The Woodlands Edition - November 2019

THE WOODLANDS EDITION VOLUME 9, ISSUE 3 | NOV. 12-DEC. 9, 2019

ROBINSON IN REVIEW

Robinson Road in Oak Ridge North will receivemobility upgrades to enable further development on the corridor.

PATSY LANE DAILY TRAFFIC COUNTS 1

PROBLEM

Increasing traffic

The traffic count on Robinson Road is projected to nearly double at two of themain intersections in Oak Ridge North by 2040.

2013-14 * 2040

16,170

30,156

SOLUTION

Improvements beginning in 2019-20 include

2

WEST OF HANNA ROAD

8

widening Robinson Road, intersection redesigns and road realignment.

IMPACTS NowOpen, Coming Soon &more

11,660

2011

22,582

* 2040 *projected

2

PROBLEM

Accessibility

1

B I N S O N R D .

Pedestrian infrastructure is limited along Robinson Road.

SOLUTION

City plans include

adding sidewalks for pedestrians once road expansions are completed.

45

SOURCES:CITYOFOAKRIDGENORTH;BGE, INC./COMMUNITY IMPACTNEWSPAPER

N

12

TO-DO LIST Events and things to do

Improvements to overburdened corridor part of Oak Ridge North long-term planning Robinson Road key to city plans for future growth

continued small-town vision, Interim City Manager Heather Neeley said. “Our neighbors, our residents want this to stay a small bedroom commu- nity, which it was built for, but we’ll just have more development opportunities if we get the road xed,” interim City Manager Heather Neeley said. “We have the people, but there’s no ease

signalization of the city’s Woodlands Parkway overpass and widening of Robinson at Westwood Drive, was approved by Montgomery County in October. While the road’s complete redevel- opment is likely still years away, the city has examined commercial and expansion opportunities while balanc- ing ocials’ and residents’ desire for a

BY BEN THOMPSON Solving mobility problems asso- ciated with Oak Ridge North’s main thoroughfare, Robinson Road, has been a persistent priority for city ocials, residents and businesses in an eort to unlock more of the city’s development potential. A bid for the rst phase of Robin- son improvements, including the

HEALTH CARE HoustonMethodist TheWoodlands Hospital expansion

28

CONTINUED ON 64

The Woodlands-area nonprofits work to keep at-risk families in local housing and off streets Helping homeless people hidden ‘behind the trees’ The prominent amount of trees and parks in The Wood- lands area can obscure the presence of a homeless popu- lation in an area where the average household income is around ,, according to U.S. Census bureau data. According to a  homeless count from Hous- ton-based nonprot The Coalition for the Homeless,  people were living in shelters and  were living unsheltered in Montgomery County—a % increase BY ANDREWCHRISTMAN

IN THIS AREA, SOME PEOPLE FIND THE NEAREST PARK WHERE THEY

CAN SLEEP. IT [HAPPENS] OFTEN, BUT IT IS TWO OR THREE OF THEM THAT STAY IN THE PARK AND THEY LEAVE IN THE MORNING. —Shirley Grimes, director of Tamina Community Center

30

PUBLIC SAFETY Palmer Buck named fire chief

298 were counted in Montgomery County in 2019, a 54% increase from 2017. homeless people

across its district. 719 homeless students In 2018, Conroe ISD reported a total of

55

DINING FEATURE Hot Spot

SOURCES:CONROE ISD,THECOALITIONFORTHEHOMELESS/ COMMUNITY IMPACTNEWSPAPER

CONTINUED ON 66

communityimpact.com

Made with FlippingBook Learn more on our blog