CellCheck_Newsletter_August 2016_006

CELLCHECK NEWS CELLCHECK NEWS P2

PAGE 2

GUEST CONTRIBUTOR P3

CELLCHECK TIP OF THE MONTH CELLCHECK TIP OF THE MONTH P7

PAGE 6

NEWSLETTER CellCheck AHI gratefully acknowledges the financial and other contributions of FBD, Teagasc, UCD and our other stakeholders to the CellCheck prog amme. AUGUST EDITION 2016 CellCheck Newsletter JANUARY EDITION 2015 SERVICE PROVIDER NOTES PAGE 8 AHI gratefully acknowledges the financial and other contributions of FBD, Teagasc, UCD and our other stakeholders to the CellCheck programme.

Animal Health Ireland, Main Street, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co Leitrim. Tel: +353 (0) 71 9671928, Email: admin@animalhealthireland.ie www.animalhealthireland.ie 4-5 The Archw ys, Carrick-o -Shannon, Co Leitrim N41 WN27.

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER AUGUST EDITION 2016

NEWS

FINOLA McCOY, PROGRAMME MANAGER

WELCOME to this month’s edition of the CellCheck newsletter. This month’s top tip is a reminder to change liners after 2,000 milkings or 6 months (whichever comes first!), while our guest contributor this month, Tom Ryan from Teagasc, explains how good housing design can reduce the risk of mastitis in herds. He has some great advice and reminders about the things we need to consider to make sure cows are clean, dry and comfortable when indoors. In other news, the DAFM registration phase for KT participants is now closed, and group facilitators are currently scheduling provisional dates for the CellCheck Farmer Workshops for their KT discussion groups over the next 18 months, via the AHI online system. We also welcome Sinead Treanor of Carbery back to the team of CellCheck Regional Coordinators!

PAGE 2

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER AUGUST EDITION 2016

GUEST CONTRIBUTOR

MASTITIS in cows is almost always caused by bacteria which have gained access to the udder through the teat canal. These bacteria may have spread from other cows (contagious) or may be picked up in the cow’s environment i.e. from manure, soil, bedding, calving areas, etc. Bacteria such as E. coli and Strep. uberis , which survive in the cow’s environment, can cause severe cases of mastitis. Anything that will reduce the numbers of bacteria in the cow’s environment or minimise exposure of teats to these bacteria will reduce the mastitis risk. Good housing design helps to reduce the level of clinical and subclinical mastitis making it easier to produce quality milk. It does this by creating conditions that minimise teat end exposure to manure and bacteria. Housing design to minimise mastitis Tom Ryan, Farm Building Specialist, Teagasc, Kildalton, Co. Kilkenny

Cubicles Cows need room to exhibit natural body movement when lying down and getting up; much the same as they would do in the field. A cow can spend 12 to 14 hours a day lying down if cubicles are comfortable. Cows positioned comfortably will be able to rest and can easily regurgitate and chew the cud. 70 to 80% of this rumination takes place while cows are lying down. The length and width of cubicles depends on the size of cows. The general

PAGE 3

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER AUGUST EDITION 2016

recommendation for length is 2.6m facing a wall and 2.4m each for double rows head to head (longer for big cows). The width should be about 1.18m (wider for big cows). Good length allows cows to lunge forward when lying down and getting up. Sufficient width will ensure she can lie straight and get up and lie down without obstruction. To increase lunging space in your current cubicles, you may need to remove walls between double rows or any other obstruction at the front of the cubicles e.g. a low rail. If old cubicle divisions need to be replaced, take the opportunity, if possible, to correct any faults with the design. Cows will tolerate cubicles with design flaws, however lying times will be reduced and cows will be stressed. Cows under stress will dung more on their beds, especially when getting up. Freshly calved cows excrete large numbers of E. coli in the faeces. Dirty cubicle beds coupled with leaked milk produce a very severe mastitis risk.

Neckrails and brisket boards

Incorrect positioning of the neckrail is a common problem. The purpose of the neck rail is to position the cow properly in the cubicle and prevent her from standing too far forward and dunging on the back of the bed. The neck rail is too far back in many sheds and cows are unable to stand fully in the cubicle. They end up standing with the back feet in the passageway. The feet are standing on concrete rather than on a

soft cubicle mat. The feet are also getting dirtier which in turn leads to a dirtier udder and teats. Just moving the neck rail forward slightly can solve the problem. Reposition the neckrail on a few bays first to find the best position. Observe how the cows are responding before finally adjusting all the neck rails. Another problem is that the height of the neckrail is usually too low. The rail is just at a height where the cow’s head should be. A low neckrail may cause cows to stand diagonally in the cubicle and as a result lie diagonally which leads to more soiling of the bed. Moving it forward will help somewhat. It is generally accepted that the neckrail should be about 1.25m above the bed. Observe cows as they stand in the cubicle to assess the problem. A brisket board is essential as it helps the cow to lie down in the right place; not too far forward or too far back, allowing her room to lunge forward and get up without hitting the neckrail. A low (about 10cm) and rounded brisket board is ideal. Again, position the brisket board in a few bays initially to decide on the best location.

PAGE 4

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER AUGUST EDITION 2016

There are a whole host of day to day management tasks that need to be carefully carried out as well. Well-designed facilities will never compensate for poor attention to detail in this regard. Good maintenance of facilities is important also; maintenance is best carried out during the summer months.

