Study Abroad Catalog_WEB

FINC 4300 International Finance (3) (GHA, GVA) Students develop a framework for understanding the environment in which the international financial manager operates. Foundations of global financial management, world financial markets and institutions, economic exposure, and transaction and translation exposure are examined in the course. Standard corporate finance topics such as capital structure, cost of capital, and capital budgeting are considered and expanded for multinational firms. Prerequisite: FINC 3210. FINC 4610 Advanced Investments (3) (GHA, GVA) This course is a continuation and expansion of FINC 4210, which provides an introduction to the area of investments. Focus in this class will be on non-equity investment opportunities and portfolio management. Prerequisite: FINC 4210. FLST 1000 Film and Television Appreciation (3) (VIE) Students learn the aesthetic and technological elements in moving pictures. The course traces artistic trends and critical theories and focuses on visual imagery, sound, story, acting, and directing to develop a critical framework for appreciating the artistic aspects of film and television. FLST 2060 Modern World Cinema (3) (VIE) Students learn the current trends, styles, and significant development in the field of cinema. FTVP 1000 Introduction to Film, Television, and Video Production (3) (LEID) This course will introduce basic concepts of production with cameras and editing equipment. Intended mostly for non-majors or new majors who are unsure about the field. This class will introduce the foundations of production with video cameras, including basic documentary and narrative production. Areas of study will include camera basics, 3-point lighting, audio for video, editing and online delivery. FTVP 1200 Camera and Light (3) (LEID) Cameras and lights are the primary artistic tools of the filmmaker and as such Camera and Light will focus heavily on the aesthetics of cameras and lighting in both documentary and narrative style environments. Areas of study will include: film language, film and television production roles, video formats, acquisition styles, lens basics, composition and framing, light, shadow, color and form.

ETHC 1000 Issues and Problems in Ethics (1) (GVA) This is a one-credit-hour course in applied/practical ethics, designed to explore the moral issues and/ or dilemmas pertinent to a specific discipline, profession, or topic. The course is designed to increase student awareness of ethical issues and to develop critical thinking skills. May be repeated two times for a total of 3 credit hours. GCP Coding: (ETH) FREN 1090 Elementary French: Level I (1-4) (GVA) Teaches listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing, with emphasis on understanding and speaking. The goal is fluency in the basic French needed for everyday situations and the recognition of challenges in intercultural communication. May be repeated once for credit with permission of the department chair. GCP Coding: (GLBL) (INTC) FREN 1100 Elementary French: Level II (1-4) (GVA) A continuation of FREN 1090. Teaches listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing, with the emphasis on understanding and speaking. The goal is fluency in the basic French needed for in everyday situations and an understanding of the origin of specific cultural differences. May be repeated once for credit with permission of the department chair. Prerequisite: FREN 1090 or equivalent. GCP Coding: (GLBL) (INTC) FREN 2090 Intermediate French: Level I (1-4) (GVA) Teaches listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing, with the emphasis on understanding and speaking. Proceeds from the concrete basic language of everyday situations to expressions of ideas and opinions, with the goal of achieving intermediate low-level fluency and basic intercultural competence. May be repeated once for credit with permission of the department chair. Prerequisite: FREN 1100 or equivalent. FREN 2100 Intermediate French: Level II (1-4) (GVA) This is a review of the basic grammatical structures of French, as well as a development of vocabulary and of written and oral fluency. The goal is intermediate mid-level fluency and basic intercultural competence. May be repeated once for credit with permission of the department chair. Prerequisite: FREN 2090 or equivalent. FREN 3090 Advanced French: Level I (1-3) (GVA) Develops advanced-level writing skills and presents different forms of writing through frequent practice. Also

provides a review of French grammar and introduces some advanced grammatical concepts. May be repeated once for credit if content differs or with permission of the department chair. Prerequisite: FREN 2100 or equivalent. FINC 3210 Principles of Finance (3) (GVA, GHA, LEID, VIE) Introductory course integrating concepts of corporate finance with investments and the money/capital markets. Topics include the role of money in the economy; the time value of money; financial analysis and planning; security valuation and capital market theory; capital budgeting; short- and long- term financing; and working capital management. Value maximization and risk/return tradeoffs in financial decision making are employed as integrative concepts throughout the course. Prerequisites: BUSN 2750, ACCT 2010 and ACCT 2025. FINC 3600 Financial Management (3) (GHA) This course is a continuation and extension of the Principles of Finance course. The fundamental financial and operating decisions made by a firm are explored. Major topics include capital budgeting, cost of funds, capital structure analysis, and dividend policy. A combination of problem-solving and case-study methodologies is used. Prerequisite: FINC 3210. FINC 3800 Financial Markets and Institutions (3) (GHA) Students develop a unified framework for understanding financial intermediaries and markets. They examine the structure, regulation, and operation of banking and non- banking financial institutions; analyze how central bank operations affect financial institutions; and develop an understanding of money and capital markets, the flow of funds through the economy, and the role of financial markets. Prerequisite: FINC 3210. FINC 4210 Investments (3) (GHA) Introduces information about investing in securities, commodities, and options; and methods and techniques for analyzing investment opportunities and assessing financial conditions for investment purposes. Prerequisites: ACCT 2010, ACCT 2025 and FINC 3210. FINC 4220 Financial Statement Analysis (3) (GHA) Financial report analysis, interpretation, and evaluation from the viewpoints of creditors, owners, and others concerned with business strengths and weaknesses and future outlooks of business organizations. Prerequisite: FINC 3210.

