1941

~tl'l-Qte STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE Buffalo. N 8W York

7947 [Im~

PUBLISHED FOR THE GRADUATING CLASS STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE BUFFALO, NEW YORl'1 '

1

I

:

1. ACADEMIC PROCESSION

THIS ISYOUR YEARBOOK-vivid memories of a happy,

,

2. DAYS FILLED WITH LAUCHTE',

exciting year. This is you, as you were in year 194 0 '

1941 , epitomized in snapshots and memos. The

CAMPUS FEATURES AND TRADITIOt>.:S

3, AND THESE SHALL NEVER DIE

ELMS staff this year has sought to preserve for you

HONORARY FRATERNITIES

those special fleeting moments, that happy combi-.

SOCIAL FRATERNITIES

nation of daily trivials and memorable events that

ORCANIZATIONS

have given this year its distinctive personality.

4· JUST WATCH THAT TEAM CO

From campus and classroom, from gymnasium

and ballroom, the staff has tried to place between

SPORTS

5. SING TO EACH CLASS

the covers of the ELMS, memories of what we, the

VERDANT FRESHMEN

students, have done between September and June.

BLITHE SOPHOMORES

It is our hope that you will find interest in these

SOPHISTICATED JUNIORS

pages today, love them in a year or two, cherish

STATELY SENIORS

them forever.

rare humor

cT1tlCal meditatioll

thorough scllOlar

hospitality " wetl dOlle"

historic(li "authority"

witty imerpretarioll

DEDICATION

To DR. ROBERT O. DEMoND, we dedicate this 1941 ELMS in appreciation of his conservative in– fonnality, unusual hospitality; and unequaled interpretation of Am.erican History. Spiced by his unique hurnor, stimulated by his Socratic questioning l his classes have been an inspiration to those of us who seek light ina world of darkness. His high standards of scholarship have won t he respect and admiration of students and colleagues alike.

Shadows . ...... .

Will always find my memory Deep in the bygone used to be And then once again in the hush of the twilight and shadows

You're with me

Shadows.

And every breeze that wanders by

Whispers to me ... your fond good-bye

Oh please remember the traditions that we've treasured

N.e'er let them die

I~

Echoes of the campus

Come and fill our hearts

, t

i

I I I

Give us just this memory

1

BeJore we depart

I 1

... -

.,

FACULTY

They stand before us, the finished product–

teachers. They are the models, after which we, the

raw material, shall be fashioned . With pride and

admiration, we look up to these experienced faculty

members. They are leading us along the "royal road

to learning." We see them as the symbols of academic

achievement we are striving to attain--our faculty

... the academic procession.

ADMINISTRATION

RALPH HORN D EAN OF M EN

Harry W. Rockwell. President OUR PRP..5IDENT , , , loquacious, magnetic, thorough ... the amateur who looks at the world,- some" times with mature optimism, sometimes with undeniable pessimism ... full of undying zeal for im~ proving campus life and campus activities ... severe critic, ever raising the standards beyond our reach.

CATHERINE E. REED DEAN Of W OMEN

I

I

HARRY J. STEEL Professor of Education, Director of Training J OHN M. THURBER Professor of English K ...... TE V. W OffORD Profl:ssor of Rural Education RAYMOND M. FRETZ A~istant Professor of Sdencc, Acting Dean of Men M. GEMMILL Assistant Professor of Science MINA S. GOOSSEN Assistant I?rofessor of English and Dramatics ANNA

MARTIlA S. PRATT Assistant Professor of Home Econorpics Education GEORGE M. QUACKENBUSH Assistant Professor of Vocational Organization

MARGARET S. QUAYLE A~istant Professor of Education

ESTHER F. SEGNER Assistant Profc9sor of Home Economic!! Education

RUTH E. SPEIR Assistant Professor of Music

K A THERYNE T HOMAS WHITTEMORE Assistant Profcssor of Geography

IRENE HIRSCH Assistant Profes90r of Education

GEORGE L. BOYD lnatructor in M athematics and Science

EILEEN MULHOLLAND Assista nt Professor of En:{lish

R OHERT E. A LBRIGHT Professor of Sociology, Director of Extension GRACE A. ALLEN Assistant Director of Training. AS!li!ltant Principal of the School of Practice CHARLES B. BRADLEY

EsTHJ!R M CGINNIs Professor of Home Economics

CHARLES A. MESSNER Professor of Languages

IRVING C. PBRKINS Professor of Vocational Education

Professor of Art EJucation SHERMAN G. C RAYTON Profcssor of EJucation R OBERT O. DEMoND Professor of History REUBEN S. EBERT Professor of Mathematics OSCAR E. HERTZBERG Professor of Psycholo~y RUTH E. H OUSTON

CHESTER A. Pu(;SLF.Y Professor of Elementary School Admini!;lration. Princip31 of the School of Practice

CHARLES C . R OOT Professor of Education. Dircctor of the Summer Session

MILDRED L. SIPP Professor of Home Economics PAUL W. SLOAN Professor of Education

I I

Professor of Health Education

23

22

I

MARGARET A. GRANT Instructor in Home Economics Education

A RLlNE JOI-INSON Instructor in Home &onomics Education

HARRY C. J OHNSON Instructor in Mathematics and Science. School of Practice

D ANIEL GROSSMAN Instructor in Art f RANCES G. HEP[NSTAlL Head Librarian CAROLYN W. HEYMAN Instructor. in Art DAVID R. H ODGIN Instructor in English GEORGE E. HUCKINS Instructor in Printing EDNA W. H URD Instructor in Music M ARY L. J AMISON Kindergarten Instructor, School of Prac tice

RUTH McLEAN KARCHER Instructor in Art

F AYB K BEVER Instructor in Home Economics

ISABEL HOUCK KIDENEY Registrar I NEZ M. KNAPP Instructor in Fourth Grade, School of Practice

MARY LOUISE M c MAHON Instructor in M usic

I

I'

GEORGE C. DECKER Instructor in Woodworking

HOMER A. BRUCE

Instructor in Education MARION A. CLARK Financial Secretary RUTH M. C LARK Instructor in Art VELMA R. C LARK instructor in Home Economics HUBERT E. COYER Instructor in Health Education and Coach HAROLD C. CRAIN Instructor in English

MARGARET D UPRE Instructor in Science

JOHN FONTANA

Jnstructor in Mechanics

Vm.C INIA M. FROST Instructor in Physical Education

HERTHA S, GANBY Instructor in English and Latin

ELEANOR M. G OVER Instructor in Sixth Grade, School of Practice ANDREW W. GRABAU Instructor iII English

A. CZURLI!S

STANLEY

Instructor in Art

P. D ANA Instructor in History

MARION

25

24

M . MELVINA SVEC Instructor in Geogra phy, School of Practice CHARLES A. VAll Instructor in Science WALTER B. WEDER I nstructor in Electricity D. KENNETH WINEBRENNER Instructor in Art