Ventilation Good ventilation in buildings is required for health and performance of housed livestock. The purpose of ventilation is to supply oxygen-rich air and remove gases, odours, dust, bacteria and the heat and moisture generated by the housed livestock. Cows lose a lot of fluid every day; up to 5 litres from breathing and through the skin, 20 litres from urine and 30 litres from faeces. Look out for damp bedding/mats due to high humidity and condensation. The presence of a lot of cobwebs, staining and drip lines on purlins and rust spots on metal cladding also indicate a problem.

Avoid draughts in cow housing, particularly draughts at ground level which could cause chilling of the udder. Chilling of the udder reduces the cow’s ability to fight infection from bacteria that have penetrated the teat canal. Look out for poor occupancy of cubicles close to open doors. Don’t allow cows to stand in draughty yards after milking in cold weather as the chilling affect will lead to chapping and cracking of the teats. The critical element which affects draughts is the internal airflow pattern established in the house. The airflow pattern does not change with the windspeed outside the house; however, the speed of air within the house is directly related to outside airspeed. Calving facilities Cows must have a clean dry environment for calving. They are very susceptible to infection around calving because their natural defence mechanisms are low. Calving facilities are inadequate on many farms and with compact calving and with planned expansion these facilities will be further stretched. Good calving facilities make it easier to prevent disease occurrence and spread. Weaknesses in inadequate facilities will show up, leading to increased losses, poor hygiene, extra costs, etc. Provide a straw bedded area for grouping cows prior to calving. Ideally, you would like to be able to divide this area into at least two separate areas side by side. Allow space for about 15% of the herd

PAGE 5

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER AUGUST EDITION 2016

at 10 to 12m 2 per cow. This space should include a straw bedded area and ideally a slatted area for feeding. Slurry, seepage and washings should also be collected in the tank. To minimise the spread of disease, the drainage and washings from calving boxes and group calving areas should be piped directly from these areas, and not be allowed to flow or seep across adjacent pens. Even though individual calving boxes seem to be going out of favour it is essential to have some individual calving boxes, for problem cases, etc. As a guide, at least 3 calving boxes for every 100 cows would be desirable. Have enough space in calving

boxes - at least 4.8m on one side by at least 3m. Have headgates – one per pen or one per two pens. A square pen of about 4.8m x 4.8m is desirable where no headgate is present. The design should prioritise health and safety. One safety feature worth considering is to face a headgate onto a passageway. This will allow you to secure an animal in the headgate before entering the pen. Provide headgates in group pens also. A host of other factors such as, routine milking machine maintenance and testing, correct liner change intervals, good milking routine, good hygiene, teat disinfection, etc., are just as important in preventing mastitis. However, if mastitis and somatic cell count are a problem in your herd then the points made above should also be addressed if they are contributing to the cause of the problem.

PAGE 6

CELLCHECK TIP OF THE MONTH CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER AUGUST EDITION 2016

Time for a change

ASSUMING you started the spring with a new set of liners, then it’s definitely time to change them now if you haven’t already done so. To help prevent mastitis, CellCheck recommends that liners are changed every 2,000 milkings, or every 6 months whichever comes first. For example, for the average Irish milk recording herd of 79 cows, if the full herd has been milking since March 1st in a 10 unit swing over parlour, the milking liners will have clocked up over 2,800 milkings by 31st August. These liners had completed 2,000 milkings by July 4th! Cluster liners are designed to flex and squeeze the teat during each pulsation cycle. This massages teats and maintains blood supply. While liners are working they begin to lose tension, absorb fat and hold bacteria. After too many milkings this can reduce the speed and completeness of milking, resulting in a loss in milk yield. It also increases teat end damage and increase the spread of mastitis bacteria. Fatigued rubber can also hold bacteria and this can increase the total bacterial count (TBC) if dirt is being trapped.

PAGE 7

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER AUGUST EDITION 2016

To calculate how many days it takes to reach 2,000 milkings, see page 52 of the CellCheck Farm Guidelines for Mastitis Control . Alternatively, estimate how often you should change your liners, based on the number of rows you’re milking:

No. of rows

Days between changes

So, if you’re milking 8 rows of cows, you should be changing your liners every 125 days, which is approx every 4 months

6 7 8 9

167 143 125 111 100

10 11 12 13 14

91 83 77 71

If you’re milking 11 rows of cows, you should be changing your liners every 91 days, which is approx every 3 months

For more details, see www.cellcheck.ie or watch our short video online – “When Should I Change My Liners?”

PAGE 8

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER AUGUST EDITION 2016

A Resource and Point of Contact for CellCheck Activities in your Area CellCheck Regional Coordinators

Paul Cullinan 087 2470803 Mayo/Sligo Aurivo

Brendan Dillon 087 2626851 Cork/Waterford/ Wexford/Wicklow Glanbia

1

5

4

1

Tom Starr 087 6697010 Tipperary/Limerick Arrabawn Co-op

Joe Moriarty 066 7163200 Kerry/Clare Kerry Agribusiness

2

6

7

8

6

John Fitzpatrick 086 0426567 Kilkenny/Laois/Carlow/ Kildare/Dublin Glanbia

Sinead Treanor 023 8822369 West Cork Carbery Group

7

3

5

2

3

Tom Downes 087 2564669 Longford/Monaghan Lakeland Dairies

4

Andrew O’Neill 086 1836505 Tipperary Tipperary Co-Op

8

PAGE 9

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9

Made with FlippingBook Annual report