Spada Law Group - August 2019

THE SLG ADVISOR

617.889.5000 | SPADALAWGROUP.COM

AUGUST 2019

Howto Ruin a Saturday Hike

The Trouble With Being Too Competitive

W e’ve all heard the term “competitive edge.” From a very early age, I’ve been told that I am a very competitive person. But what is the competitive edge? Is it a good thing? As a child, I always tried hard at both sports and school. I really enjoyed activities where the goal was to compete against others at something, whether it be a sport, a board game, a bike race, or, as you’ll read later, a friendly hike. It was just in my DNA to try to win. I hate losing, which happened in sports more frequently than I would like to admit. Even now, I realize that I’ve always been attracted to others who shared my love of competition. My wife of 25 years is even more competitive than I am. Not surprisingly, we have two super competitive kids. While many people view that “competitive edge” as valuable, I’ve begun to question whether being super competitive is actually a good thing. Having standards and wanting to be the best version of yourself is ultimately a good trait, one that can lead you to personal and professional fulfillment. However, I realize that being too competitive in the wrong situation can be detrimental to you and others. For example, being too competitive in a personal or business relationship can sour the relationship, especially if the other person does not view the situation appropriate for a competition.

a very difficult trail to the peak of Mount Osceola in New Hampshire, I found myself wanting to be the first one up the trail. This was a group of people who got together to enjoy a Saturday hike in the beautiful White Mountains, and there I was, turning this peaceful activity into a competition. On some level, I was upset with myself for acting this way. Why did I feel the need to compete with the others in an activity that was in no way a competition? Yes, I did make it to the peak first. And yes, I got some weird pleasure out of that fact. But I consider that level of competitiveness to be detrimental, and I wish I could temper it and only apply it in appropriate circumstances. There are many ways in which my competitive nature has been beneficial in my life. I loved being in the courtroom as an Assistant District Attorney in Boston. I was able to exercise my competitive nature in a one-on- one adversarial proceeding against another lawyer in court, trying to persuade jurors that a defendant was guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. I can honestly say that was more exhilarating than any athletic event I had ever participated in, and I loved it. For the last 20 years, I have been able to remain competitive professionally as a personal injury attorney, helping injured victims stand up to the bureaucracy and stinginess of large insurance companies. In doing so, I go up against very skilled lawyers hired by the insurance companies and advocate on behalf of the underdog: the victim. I recognize this level of competition

is what keeps me engaged in my work and motivated to be my best.

Bringing my competitiveness to my work is a good thing for myself and my clients. However, bringing that same competitive edge to friendly hikes leaves me looking like a fool. Some people are competitive inwardly, meaning they do not feel the need to compete against others but try to be the best version of themselves. I believe this version of competitiveness is the better version, and it is the version I wish I had more of. That said, I am a work in progress on that aspect of my life, and I don’t suspect I will be getting significantly better anytime soon, especially living in my ultra-competitive household. -Len Spada

Recently, I was on a hike with an over-50 hiking group. As we worked our way up

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Storing Your Summer Gear

P reparing for N ext Y ear Although winter seems like a distant prospect, it will be here before you know it. While many people are sad to see their summer clothes and gadgets get stored away until next season, it’s a good idea to start planning now. Taking the time to properly pack away summer gear is beneficial and can save you from unneeded worry next year.

Why It’s Important to Store Summer Gear

Properly organizing and storing your summer clothes will help them last longer and prevent you from aimlessly rummaging when searching for that perfect fall sweater or blouse. Likewise, when you cover your patio furniture and tuck your bicycle and tools away, they are less likely to be damaged by animals or any harsh winter weather.

good idea to place cedar sachets in with your clothes and around the neck of your hangers; the wood will keep away pesky insects without leaving bad smells behind.

Storing Summer Attire

Storing Your Summer Gadgets

Consider purchasing plastic storage tubs or boxes to put your clothes in. If you’re storing dresses, skirts, or any fancy clothing, plastic or nylon garment bags will help prevent them from getting dirty and wrinkly. Before you start piling your clothes in, be sure to wash and completely dry them. This helps prevent mold or mildew and keeps your clothes looking new when it’s time to take them out again. Also, it can be a

Outdoor items are more likely to get damaged as they endure the elements. When you’re storing rakes, shovels, or any other garden tools, make sure they’re washed, dried, and sharpened before putting them into your shed or garage. Patios should be cleaned off and given a fresh coat of wax, and outdoor furniture should be dusted, cleaned, and covered to keep the frost, snow, and rain off.

Review of the Month The Business of Making Lives Better

Attorneys should never spend time sitting on their laurels. For every successful case we close, there is another client relying on us to work just as fast and just as hard for them. Spada Law Group is in the business of making lives better month after month, so our clients can go on to share their success stories, like this one. “Honestly, one of the best groups of people I have ever met. Not only did they take care of everything from the moment I called in, but they also connected with my family and me on a personal level. They treated us with the warmth of family and handled all the processes with integrity and efficiency. Truly one of the best experiences I have ever had in my life. I would recommend Spada Law Group to anyone, and I will be more than happy to send many others their way. I certainly will pass by just to visit; that is how remarkable they are. Blessings upon them! –Jesse L.