CHARLOT MOEHLAU FETTl!RMAN Assistant Manager of the Bookstore

MARY R. F ONTANA Manager of the Bookstore

MABEL B. GILBERT Cafeteria Director

,

CAROLINE KINSEY GORDNIER Alumni and Placement Secretary

. i

ROSAMOND OLIEF ABATE Assistant Librarian

I

ETHEL M. H. HANSEN College Nurse

ALEEN B EYER ACKERMAN Assistant in Extcn"ion Department. Director of Publicity MARION F. AYERS Assistant College Nurse HARRY W. CURTIN Superintendent of Bllildings and Grounds

L. ONODY Assistant Registrar

AMALIA

KATHRYN S. GRAHAM Senior Stenographer

II 'I ' t .. . 'iI

LESTER B. MASON Instructor in History MARTHA G. METZ Instructor in First Grade, School o,f Practice EDWARD L. M ORRICE Instructor in Methods and Practice Teaching MAYC. NYE Instructor in Home Economics

THERESA A. ROEHSLER Instructor in Second Grade, School of Practice

M ILDRED S. ROESSER Instructor in History

HAROLD]. ROESSER Instructor in Science

Au"fA R. ROUDEBUSH Instructor in Home Economics

STELLA O'REILLY Instructor in Fifth Grade, School of Practice

WINIPRED SALOM Instructor in Health Education

RUTH PALMER instructor in Home Economics HAROLD F. PETERSON Instructor in Economics and History

MURIEL S. SHOEMAKER Instructor in Third Grade, School of Practice

GERTRUD!! ROACH Instructor in Health Education

MARGUI~RITE STOCKBERGER Instructor in History and Social Studies, School of Practice

26

27

AGNES H. LOUCHREN Stenographer

HAZEL S. BLATT Steno~rapher JANE L. DrAoOARIO Stenographer BERDENA C. DOLBERG Stenographer

MARyM. MAY Stenographer

G. FORNES

ROSEMARY

Stenographer

Local Board of Visitors

EDWARD H: BUTLER MOREY C. BARTHOLOMEW

President Secretary 'Treasurer

WILLIt\M WARREN SMITH

THOMAS B. LOCKWOOD

DANIEL]. KENEFICK

ALBERT HART HOPKINS HELEN Z. M. RODGERS

28

29

FEATURES

The long procession passes before your eyes. You as you arc

at work; you as you are at play. The kaleidoscope of college

life- you full of Christmas spirit; merrily decorating at Holly

Hanging; you in all your elegant finery, Jreamily dancing at the

Junior Prom and the Senior Ball. Good times of a glowing year

arc now marching memories--HXX) lusty voices ringing out at

Interclass Sing; that gaiety at Moving-Up Day; and the thrills

and excitement of Stunt Night. Preserved here arc the cherished

fleeting moments which would have escaped us forever ... tbe

days filled with laughter and friendships.

Delta, Alpha, Phi, Omicron and all the rest .. . secret mottoes and pledges wreathed in a Greek name _.. promises of undying de~ votian , . , and loyalty ... new found brothers .. that extra' special smile from someone ... that meaningful glint in a sister's eye .. , dances with those you love, your fraternity pals and your best beaux ... bull,sessions · _. intimate meetings ... special news .. , special jokes . .. doing things together . sales in the student center, selling everything from green carnations to cookies · .. dances in the gym ... eti' quet te for sorority study tonight . . binding friendships that will live always, .. Long after the rnem.ories of A 'g and e'g have dis, appeared, there will be thoughts of jolly get-togethers .. . parties with other fraternities and soror' ities . . . Inter,fraternity Ball every fall ... symbol of extended good fellowship . . . pride in showing off your date, .. fratern~ ity pins hung on your favorite girl ... rushing season ... meet' ing people ... judging ... weigh- ing . , , deciding ... pledging ... dressing in grotesque outfits. perfonning humiliating tasks ... carrying pails and wearing ear' rings and hair bows . .. laughed at .. . and laughing , , . drawn closer and closer into the bond of brotherhood ... 'Pan-Hel dance · . , everyone radiant .. , new gowns of pale billows , . , Of sleeky sophisticated formals . . . best fellows in attendance . . . meeting your sorority sisters' "one and only" , .. parting at graduation ... joining alumni chapters .. coming back to meet' iogs to reminisce . .. and sigh.

First whiff of real .college . first green days filled with mas– sive name tags, unsure "hellos" to austclc upperclassmen . Alma Mater sung as solo, as a duet, even as a chorus . .. propo~ sals in the most awful places and at rnost inconvenient times ... baby dolls ... balloons, peanuts by the nose along a grating side– walk . . . piles of books to be carried for those silly sopbs . signatures, signatures and still more autographs ... frosh court brings out hidden talent ... at the end comes the tug-of-war; one last chance to show the sophs who's who ... Then frosh camp · .. gangs of scared newcomers ... complacent upperclassmen taking competent charge ... describing the joys and good times of college life ... hiking through the color– ful woods . .. do you come from Podunk' Oh, do you know B1u B1uefuss' ... how about a set of tennis . .. you see that teacher over there? They say she gives horrible tests ... skits tonight . . . what'll we do? Treasure hunt? · .. ah, suckers in the treasure chest .. . sunny Sunday morning · .. the last breakfast .. . good– bye .. . but it's the beginning of a college career at State . . . As long as you live will you ever forget the scene of the tower sil.– houetted against the sky in the moonlight ... or the campus com~ pletely buried under a blanket of snow . .. School of Practice .. . student teachers dashing in .. . and out ... wild~haired geniuses carting huge drawings into the art school . . . all these.bec0me a part of the you that's going to college ...

33

32

Campus life .. . the glorious tra' ditions that will never fade from spirited hearts ... the winter holiday season begun with holly hanging ... pungent laurel draped gracefully along t he halls .. . tiny pines and a large one ... holly .. . sprigs of inviting mistletoe . .. a stuffing Christmas dinner . . . M iss Gilbert's best turkey ... the Christmas play, , . hosts of heavenly beings .. stalwart shepherds ... an exquisite ma' donna . .. an adoring and humble Joseph ... a sudden strong reali- .ation of the deep truth that un– derlies all the fun ... In terclass Sing. , , early in the fall, , . first important event of the College year . .. ganlenias in the Seniors' hair .. . pom-pams for the Sophs · .. a rom.antic silhouette by the Freshmen . . . Juniors on a portico Booded with moonlight ... 50ft lights, , . A lma Mater . .. Seniors review four years of Sings, from Three lllind Mice on through a host of sentimental tunes ·that they have made their specialty . . , Juniors. Prosh do creditably, .. Sophs come through to win the banner after a d ose tussle . . . Junior Prom . .. roses ... best gowns ... best beaux . . . smooth orchestra for light hearts ... an olel·fashioned walt" ... swift. swirling rhythm . .. vL1cation farewells ... the merriest Christ, mas ever . .. Stunt N ite ... One, two, three, kick ... one, two, three. kick ... the conga, , . tbe cake . . . Seniors risking their necks and johs to win first prize · . . Sophomores spouting verse and chasing a poor, lone, defense– less male . .. Home Ec Sophs bak– ing as usual ... lovely senoritas trying to vamp senOIs who L1re too la.y to be vamped ... Pancho looking for Dr. Peterson ... Ben- i to looking for Dr. Peterson . where is the Doc 7 ... a giggling audience ... a howling L1udience · .. sLlccess!

