL chart.

The Skin You’re In

READ paragraphs 1–3.  What does your skin do? Underline the phrases that tell you.

Your Sense of Touch Unlike other senses, your sense of touch isn’t limited to one part of the body. That’s because your skin is what first comes in contact with the objects you touch. Your skin protects your bones and organs from water, sunlight, and germs. It also prevents blood and other fluids inside your body from leaking out.

K What IKnow

W What IWant toKnow

L What ILearned

1

Touchy Fact

There are about 100 nerve endings for touch in each of your fingertips! People who are blind use their fingertips to read by using a writing system called Braille.

CONTEXT CLUES  As you read, look at the words in boldface type. Circle words and phrases that give clues to the meaning of each boldfaced word.

INFORMATIONAL TEXT

MUNCH!

GENRE STUDY  You know that informational text gives facts and examples about a topic. As you read TheSkinYou’re In, look for clues that this is an informational text. • Informational texts often include visuals such as charts, diagrams, graphs, and photographs. • Informational texts may include sidebars that tell interesting facts. • Science texts include words that are specific to the topic. SET A PURPOSE  Think about the title and genre of this text. What do you already know about skin? What do you want to learn? Start filling in this KWL chart.

sour

salty

sweet

salty

K What IKnow

W What IWant toKnow

L What ILearned

How Do We Taste?  by Meg Moss

READ paragraphs 1–3.  What does your skin do? Underline the phrases that tell you.

No, do not bite your little sister to find out. Instead, think about sweet hot fudge . . . salty, crunchy chips . . . sour, puckery lemons . . . a juicy, meaty hamburger . . . and (yech) bitter brewed tea. From these five basic tastes—sweet, salty, sour, savory, bitter—come all the flavors that we humans know and love (or hate). But how do we taste them?

1

CONTEXT CLUES  As you read, look at the words in boldface type. Circle words and phrases that give clues to the meaning of each boldfaced word.

CLOSE READING  What does your skin do? Underline the phrases that tell you.

INFORMATIONAL TEXT

GENRE STUDY  You know that informational text gives facts and examples about a topic. As you read TheSkinYou’re In, look for clues that this is an informational text. • Informational texts often include visuals such as charts, diagrams, graphs, and photographs. • Informational texts may include sidebars that tell interesting facts. • Science texts include words that are specific to the topic. SET A PURPOSE  Think about the title and genre of this text. What do you already know about skin? What do you want to learn? Start filling in this KWL chart.

How come she thinks is spicy and i don’t?

K What IKnow

W What IWant toKnow

L What ILearned

1

This tastes to spicy!

How Do We Taste?

I am not tasting anything?

CONTEXT CLUES  As you read, look at the words in boldface type. Circle words and phrases that give clues to the meaning of each boldfaced word.

Larger option can be an opportunity for teaching or introduce something about the text.

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