Southwest Austin Edition - February 2020

SOUTHWEST AUSTIN DRIPPING SPRINGS EDITION

VOLUME 12, ISSUE 11  FEB. 26MARCH 24, 2020

ONLINE AT

2020 Camp GUIDE Summer

GUIDE

IMPACTS

DEVELOPMENT UPDATES

DINING FEATURE

31

6

14

37

Small-business owners navigating higher costs Data shows commercial rents, vacancies expected to increase Amy Sinclair, the owner of Cobalt Blue Salon, relocated her business from an old space on West William Cannon Drive that she had been leasing for 12 years to a newly constructed storefront at Lantana Place in Southwest Austin last fall. The cost of rent at Lantana Place, which opened in 2018, is higher than what she had been paying previously; however, she said the new space oered benets such as ample parking that had not been present at the older shopping center. Also, a growing list of tenants in the new retail center has her optimistic about her business. “Financially, it’s still a little tight in this new location now, and it’s a little crazy to build out a new space, but now that it’s done I’m very pleased with it,” she said. Commercial real estate professionals project that rents and property taxes in the southwest region of Travis BY NICHOLAS CICALE

Early voting began Feb. 18 for the 2020 primary elections in Texas. When poll results come in on March 3, Tra- vis County voters will know most of the nominees who will appear on their November ballot, where they will make choices for positions from U.S. presi- dent to county constable. Unlike past years, when that Novem- ber election comes, voters in Texas will no longer have the option to press one button to go straight down the ticket to vote for every candidate from one Nomore straight- ticket voting In Nov. 2018, 62% of local voters utilized single-party option BY JACK FLAGLER

VACANCY

square footage vs.

In the southwest Travis County commercial market, vacancy rates as well as the overall square footage of oce and retail commercial space for rent are forecasted to continue rising through 2023. Despite the increase in available units, rents and property taxes continue to rise in the area.

2019

2023

Vacancy projection for oce space 6.18%

10.49%

Square footage projection for oce space 15,520,489 SQ. FT.

17,169,953 SQ. FT.

Vacancy projection for retail space 3.6% 4.6% Square foot projection for retail space 9,446,606 SQ. FT. 9,872,297 SQ. FT.

LOST ticket

SOURCE: COSTAR GROUPCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

CONTINUED ON 40

In the last 20 years, straight-ticket voting has become increasingly popular.

Dripping Springs grappleswith options to protect growing public

Republican votes

Democrat votes

Total votes*

"It's not going to be

296,518

0% 20% 40% 60% 80%

116,597

67,061

if we have police; it's going to be when. When is the appropriate time?" TODD PURCELL, DRIPPING SPRINGS MAYOR

extraterritorial jurisdiction, according to city documents. Even with this growth, Dripping Springs has not moved to establish its own police department; it relies on the Hays County Sheri’s Oce to patrol the city and its ETJ.

BY OLIVIA ALDRIDGE

Dripping Springs has grown by nearly 82% in seven years, based on the U.S. Census Bureau’s Community Survey estimate released in Decem- ber. Although the city reports that 3,277 people live within the city limits, over 30,000 reside in the city’s large

SOURCE: TRAVIS COUNTY CLERKCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER *DOES NOT INCLUDE STRAIGHTTICKET VOTES CAST FOR LIBERTARIAN OR GREEN PARTIES.

CONTINUED ON 28

CONTINUED ON 42

communityimpact.com

Made with FlippingBook Online newsletter