A long in the spring CaInes Pan- Hellenic day ... sorority spirit comes through . .. embroidered Greek emblems . , , Before long the Y Carnival pitches its tent on campus . . . dart throwing . _ . ring tossing .. _fortune tel1ing in slnall mysterious havens . . . hot dogs fresh from the fire ... flow- ers . . . candy _ . . a turn-of-the– century root-heel' garden ... pea' nut shell bracelets . . . gaudy cos' tumes _ .. hlare of music .. _at the end, dusty. exhausted. happy ... Spring Concert ... youthful blending of happy voices, .. the first harbinger of the new season . , . the Glee Clubs all dressed up in extra special gowns and best voice ... Band out of jackets and into formal attire ... male war– blers strong and sincere, pene– trating . .. talented soloists ... crowning glory, the Wom~n's Senior Glee Club .. . hannomous combination of sweet song .. _ glorious song, glorious presenta– tion .. . a State tradition as stau11ch as the pillars . .. our own culture. __ a symbol of talent _.. an honest effor t . . . a glorious achievem.ent ... our contribution to the finer things of life , .. like· wise the Spring Play ,. cyn ic G. B. Shaw's "Arms and t he Man" .. . the choicest Thespians glamorous Marion as the major's daughter, . . Ralph. t he enemy hero ... intrigue _ . . ad– venture ... fight to a romantic finish . . _ <'.n excellent work _ .. dramatics extraordinary . __ su' perior costumes . . . lights and scenery . . . hours of gruelling practice hring triumph, a glorious success to Miss Goossen's cast .. a four-star producrion .. . Add to all these shopping at the Co-op, studying in the friend– ly library at night ... badminton in the Gym, griping over, and en' joying the School of Pract_ice, lounging in the Social Centers, and exploring the num.erous hoxes in the Student Center ... These make up the non-academic part of a college careel . . .

34

35

Moving-Up Day, 1940 ..• Dark assembly filled with t•.e hush of anticipation . .. a gleam– ing stage with the royal throne in the center ... into the silence the strains of stately martial music fi rst creeps, then pours forth .. down the aisles float lovely w isps of femininity .. . huge bouquets of riotous spring blossoms ." thenHer Royal High– ness ... the queenliest beauty of them all ... a gracious smile .. . ooh ... Then the court in ses' sian ... Seniors reminisce ... Juniors brag . .. Sophomores strut · . . Freshmen prolnise grand achievements. . those to leave lay down their blooms . . . they are soon picked up ... the torch to be carried forward. . each class member gives up his flower, the symbol of his rank ... and assumes another. . one more year gone by so swiftly .. . so full . , . now another rung to climb on the ladder to the summit · . . another challenge to be met and conquered . . . for the Fresh~ men, the first step forward . . . half· way mark for the Sophomores · .. on to the end for the Juniors · .. a regretful finis murmured from the full hearts of the Seniors. On to the parade ... a lovely Spring day . . . sun·filled, clear and windy . .. beautiful girls on the back of a con....ertible . . . float models in flimsy garb shiv, ering and smiling . . . parade of progress on a fraternity float. streamers of gaudy crepe~pa per · .. virile men, -showing t heir brawn . , . huge heads on the A. K. K.-ers ... bulky but empty heads ... parade of floats winding out of the drive . . . gangs of spectators jogging alongside the creeping trucks ... back to Alma M ater . . . back to the crowd gathered on the portico ... ex~ cited, cheering, predicting, an~ ticipating ... watching the judges for a nod or gleam ... a breathless hush while the announcer ap~ proaches the mike ... third , second ... the winner !

State's Queen of the May for 1941 , , , dark, intelligent, soft spoken Joan, , ,her eyes like deep pools . .. haunting . .. myst.erious · . . her smile demure in spite of its quiet warmth ... willing to offer her assistance . . . with pru- dence and care ... reliable as the tower chimes . .. an unobtrusive friend .. wjsdOll1 profound as the deep sea , , , this is our May Queen . . . our choice for the Queen of '41. Ready to wait upon her majes– ty's word are the attendants . .. Seniors , .. Peggy ... a gay in– genue .. . sparkling, fhrtatious eyes . , . an Irish pug nose . .. and dimples ... friendly to all ... and perfectly lovable .. . Norma of the soft black hair ... penetrat- ing, understanding . .. and ever ready with sympathy ... com– panion alike to man and woman · . . Juniors send Arlene . . . cute · . . demure as the first breath of spring ... quiet with calm con- sideration ... disinclined to seek out recognition .. . Ruth, the sporty one ... black hair, intelli– gent eyes with sparkles of gayety · .. warm~hearted smile . .. ever ready for what comes . .. loyal · .. trustworthy . . . has a good time always ... Sophomore at~ tenclants ... Jean, the honey blond · . . perfect features . .. a brilliant smile ... blithe as a mocking bird · .. acts w ith charming absurdity · .. gay .. , fun, .. Isabel, , . full of charming naivety . . . with a hint of fascinating sophistication · .. soft eyes, . . young, refresh- ing ... American girlhood at its best .. . From the Freshman class · .. Betsy . . . sleek suavity . .. stately as a duches8 . .. streamy blond tresses . . . sometimes in pig-tails ... blue eyes clear as ice · . . soft spoken . .. a bewitching sll1iie .. . Mary . .. simple, dark and lovely ... sparkling eyes with knowing depths only slightly veiled in a da:2::2:ling smile . . . and quiet, dependable friendship. These are our court for the Moving-Up Day celebration.

37

36

o

HGANIZATlONS

The power behind the throne or the incentive behind 5eho1,

astic achievement is the organization. We have learned to fill

our days chuck full of extra,curricular activities. Every available

moment not <.levoted to academic work is spent in some absorb,

ing outside interest. We are caugh t in a stride which has swept

us into a dilemma of activity. We cover the campus news fever,

jshly~ we raise our voices in harmonious song in the glee cluhs;

we act behind the footlights like true thespians; we play ex–

pertly under the baton; we debate- all these afe outlets for

expression of engrossing interest .. . and these shall never die.

for outstanding leadership in college activities is a limited number of "brain trusts" who become m~mbers of Alpha Society through this traditional tapping ceremony. One of the outstanding successes of the year was the Leadership Day program at the Trap ane Field Club. There, the faculty ming\erJ freely with the "campus leaders," and discussed problems and philosophics of leadership. The next coup of Alpha was Organization Day. Tn a regular assembl y program, every organiz,ation on campus was pre-– sented to the College, chiefly for the benefit of the Freshmen. Sponsored by Alpha. the traditional Holly Hanging once more bedecked good ole' A lma Mater in her festive Christmas robes. T his year, the prite went to the Juniors for their clever transformation of the Student Center.