be repeated for credit with permission of the instructor. GCP Coding: (ARTS) (WCOM)

FTVP 3000 StoryLab (3) (LEID) The Webster University Storylab is a unique opportunity for School of Communications students from every discipline to come together and work on storytelling projects, both of their own design as well as helping others realize their vision. Students can use this course to develop professional examples of work, do storytelling projects like films, podcasts, YouTube shows, advertising campaigns, investigative journalism, scripts, concept development for television shows, documentary photography and video, radio shows, and anything else you can imagine. Students will develop and pitch ideas, and work together across disciplines to complete projects from ideation though development and into production and implementation. Storylab functions like an actual laboratory environment where the telling of compelling stories is the whole focus. May be repeated for credit as content differs. Prerequisites: FTVP 1100, FTVP 1200, FTVP 1300 and sophomore or higher status. Students learn the potential of film and video as a fine art medium. Projects are screened and discussed in class, and students are trained in advanced techniques to enable them to produce individual works to be screened in a group show at the end of the semester. Prerequisites: FTVP 1100, FTVP 1200, and FTVP 1300 or permission of the instructor. FTVP 3100 Experimental Film and Video (3) (LEID) FTVP 3110 Documentary Production (3) (LEID) This class will focus on one of the most challenging forms of storytelling: the documentary. The documentary producer is often a one-person team responsible for navigating the legality, setting up the shoots, doing the shooting and lighting, wrangling the footage, and determining the story of the documentary project. Using historical examples from around the world, we will look at trends and examples of good documentary work, and students will produce, direct, and shoot their own short documentary projects. Prerequisites: FTVP 1100, FTVP 1200 and FTVP 1300. FTVP 3150 Topics in Film, Television or Video Production (3) (GVA) These courses are offered periodically to feature topics in film, television or video production not covered by regularly offered courses. May be repeated for credit if content differs. Prerequisites: Vary with topic. GRMN 1090 Elementary German: Level I (1-4) (VIE) Teaches listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing with

the emphasis on understanding and speaking. The goal is fluency in the basic German needed for everyday situations and the recognition of challenges in intercultural communication. May be repeated once for credit with permission of the department chair. GCP Coding: (GLBL) (INTC) GRMN 1100 Elementary German: Level II (1-4) (VIE) A continuation of GRMN 1090. Teaches listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing, with emphasis on understanding and speaking. The goal is fluency in the basic German needed for expression in everyday situations and in understanding of the origin of specific cultural differences. May be repeated once for credit with permission of the department chair. Prerequisite: GRMN 1090 or equivalent. GCP Coding: (GLBL) (INTC) Teaches listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing, with emphasis on understanding and speaking. Proceeds from the basic language of everyday situations to expressions of ideas and opinions, with the goal of achieving intermediate low-level fluency and basic intercultural competence. May be repeated once for credit with permission of the department chair. Prerequisite: GRMN 1100 or equivalent. GRMN 2090 Intermediate German: Level I (1-4) (VIE) GRMN 2100 Intermediate German: Level II (1-4) (VIE) This course is a continuation of GRMN 2090. It consolidates grammar, vocabulary building, and development of conversational skill with group discussions, covering practical and cultural aspects of the language. May be repeated once for credit with permission of the department chair. Prerequisite: GRMN 2090 or equivalent. GRMN 3090 Advanced German: Level I (1-3) (VIE) Provides a review of German linguistic structures. The goal is to strengthen previous language knowledge and to lead students to advanced levels of proficiency in spoken and written German. May be repeated once for credit if content differs or with permission of the department chair. Prerequisite: GRMN 2100 or equivalent. GRMN 3100 Advanced German: Level II (1-3) (VIE) A continuation of GRMN 3090. May be repeated once for credit if content differs or with permission of the department chair. Prerequisite: GRMN 2100 or 2170 or equivalent.

ECON 3020 Intermediate Microeconomics (3) (GHA, VIE)

