20160302 BHC Newsletter Spring 2016 FINAL

Disease control measures Ensure suckler calves suckle colostrum within 2 hours of birth. If not they should be fed 2-3L of colostrum with a nipple feeder or stomach tube Replace or top up bedding regularly in pens where calves are housed. To judge if bedding is dry enough: kneel down and when you get up, your knees should be dry. Isolate scouring calves (with their dams) to prevent spread to other calves. Anyone in contact with the calves should wash their hands and change their clothes and footwear after handling sick calves to prevent spreading the parasite on their clothing. On farms that experience severe problems with cryptosporidiosis every year, the calves may be treated with halofuginone lactate for the first 7 days. Treatment must be started from birth and continued daily for the first week. Halofuginone lactate does not prevent infection but it reduces the severity of the diarrhoea and the build-up of crypto in the environment. Cryptosporidiosis in humans Cryptosporidium parvum can be spread to people through contact with infected animal or contaminated food and water. To prevent human infections: • Farmers should wash their hands, change their clothes and footwear after handling sick calves. • Children, the elderly and immunocompromised people should not handle sick calves. • Farm owners should comply with all the regulations regarding the collection, storage and disposal of slurry and run-off water from animal buildings to prevent water contamination.

To test if the bedding is dry enough, kneel down and when you get up, your knees should be dry.

See the AHI leaflet Cryptosporidiosis in neonatal calves for more information [click here] .

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BEEF HEALTHCHECK

SPRING EDITION 2016

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