MEMBERS

W ILLIAM EXTON

BERTHA D EMBOWSKI

RUTH ALBRICHT

R OBERT P OTTER

J EAN MAYER

CHARLES MCCARTHY

CHARLES WEIGAND

CHARLES TURCOTT

B ETTY ScHREINBR

WILLIAM EXTON, Secretary,Treasurer

ALPHA " In Spring a young man's fancy turns to love," but here at State. everyone's faucy, regardbs or sex, turns to- Alpha. Ha ppy are those Juniors and Seniors who thrill to the " Tap" at the Senior Oal1. Selected

41

40

TAU CHAPTER

EPSILON PI TAU Office

January '940-4'

EPSILON PI TAU Only the cream of the Industrial College student body is selected for Epsilon Pi Tau member– ship. Not only n)Ust a memher be a Junior or Senior in the Industrial Arts Department, but, as a further qualification, he must be in the upper quartile of his classes. Those who do survive the rigorous requirements are well~suited to pursue the primary purpose of Epsilon Pi Tau in its work to further development and research in the Industrial Arts field. This national honorary society, the first in New York, seeks to stimulate scholar!3hip, leadership, and professional prolnise.

CHARLES F. TURCOTT LINDSAY G. FARNAN J. HASLETT PAUL E. DAUCHER HUGH

Presidel1t Vice- Presiden t; Treasurer Recording Secretary Corresponding Secretary

KENNETH PHILLIPS JOSEPH S. ZAHM HAROLD G. GIl.BERT BOYD P. CAMl'BELl

F. WEIGAND

CHARLES

CARLTON]. GER8RACH T

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF '41

CHARLES BALL

PAUL DAUCHER

LINDSAY FARNAN

HUGH HASLETT

WARREN H!!LWIC

WILUAMSrON

CHARLES TURCOTT

CHARLES WEIGAND

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF '42

RALl'H BRIGHTON

BOYD CAMPTIELL

CARLTON GERBRACHT

HAROLD GILBERT

PETER LUCAS

KENN~TH PHILLIPS

GRANT WETTLAUfER

JOSEPH ZAHM

FRATRES IN FACULTATE

IRVING C. PERKINS GEORGE C. DECKER

JOHN FONTANA GEORGE E. HUCKINS

42

GAMMA MU CHAPTER

KAPPA DELTA PI

OPl'ICERS

DAVID O. COOKE BETTY SCHREINER MARGUERITB REINHARD MARIAN SONTHRIM ANNE GOULD

Prestdent V ice-President Recording Secretary Corresponding Secretary Treasurer

KAPPA DELTA PI The "upper crust" comprises the membership of the Gamma Mu Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi. Membership is limited to only those Juniors and Seniors who attain high scholastic standin~ and who .show an interest in the advancement of education. Kappa Delta Pi takes care of the Dean's Tea which is an annual affair given for all the students who make the Dean's list.

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF '41 FRANCES CAROTHERS RICHARD COUGHLIN

ARTHUR CARR BERNICE FRANKS WINIFRED JENNER ROflERT PECK AARON SIMON JOAN TARRANT FRANCES WEISSMAN

ALBERTA BROWN DAVID 0, COOKE

GRACE HIMMELE BEATRICB MINKEL BETTY SCHREINER MARIAN SONTHEIM

ANNE GOULD JEAN MAnR MARGUEIUTE REINHARD BBTTY JANE SMITH MARY TAYLOR

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF '42 JEANNE M c MAHON BARBARA RUDOLPH EsTHER WEINSTEIN FRATRES IN FACULTATE

MARIA CORSI MARION PIERCE

EARL OBERMEYER RUTH VIOX

REUBEN S, EBERT D ANIEL GROSSMAN CHESTER A. PUGSLEY MARGUERITE STOCKI3ERGER HONORARY MEMBERS hVING C. PERKINS CHARLES C. ROOT

SHERMAN C. CRAYTON CAROLINE K. GORDNIER

D. KENNETH WINEBRENNER ANNA M. GEMMILL IRENE HIRSCH MARGARET S, QUAYLE KATE V. WOE'FORD

STELLA O'REILLY PAUL W. SLOAN MILDRED L. SIPl'

CATHERINE E. REED

RALPH HORN HARRY W. ROCKWELL

44

45

NU LAMBIJA SIGMA

OPfICERS

President Vice"PresidenL Treasurer Recording Secretary Corresponding Secretary

LUCILLE BEARDSLEY

JEANNE PIPER

NU LAMBIJA SIGMA Active on campus for the last sixteen years, Nu Lambda Sign'la, honorary literary sorority, en– courages in its ll:clllcers a genuine interest in reading. Each year the organization investigates il specific phase or type of literature. New rnembers are chosen from honor students in the composition courses, and those showing unusual literary interest.

ESTHER HOAG

R UTH MILLER

JEANNE MANNEAR

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF '41

THELMA ABEL

EVA BALDWIN

LUCILLE BEARDSLEY

JOYCE BiWWN

VERA BURCK LEY

KAY CZRRNIEJEWSKI

BERTHA DEMROWSKI

M,\RGARET ESCIINER

JANE EVANS

MARY GRAHAM

NORMA GRt:SSELL

GRACE Hn"tMELF.

WINIFRHD JENNER

RUTH KRIEMAN

KATHLEEN LAPPIN

EDITH MARTIN

BEATRICE M INKEL

JEANNE PIPER

JOAN TARRANT

MARY TAYLOR

RUTH TRAVIS

JEAN VEDDER

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF '42

SARAH BARNES

CAROL FRAZEE

VERN HECK

EsTHER HOAG

JEANNE MANNEAR

RUTH MILLER

RUTH OWEN

MARJORIE PHILLIPS

EsTHER WEINSTEIN

SORORES IN FACULTATE

G. HEI'INSTALL

FRANCES

EILEEN MULHOLLAND

47

46

MU CHAPTER

PHI UPSILON OMICRON

Phi Upsilon Omicron There's an old saying, "When cooks get together, they talk shop," Not so, however, with Phi Upsilon Omicron, National Honorary Fraternity of the Home Economics Department. Instead, the organization seeks to establish and strengthen bonds of friendship, promote the moral and in~ tellectual development of its members as well as to advance Home Economics. The Mu Chapter was established on this Campus in 1924 and from that time on has been active in school life. Besides helping to maintain the Bureau of Instructional Materials, Mu Chapter con~ tributes to the national plOfessional work of consumer education. Then, too, Mu Chapter has social tendencies, which it exercises by entertaining the Freshmen each yellr.