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Word Search August Word Search

After an Accident, Knowledge Is Power After a car accident, people are faced with questions they never thought they would have to ask themselves. Who will pay my medical bills? What if the other driver doesn’t have enough (or any) insurance? What happens if I am partially at fault? How can I afford a lawyer? It’s easy to feel overwhelmed when faced with so much uncertainty, but you aren’t powerless. Learning the answers to these and other pressing questions is your first step toward recovering your health and defending your legal rights. That’s why we’re proud to announce Len Spada’s new book, “What You Need to Know About Your Massachusetts Car Accident Case Before You Make Any Legal Decisions.” This comprehensive guide draws on Len’s many years of experience defending the rights of injured drivers to address the most pressing questions you may have. Inside you’ll find out when you should seek medical treatment, the kinds of compensation you may be eligible for, and what you should look for in a lawyer to represent your case. We expect Len’s book to be released within the next month, and it is a must-read for those who have recently been involved in a car accident. As a personal injury firm, we know how hard it can be to seek out a lawyer during this disorientating period. It is our sincere hope that this guide will empower you to make informed decisions about your health and legal decisions in the wake of an accident. You deserve to know your options after such a life-altering event. So, if you are injured, we sincerely wish you a fast and full recovery. We hope this guide provides comfort in the form of knowledge and puts you in the best possible position to make good legal decisions going forward. To be one of the first to receive Len’s new book, simply call our office at 617.889.5000 and we will get one in the mail to you FREE of charge. Len’s New Book Is Coming Soon!

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Summertime Gazpacho Local Chef’s Corner Inspired by CookieAndKate.com

Gazpacho, an Andalusian soup made of blended vegetables and traditionally served cold, is the perfect refresher on a warm summer day.

INGREDIENTS • 2 1/2 lbs ripe tomatoes; cored, seeded, and cut into 1-inch chunks • 1 small cucumber; peeled, seeded, and cut into 1-inch chunks • 1 red bell pepper; cored, seeded, and sliced into ribbons

• 1 small Vidalia onion, peeled and cubed • 1/4 cup basil leaves • 1 clove garlic, peeled • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil • 2 tbsp sherry vinegar • Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

DIRECTIONS 1. Place a blender and medium mixing bowl on your workstation. 2. Divide the tomato chunks, cucumber pieces, and bell pepper slices evenly between blender and bowl. Place entire onion in blender. 3. Add basil, garlic, olive oil, vinegar, salt, and pepper to blender. Blend on low, gradually raising speed to high until smooth, about 2 minutes. 4. Add blender contents to bowl and mix until just broken up, about 10–20 seconds. 5. Let mixture sit in fridge for a minimum of 2 hours. Transfer to bowls and serve.

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111 Everett Ave #1F Chelsea, MA 02150 617.889.5000 SpadaLawGroup.com

Inside This Issue

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What Is the Competitive Edge? Preparing Your Gear for Winter Review of the Month Summertime Gazpacho Injured by a Driver? You Need This Book How These Rats Save Lives

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Heroism From an Unexpected Source

MEET THE RATS THAT SNIFF OUT LAND MINES

mines. While they are bigger than your average pet rat — some can be as large as a cat — they’re still light enough that they won’t detonate a land mine if they stand on one. Though they have poor eyesight, they make up for that deficiency with an incredible sense of smell. A fully trained rat can sniff amounts of TNT as small as 29 grams and distinguish it from other industrial substances like motor oil and battery acid.

When you think of animals that could be considered heroic, giant rats probably aren’t the first creatures that pop into your head. Many people still think of them as filthy, disease-ridden little thieves that deserve eradication rather than a medal. But one nongovernmental organization (NGO) has proven just how heroic rats can be by training them to detect land mines and, in turn, save lives. Over 60 countries worldwide still feel the effects of wars past every time someone steps on an unactivated land mine. Dogs and metal detectors have traditionally

Along with these innate qualities, pouched rats are easy and cheap to train. While a dog can only bond with and

work for one master, rats will sniff out land mines under any person’s direction, so long as they get a tasty treat afterward. They can search a 2,000 square foot area in 20 minutes, saving humans from days of dangerous, meticulous work.

been used to find and safely detonate land mines in these countries, but both methods are costly and time-consuming. A human with a metal detector could take up to four days to clear a 2,000 square foot area of any land mines, and people knew there had to be a faster, safer way. Tanzania-based NGO APOPO found the answer: African giant pouched rats. These rats have several advantages over dogs and humans when it comes to detecting land

Between 1995 and 2015, APOPO’s rats found about 13,200 mines in Africa and Southeast Asia. Today, their programs are still going strong, proving that heroism can be found in even the most unlikely of animals.

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