fantasy, modern fantasy, historical fiction, contemporary realistic fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and graphic novels. These readings will support students’ understanding of the impact of historical, gender, socio-economic, and cultural status on the adolescent journey. GCP Coding: (SSHB) (INTC) ENGL 1030 Introduction to Literature (3) (VIE) Designed to accommodate non- majors. Introduces the perceptive analysis of literature with an emphasis on enhancing the appreciation and enjoyment of literature in ways that extend beyond academic study. Studies a range of literature including such genres as poetry, fiction and drama. GCP Coding: (ROC) (WCOM) ENGL 1044 Topics in Literature (1-3) (ATH, GHA, VIE) Designed to accommodate non-majors. Exposes students to a broad range of literary texts organized around a central topic, theme or genre. Topics may include: best sellers, science fiction and mystery. May be repeated for credit if content differs. Up to 3 credits may count for English majors (as ENGL elective). GCP Coding: (ROC) (WCOM) ENGL 2030 British Literature II (3) (ATH) Studies British literature from 1660 to 1901, with emphasis on literary analysis tools including close reading, argumentation, historical/social contexts. Offered for 16 weeks only. GCP Coding: (ROC) (WCOM) Studies significant works by important British novelists of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries with an emphasis on the continuity of British literature and its relationship to the historical moment. GCP Coding: (ROC) (WCOM) ENGL 2035 History of the Novel (3) (VIE) ENGL 2050 U.S. Literature (3) (ATH) Studies the diverse traditions of American literature, from the oral stories of native cultures and accounts of European contact to the early 20th century realists, raising issues of what America means and who counts as an American that we’re still dealing with today. In addition to exploring the influence of race, gender, religion and region on the creation and reception of literary texts, the course will emphasize literary analysis tools including close reading, argumentation and historical/ social contexts. Required of majors. Offered for 16 weeks only. GCP Coding: (ROC) (WCOM) ENGL 2160 Creative Writing: Fiction (3) (THAI, VIE) Writing in various forms of fiction. Some work on an individual basis through conferences with the instructor. May

WEBSTER.EDU/STUDYABROAD -42- through reading texts written for and about young adults. These multi-ethnic and international texts represent the genres and formats of traditional EDUC 3190 Young Adult Literature (3) (GVA) Students will explore the transitional aspects of adolescence (physical, cognitive, social, and emotional) V.E.R.’s) of international trade and consider trade integration. Course content also focuses on the foreign exchange market and balance of payments in international trade. Macropolicies in open economies, such as flexible exchange rates and the nature of world money, are examined. Theories and policies of foreign direct investment are considered. Prerequisite: ECON 2000. This course covers advanced theory and applications in microeconomics. Topics include utility theory, consumer and firm choice, optimization, goods and services markets, resource markets, strategic behavior, and market equilibrium. Prerequisite: ECON 2000. ECON 3030 Intermediate Macroeconomics (3) (GVA, VIE) This course covers advanced theory and applications in macroeconomics. Topics include growth, determination of income, employment and output, aggregate demand and supply, the business cycle, monetary and fiscal policies, and international macroeconomic modeling. Prerequisite: ECON 2000. ECON 3100 Issues in Economics (3) (GVA, VIE) Analyzes current economic issues in terms of historical background, present status, and possible solutions. May be repeated for credit if content differs. Prerequisite: ECON 2000. ECON 3200 Money and Banking (3) (VIE) Studies the forms and functions of money, the commercial banks, the Federal Reserve system, and monetary theory and policy used as a tool to achieve economic goals. Includes banking and other financial institutions. Prerequisite: ECON 2000. ECON 3700 Economics of Development (3) (VIE) An analysis of issues and problems pertaining to natural resources management, manpower, capital accumulation, technological progress, and sociocultural-institutional factors. Prerequisite: ECON 2000. ECON 3720 International Trade and Finance (3) (LEID, THAI, VIE) Students examine the theories, policies, and instruments (e.g., tariffs, quotas,

ENGL 2180 Creative Writing: Nonfiction (3) (GHA)

A writing course for students interested in the essay form. Studies a wide variety of contemporary essays as models for student writing, focusing on voice, form, and audience. May be repeated for credit with permission of the instructor. GCP Coding: (ARTS) (WCOM) ENGL 2210 Adaptations (3) (THAI) Concentrates on various adaptations of literary texts: from text to film; from one genre to another (prose narrative to play, novel to graphic novel, etc.); modernized versions of older works and other rewritings from new perspectives. Focus will be on both the texts and the art and challenges of adaptation. GCP Coding: (ARTS) (WCOM) ENGL 2300 Worlds of Romance (3) (THAI) Explores romance texts from the Middle Ages to the twentieth century. Examines the distinctive features of the romance genre and includes medieval romances, gothic novels, and science fiction film. Offered for 16 weeks only. GCP Coding: (ROC) (WCOM) ENGL 3130 Contemporary Drama (3) (ATH) Studies selected themes, genres, and playwrights, from Brecht to the present. Prerequisite: 6 credit hours of English or permission of the instructor. ENGL 4500 Literary Criticism (3) (ATH) Emphasizes the continuity of questions and answers in the history of literary criticism and examines the relationship of the kinds of emphasis put on literary values to social, political, and economic concerns. Readings range from Plato to deconstruction, but the approach of the course is toward the problems of criticism, not toward the mastery of texts as ends in themselves. Offered for 16 weeks only. Prerequisites: Junior standing; 12 credit hours of English, or permission of the instructor. EPMD 1000 Introduction to Media Production (3) (LEID, VIE) Beginning students of all communications disciplines learn a certain level of media production literacy. EPMD 1000 incorporates a combination of applied media aesthetics, theory and hands-on production experience in photography, filmmaking, audio and video production. As a core class, EPMD 1000 is preparation for subsequent theory and production courses in the School of Communications. GCP Coding: (ARTS) (OCOM)

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