OffICERS

President Vice-President Secretary

BERNICE FRANKS

BETTY OCHREINER

ELEANOR KAY BRANT

'Treasurer Chaplain Historian and Librarian Editor

FRANCP.s CAROTHERS

ELEANOR WILLIAMS

RUTH ALBRIGHT

ELLEN HlRSEMAN

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF '41

EU::ANOR KAY BRANT

FRANCES CAROTHERS

RUTH ALBRIGHT

BERNICE PRANKS

MARJORIE HAFFA

ANNE GOULD

MURIEL LEVER

HELEN JOHNSON

MARY HUSSEY

RUTI-J NOBLE

BETTY SCHREINER

JEAN MAYER

ELEANOR WILLIAMS

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF '42

MARY LUTZ MADELINE Y UELf..S

ELLEN HIRSEMAN

MURIEL FRENCH

EUDENH SCHENCK

MARJORIE PEIRCE

SORORES IN FACULTATE EsTHER MCGINNIS ESTHER F. SEGNER

MARTHA S. PRATT MILDRED L. SIPP

FAYE KEEVER

R. ROUDEBUSH

ALMA

48

49

I

I , 'f ,

SIGMA UPSILON

OffICERS

E. CLARKE RALPH L. SMITH

Sigma Upsilon

President Vice-President Treasurer Secretary Debate Ma.nager

GERALD

Sigma Upsilon is a National Honorary Literary Fraternity. Alpha Delta Chapter was founded at State in 1931, the first teachers college chapter to be chartered. Meeting at Dr. Thurber's home, the group this year spent many a Wednesday night discussing poetry, English in the public schools, drama as literature, and personal experiences with literature. A highlight of Sigma Us activity this year was the successful sponsoring of a college debate team. Besides entertaining the faculty and students with an unusual and enlivened home debate during an assembly program, this team successfully met such rivals as Niagara University, McMasters University, Canisius College, and Syracuse University.

GLENN MORRISON

BERNARD ROSTAD DAVID O. COOKE

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF '41

RICHARD COUGHLIN WILLIAM EXTON TYRIL McCoy ROBERT PECK THOMAS SMITH

DAVID COOKE DONALD DONLEY ROBERT GRIPFIN GLENN MORRISON

HAROLD BEAL DAVID COWNIE MILTON GUll..VITZ CHARLES MCCARTHY MORRIS RAIKEN

AARON SIMON JAMES SWEET

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF '42

BOYD CAMPBELL MURDOCK CUNNINGHAM BERNARD ROSTAD

GERALD CL/\RKE ROBERT MARKS RALPH SMITH

WILLIAM CALLAN IRVING COHEN ROLAND MURPHY

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF '43

DONALD]OSEPII

HOWARD BAEUMLER GOMER LESCH

EDWARD GREEN.E DONALD VOLTZ

FRATRES TN FACULTATE CHARLES A. MESSNER PAUL W. SLOAN

CHARLES C. ROOT JOHN M. THURBER

ANDREW W. GRABAU HAROLD F. PETERSON

50

51

"

PAN-HELLENIC

OfFICERS

MARY B UECHNER CATHERINE CROCUSTON MARY JANE OELKERS JEAN MAYER MARGARET S. QUAYLE

President Recording Secretary Corresponding Secretary 'f rea.surer Faculty Advisor .

Pan- HBllenic The Greeks had their central governing body, so State's sororities have theirs-Pan-Hellenic. As the name implies, this organi~ation embraces all the social sororities on campus. This year, Pan~Hellenjc has aimed to help non-sorority girls understand more fully the privileges and joys offered by membership in a sorority. Since freshmen were ruled eligible to be rushed in the spring, Pan-Hellenic invited all freshman girls to a party in the gym. Games, box lunches, and intimate discussion groups made the party a complete success. Nineteen forty-one saw a new and different Pan-Hellenic day. For the first time, the dinner and dance were held off campus, at the Hotel Buffalo. A record crowd of one hundred seventy-five girls attended.

, I

MEMBERS

Alpha Sigma Alpha

MADELINE Y UELLS

JEAN MAYER

NORMA WILLIAMS

Alpha SIgma 'Tat!

ESTHER Y ACKUBOSKIE

CATHERINE CROCUSTON

MARJORIE PEIRCE

Delta Sigma Epsilon

LOIS JOHNSTON

MARY JANE OELKERS

NORMA KRAUSE

Pi Delta 'Theta

~

RITA HOLLANDS

MARY SCOTT

MAY STRIPP

~l:,::

Pi Kappa Sigma

EDITn HEFFELFINGER

MARY BUECHNER

JEAN PADGINTON

' e

-

~

Sigma Sigma. Sigma

PATIENCE ELSTON

MARGARET MCCULLOR

WINIfRED JENNER

'Theta Sigma UpSIlon

l

'~.

DOROTHY THOMAS

RUTE KRIBMAN

MURIEL LEVER

52

53

ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA

PI PI CHAPTER

Alpha Sigma Alpha Romance will never die at State, or at least not as long as Alpha Sigma Alpha continues to present love-seats to the College on Moving-Up Day. This year's gift is the third to be added to the quad– rangle. Although Alpha Sigma Alpha made the college see red, don't yell "Communist." Red only characteri"ed the very effective Fireman's Ball, which it sponsored in the fall.

OfFICERS

President Vjce~President

NORMA WILLIAMS CAROL F KAZEE RUTH ALBRIGHT ELEANOR KAY BRANT RAMONA BARNES RUBY FITCH E LEANOR THOM

Secretary Trea.surer Editor Chaplain Registrar

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF '41 RAMONA BARNES Vm.GINIA COHO GERALDINE HARMON JUNE PERRY BETTY J EAN WILLIAMS NORMA WILLIAMS

RUTfr ALBRIGHT ELEANOR KAY BRANT MARY DWYER JEAN MAYER JANE W ANTSHOU8E

MIRIAM BEUTHER MARJORIE DUTHIE MARY HUSSEY MARGUE1UTE REINHARD ELEANOR WILLIAMS

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF '42

EsTHER HOAG NORMA MUNGER LUCILLE SWICK

CAROL FRAZEE MARY LUTZ

RUBY FITCH JEAN I\LEPPMAN JOAN RICK ELEANOR THOM

EUDENE ScHENCK MADELINE YUELLS

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF '43 MARGARET BROWN WrNNIFRED KENDALL ROSEMARY RATHMAN

MARJORIE FRISBEE MARIAN MOLLNOW AMY SMITH NATALIE WILLIAMS

MARGERY BENNETT EDITH GAUl'I'

OLGA PARENTI JANET STOWELL

SORORES IN FACULTATE ROSAMOND O. ABATE

CAROLYN W. HEYMAN

5\

55

ALPHA SIGMA TAU

SIGMA CHAPTER

O f fICERS

President V ice- President ftecording Secretary Corresponding Secretary

MARJO lUE P EIR.Cl!

RUTH FOSTER

GRETCHEN KAUTZ

Alpha Sigma T ilti The fragrance of red roses transformed the bustling Student Center into an avenue of romance when Alpha Sigma Tau, second oldest sorority on campus-, held its annual flower sale. In March, the sorority held Skyline &ers in the gym. Immediately after exams comes the annual house, party at Lime Lake where it is easy to drown, among other things, one's sorrows. Again this year a scholarship award of one hundred dollars was presented to a deserving non'sorority girl. The identity of the recipient is kept a secret from all but the deciding committee.

KATHLEEN GOODMAN

'fTcasurer Chaplain H istorian

FRANCES KRAINZ

EUNICE TEPAS

G eORGIA FRESE

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF '41

CATIlERINR CROCUSTON

RUTH FOSTER J BAN R OBINSON

FRANCES KRAINZ

MARIAN SONTHEIM

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF '42

LAURA MAE EHMAN

G EORGIA FRESE

KATHLEEN GOODMAN

RUTI.. O CHS

EUNICB Tt:PAS

M ARJORIE PmRCE

ESTHER Y ACKUBOSKlt:

DORIS WATERWORTH

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF '43

HELEN BROOKS

FRANCES PTWOWARCZYK

SORORES IN FACULTATE

MARGARET S. QUAy r.E

57

56

DELTA SIGMA EPSILON

ARETHUSA UPSILON CHAPTER

O FFICERS

President Vice' President T reasu.rer . Recording Secretary Corresponding Secretary Chaplain Sergeant Historian

NORMA KRAUSE BERYL CRAIG EMILY MAR BUTLER LrLUAN BUDDENHAGEN MARY GRAHAM BETH GOODfEllOW

Delta Sigma Epsilon Delta Sig, having completed the furnishing of its green and rust sorority room, held meetings and entertained there this year. When Delta Sigs held the annual cookie sale in February, for an entire day the whole college, stuuents and faculty ;ncluded, went about munching cookies. The girls honored their mothers this year, as every year, at a Mothers' Day tea. In addition to a magaz.ine subscription which the sorority presents annually to the library, it awards the Bishop Honor Medal to the senior girl who has participated most effectively in student life. r- ..

MURU!L HOLMES EUZA1:U!TH PELL

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF '41

EorcE ANDERSON BERYL CRAIG

EMILY MAE BUTLER MELROSE FRANKLIN NORMA KRAUSE

LILLIAN BUDDENHAGEN B ERTHA DEMBOWSKI M URfP.L H OI,MES MARGARET M c DONOUGH B STTY SCH LOTZER JEAN TILLOU

MARvGRAHAM ELI'LABETH MAUL E LIZABETH PELt VIRGINIA SHANAHAN

MARY J ANE OELKEIIS BETTY ANN SEIBERT MARY GERTRUDE VIVEREn 'E

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF '42

LOIS J OHNSTON

BETH GOODfELLOW

[3F:VF.RLY J UNE

EVELYN WALTERS

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF '43

ARLINE FRANK SYBIL HUTCHINSON BETTY YOUNGBERG

ANNA BELLE FITZGERALD MARJORIE HUETTER

J EAN DALY HELEN GILDRRSLEEVE MARGARET MARY WOEFPt:L

PLEDGES J fA N HAMMERSMITH MARGARET RUSSELL

MARGARET M CGOVERN NANCY LEE SMITH

ELIZABETH DELANEY JEAN REEVES

SORORES IN FACULTATE

MARGARET A. GRANT

MILDRED L. SIl' I'

RUTH PALMER

59

58

PI DELTA THETA

ZETA CHAPTER

O FFICERS

President

MAY STlUI'P

Vice~President Alumni Chairman Secretary

MARGARETTE TOLMSA

Pi Delta Theta

J ANE EVANS

PRANCES ALBERTS

Treasurer R egistrar Editor Chaplain

Early in the fall Pi Delts got together with Theta Sigs in the college gym to swing a Melody Lane,

R ITA H OLLANDS

EVELYN FRlEDL

complete with grace notes and smooth syncopation. On Founders Day in February the girls celc-

J ANE EVANS

brated with a banquet at which. they entertained their mothers as honored guests. As a herald to

JANET LEWIS

sweet summertime, Pi Delts, on May I, sold flowers from their Student Center garden.

MEMJ3ERS OF THE CLASS OF '41

FRANCES ALBERTS

J ANE EVANS

MARY ScOTT

MAY STRIPl'

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF '42

KATHLEEN LINK

RITA HOLLANDS

MARGARETTE TOLSMA

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF '43

EVELYN F RIEDL

B ETTY HUB BARD

JANET LEWIS

SORORES IN FACULTATE ELEANOR M. GOVER MAY D. R OOT

ALEEN B. ACKERMAN

I RENE HIRSCH

61

60

PI KAPPA SIGMA

RHO CHAPTER

OJ:lflCERS

President . V ice-President Recording Secretary . Corresponding Secretary Treasurer &.'rgeanc-at'Arms Keeper-of-the-Archives Editor

J EANNE PADGINTON RUTH BLACKER H ELEN KOWALSKI P HYLLIS KENYON H ElEN j OIiNSON ELAINE COLE EDITH HEFFELFINGER HELEN JOHNSON

Pi Kappa Sigma

Pi Kaps became very domestic this year, producing dresses, bonnets and mittens of pale bh.le corduroy, embroidered with the Greek sorority emblems. On one day the sorority filled the Student Center with culinary lusciousness in the form of apple suckers for the traditional sale. Romance was encouraged on another occasion when gardenias were sold to the romantically inclined by Pi Kap cupids. "Starlight, Starbright, Let's all have fun tonite," was the theme of this year's campus dance sponsored by the girls.

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF '41

MARY B UECHNER PHYLLIS KENYON MARJORIE RO:::E

BLAI NE COLE HP.LEN KOWALSK I

H EI.EN ] m 'INSON HELEN MERENA

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF '42 RUTn B LACKER J BANNE P ADGINTON

SHIRLEY ADAMS EDITH H EPl'ELFINGER

RUTH H UPPUCH TH f!RESA PETRAS

MEMBER OF THE CLASS OF '43

SONJA HUGO

PLEDGES F LORENCE COGfJILL ELEANOR MINTRUM

HELEN ACLE E ILEEN H EALY

JEAN GORDON J UNE R OST

SORORES IN FACULTATE

S. GANEY

M ARY FONTANA

H ERTHA

EsTHER M CGI NNIS

63

62

I '

SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA

ZETA CHAPTER

Ol'l' ICERS

President Vice-President Conesponding Secretary Recording Secretary Keeper of Grades Treasurer

WINIfRED TENNER LOIS K"ROENIG

MARION PIERCE MARION PRICE MARGARET MCCULLOR A. MARIE B ARKER

Sigma Sigma Sigma

,

Sigma Sigma Sigma has the distinction of being the oldest national sorority on campus. Tri,Sig, as

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF '41 MARGAR1":T ESCHNER MARZETi'A LATHAM BEATRICE MINKBL MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF '42 H ELEN BOLTON RUTH MILLER MARION PIERCE

MARIE BARKER MURIEL KlEPFER MARGARET MCCULLOR

it is better known, established the Zeta Chapter in 1911. As befitting such a distinguished sorority,

WINIl'lUm JENNER MARIE MAJ-IL MARTON PRICE

the members actively participated in the Red Cross "Bundles for Britain" campaign. Another feature

of a busy year was the presentation of the Upton Merllorial Scholarship to il deserving junior.

, I

ONNALEE BEL Lors KROENIG JANE NORTH

PATIBNCE ELSTON DOROTHY NICHOLS

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF '43

VIRGINIA BOYD JOYCE FLAMMANG BETTY KING

MARY I)OLAN WZLLENA HENRY LmLA KING

HARRIETTE EBIlLm GWENDOLYN JONES MARGUERITE SHEA

PLEDGES MARY BrSTOfF EILEEN QUINN

MARroN B ARTOW DOROTHY MAHL

JEANNE KLOCKE RUTn STERLING

SORORES IN PACULTATE THERESA A. ROEHSLER

ETHEl M. HANSEN

64

65

THETA SIGMA UPSILON

THETA CHAPTER

OFFICERS

M UR lEL LEVER

President V icc-President Secretary 'Treasurer

ALICE CHMURA

OUVE NICHOLS

Theta Sigma Upsilon Rose and silver conjure the picture of warmth blended with refinement, but to the Theta Chapter of Theta Sigma Upsilon those colors symbolize, in addition, the sorority's challenge to its members of loyalty anJ sterling qualities of mind and heart. Thus, it was only natural for Theta Sigma Up– silon to sponsor the Courtesy Day Tea in honor of the faculty and the other sororities on the campus.

HILDRED MULLER

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF '41

ALICE CHMURA

EVELYN CAGE

BET1'Y~ BROWN

MURIEL LEVER

RUTH KRIEMAN

MERIBETH DUNCKEL

OLIVE NICHOLS

HILDRED MULLER

MEMBER OF THE CLASS OF '42

DOROTHY THOMAS

MEMBER OF THE CLASS OF '43

I I'

DORIS HARRISON

PLEDGES

MARY GUILD

EsTHER DUDZIAK

SORORES IN FACULTATE

ALMt' R. ROUDEBUSH

ARLINE JOHNSON

MARGARET DUPRE

66

67

t

ALPHA CHAPTER DELTA KAPPA

First Semester

Second Semester ROBERT ISENBERG CHARLES BALL .CARLTON GERBRACHT RICHARD TEMLITZ WERNER ROGERS lR WIN KARCHMER RICHARD VROOMAN GEORGE M. PAGAN

OFFICE President Vice,President Corresponding Secretary Recording Secrewr)'

HAROLD GILBERT VERNON STRUB ROBERT ISENBERG G LENDON SEAMAN STEPHEN HARRISON CHARLF.S BALL HUGH HASLETT GEORGE M. PAGAN

Delta Kappa Delta Kappa officially has a roof over its head now. After months of continued labor by fraternity members, the rambling cottage on Richmond Avenue formally materialized into Delta Kappa head– quarters at a student-faculty housewarming party held last fall. State's Alpha Chapter played host to a state-wide convocation of Delta Kappa frdternities at its new lodging, In addition to presenting the Delta Kappa Scholastic and Athletic awards, and to providing a very complete social calendar, Delta Kappa again published their indispensable "little black notebook," the Student Directory,

'Treasurer Chaplain

Sergeant~at~arms House Manager

MEMIlERS CLASS OF '41

CHARLES BALL PAUL DAUCHRR IRVINC, FUHRMANN HUC,H HASLETT CLAYTON KAMINSKA

HAROLD BEAL ANTHONY DEScIPIO W ILLIAM GLASGOW WARREN H ELWIG GPORGE KOH N ROBERT POTTER SEYMOUR SOMMERS CHARLES TURCOTT CLASS Of '42 BOYD CAMPBELL THOMM DAVIS JOSEPH HAl'l'tlY EARL OIlt!RMI!Yl!R HENRY STAClIOWICZ RrCHAltD VROOMAN LEONARD Wrl'.LOPOLSKI CLASS OF '43

D.·wro CAPPII!LLO L INDSAY F ARNAN STEPHI!N HARRISON ROLlllln hENLlERG JOliN LESLIE GLI!NDON SEAMAN VERNON STRUB CHAR1.IlS WEIGAND .TOli N CHlAVARO CARLTON GERBRACHT PI!TI!R LUCAS GEORGE M . PAGAN RICHARD SWART GRANT WETTLAUFER

PATRICK PINTO WILLIAM SION ANGliLO SUOZZI

RALPH BRIC,HTON IRVING COHEN HAROLD GILBERT JOHN A. MATTISON KENNETH P HILLIPS RICHARD TEMLIT:;

JOHN ARMSTRONG EDWARD HELWIG GEORGI! PIEPER

WALDEMAR BoHM IRWIN KARCH MER FRATRES IN fACULTATE

CORNIlI.!US CANAVAN DONALD KUHN:; \VERNER ROGERS

Hm.tER A. BRUCE RAYMOND M. FRETZ

STANLEY A. CZURLES E DWARD L. MORRICE

HAROLD C. CRAIN .TOlIN FONTANA

69

68

t

BETA CHAPTER PSI PHI

First Semester

Second Semester DAVID L. COWNIE

OHICE

J. GRIFFIN

President V ice'President Treasurer

ROBERT

Psi Phi Psi Phi fraternity has as many faces as the tower clock. In 1930 it presented one face of the tower clock to the new College building, and has since taken the responsibility of taking care of all the clock's faces, Each year the Beta Chapter of Psi Phi fraternity compiles and distributes athletic schedules, sponsors a "jinx~burnjng" before the Corthnd game, and contributes to the social life of the college by offering noon~hour dancing. The annual dance, last of an exciting campus season, was the informal success of the year.

ROLAN D MURPHY

GEORGE KIRCH

J. GRIffIN

MARVIN TRUDELL DAVID L. COWNIE

ROBERT

Financial Secretary Recording Secretary Corresponding Secf(~tary Chaplain

MARVIN TRUDELL

DANIEL O'DONNELL

DANIEL O'DONNELL

WILLIAM EXTON

WILLIAM TRAUTMAN

DAVID O. COOKE

DAVID 0. Coon:

MEMBERS CLASS OF '41

GEORGE CocHRRN

DAVID CoOKE

DONALD DoNLEY

G~,ORGE K IRCH JO~El'J[ WITKA

WILLIAM EXTON

ROlJl!Il.T GIUPFIN

CHARLIlS MCCARTHY

CLASS OF '42

ROBRRT MARKS

HP.RBERT HILTON

ROLAN!) MURPtl¥

EDWARD NELSON

BERNARD ROSTAD

CLASS OF '43

CHARLIl8 CHRISTMANN

ALEX LORINCZ Roy REED

DANIEL O'DONNELL

CHf.STllR PALKA

ST.".NLllY SACtlA

MONTFORD SClJRAI!DI>R

ROIlI!RT ScHULTZ

EVIlRETT STEVENSON

DELLZON STOKES

GILBERT TAUt't'f{I!R

WILLIAM TRAUTMANN

MARVIN TRUDELL

DONALI) VOLTZ

FRANC[S WANDELL

FRATRES IN FACULTATE ROBERT O. DIlMoND

HUBERT E. COY!!R

RtlUIJEN S. EllERT

RALPH HORN

GIlORGE M. QUACKENBUSH

71

70

I I ,

!

,

\ '

RHO CHAPTER SIGMA TAU GAMMA

First Semester

Second Semester ALBERT D. CLARKE ROLLIN G. VOGAN JAMES A. SWEET

OfFICE

President

ROBERT PECK.

Sigma Tau Gamma Essential to all Buffalo State soc;al climbers, the Social Calendar is the annual gift of Rho Chapter, Sigma Tau Gamma. For its own members, Sigma Tau strives to foster fellowship atnong men entering the teaching profession and to help them advance in scholarship and leadership. In 1933 Rho Chapter became affiliated with the national organization of Sigma Tau Gamma, the oldest National Social Professional Education Fraternity in the country. Annually, this council awards keys to the two outstanJing members of its chapters.

Vice~President Corresponding Secretary Saga Reporter

HENRY NAWOTKA

HAROLD ROSENBAUM

LEON GRABER

HAROLD ROSENBAUM

Secretary 'Treasurer

losEPH ROMANO ARTHUR C. CARR

SOL ELPENBEIN

EDWARD RECKE

MEMBERS CLASS OF '41

NORMAN GALRMDO

Atl.TttUR C . CARR JOHN Kana ROBERT F. POCK

CHARLIlS GREMKI!

AU.I'.N OWEN

HOWARD MCCULLOUGH

JOSEPH ROMANO

ROnl!RT ScHAPER El.)w ARD ZlllGLllR

JAMES SWEET

JOHN WUJRK

CLASS OF '42

I

ELUOT CARl.80N

CLASS OF '43 ALUEI\.T D. CLARKI!

JACK H. CHARLI!S

ROlIIlRT Dun"om HENRY NAwon:A

MAYNARD FELDMAN

SoL ELF.I':NBEIN

EDWARD RECJ:a

HAROLD ROSEN(lAUM ROLLIN G. VOGAN PRATRES IN FACULTATE

JOIlN ScHULER

I I

ROllERT E. AWRIGIiT HARRY C. JOHNSON CHARLES A. V Air.

CHARLES B. BRADLI!Y Ctl1!3TER A. PUGSLEY

OSCAR E. HllRTZBllRG

PAUl. W . SLOAN D. KENNETH WlNERRENNER

WALTER B. WilBER

72

73

THE ELMS

Editor-in-Chiej Business Manager

BERTHA DEMBOWSKI RICHARD COUGHLIN

Elms "Memories of this year at State" is the theme the E LMS staff has tried to develop in this yearbook. How well we have done this is foryou to judge. In an informal style we have recalled the events and reproduced personalities which have given this college year its distinctive flavor. We believe that this "'1941 notebook" represents an improYement over the twenty-nine editions of the ELlvtS which have preceded it. Still leaving to our successors room for improvement, we give our best to the college-a true yearbook. wri tten and compiled by contemporaries as a lasting memory,book of this year on our campus.

AssISTANTS:

Associa.te Editor Associate Editor Art Editor

MitTON GURVITZ MARJORIE DUTHIE RAYMOND RYBCZYNSKI GERALD CLARKE HAROLD BBAL WILLIAM EXTON SYLVIA LEVIN KATHLEEN M cKENNA

Literary Editor Sports Editor . Features Editor 'f yping Editor College News Editor

STAFF: LITERARY JeAN DALY R UTU ROSEN JI!AN R1!1!v1!S WILLIAM SI)AO

ART

FEATURES

KATUI!RI Nl! COLI! DoROTH Y Bi.l!CHSTEIN Gp.on.Gt: C OClH!RN EII.PoIlN FnANK6 GLORIA R AWLEIGH M AR('),\RP.T M URRAY COLLEGE NEWS VIVII!NNP. ~fI LlER PATRICIA O'HERN BoYD CAMPRP.LT.

MURDOCH CUNNINGHAM MAlw Hussey Bl!nv KING COWAIW NI!UlON

BUSINESS

PHOTOGRAPHY

EUNICE THPAS I3ARllARA RU!)OlPli R UTH STfll!N SOPHIE ORK(S7. SPORTS NANCY Lm! SMITII CLAIR!! CROCKER L eONARD LIPSCHITZ VIRGINIA CoHO

STUART MYI!R~ MARY GRAHAM ALJlP-I\T RVDi YNSKI

TYPING

Hl![,I!N MANIlRY En.I!l!N HeALY EDNA GORDON

74

75

THE RECORD

Slate"Bids Farewell to 1940 6'radlillif'8

Lots of Luck to b'veryone in CQming Ordeal

II

II

State Teacher~ College at Buffalo

Thursday, June 6. 1940

No. 24 "nee Br!ngs Back HapPIi "'lmjlbell Dembowski Rudolph , Funetrnns at State I .:, .

',.,.,.

Plan \. Events Tu St~ Breakfast. .1>. Plalltin,!!. pI..· This yea) Flcck, of • Chul'~h, will ))1', the ba~rab ure h<'lrl ;11 the C

.1blications

~

,~ Cinn_ the S(:h jishmcut~ 01 Dav!'

.:r"···l-fcads Prepare to JVf!r As Present .ors Reacb End of ~cessful Season

Ithe numl><;r ~~ _"1 Rubcng cu' ve I go down {~ ·,hone his CUI') '\ we ('VH !,'5-y~h~1 N.B.- na ben The '~v('mcn " .l"., here h., '.".!)

.~ activiti~s of the annO\lIlCCn1oent .~l edi lor~ of the ~ation~. Boyd CnnlJ1. Dembowski, and hnve been cl~ct. .. d, The Elms, c~pl·cth·ely,

Su",)ay, June 16, ~ l will be follow~t! b' for the par~nts &njol'~, with lV chninnnn.

rI to '

The Record Since the members are weekly ousted, almost forcefully from the office, the Record is, in truth, the "latest thing on Campus," Also contributing to the slogan are news articles, gossip, and jokes. With its complete picture of campus life, and humorous references to the campus personalities, the Record is a true expression of what college is. Reorganiz:ed several times for efficiency, the staff now hoasts separate departments for news, features, business'management, rewrite, copy anJ proof, and make,up . News columns inaugurated during 1941 include: "Fraternally Yours," a scoop on sorority and fraternity life compiled by Jean Daly ; "Between the Headlines," a sampling of world events col, lected by Carlton Gerbracht; and "Weekend llookshelf" written hy Ruth Miller and Marie Dellas.

I I

76

77

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4-5 Page 6-7 Page 8-9 Page 10-11 Page 12-13 Page 14-15 Page 16-17 Page 18-19 Page 20-21 Page 22-23 Page 24-25 Page 26-27 Page 28-29 Page 30-31 Page 32-33 Page 34-35 Page 36-37 Page 38-39 Page 40-41 Page 42-43 Page 44-45 Page 46-47 Page 48-49 Page 50-51 Page 52-53 Page 54-55 Page 56-57 Page 58-59 Page 60-61 Page 62-63 Page 64-65 Page 66-67 Page 68-69 Page 70-71 Page 72-73 Page 74-75 Page 76-77 Page 78-79 Page 80-81 Page 82-83 Page 84-85 Page 86-87 Page 88-89 Page 90-91 Page 92-93 Page 94-95 Page 96-97 Page 98-99 Page 100-101 Page 102-103 Page 104-105 Page 106-107 Page 108-109 Page 110-111 Page 112-113 Page 114-115 Page 116-117 Page 118-119 Page 120-121 Page 122-123 Page 124-125 Page 126-127 Page 128-129 Page 130-131 Page 132-133 Page 134-135 Page 136-137 Page 138-139 Page 140-141 Page 142-143 Page 144-145 Page 146-147 Page 148-149 Page 150-151 Page 152-153 Page 154-155 Page 156-157 Page 158-159 Page 160-161 Page 162-163 Page 164-165 Page 166

Made with FlippingBook - Online catalogs