Campus Commons PT - August 2019

FEWER SORE-NECKED MORNINGS 3 WAYS TO PREVENT NECK PAIN

CHANGE YOUR WORK SPACE Many people work at a desk where their computer is lower than eye level. Raising your workspace to meet you, or even just lowering your chair can make a world of difference in preventing neck pain. It will help you evenly distribute the weight of your head on your spine. PREPARE YOUR BACKUP The neck isn’t solely responsible for causing or preventing neck pain. The weight of your head leads your entire spine, and any support to the lower back can relieve pressure on your neck. Make sure your back is flush against the back of your chair and you’re sitting at a 100–110 degree angle to best support your lower spine. These are just a few tactics in the larger battle against chronic neck pain, but by practicing these habits, you’re promising yourself fewer mornings with a sore neck and better days as a result.

Waking up with neck pain is never a good way to start the day. It may seem like something out of your control, but the truth is the pain is probably not just from sleeping in a weird position. Neck pain can be the result of years of stress and poor posture, and, while neck pain can seem daunting to address, there are a few simple changes you can make to your posture that can lead to less soreness and fewer mornings with a sore neck. Your head weighs a lot, between 10–12 pounds. The best way to keep this weight from straining your neck is to keep your head right above the spine. When we look at our phones, at a computer screen, or even just lean in to talk to someone, we disrupt that even distribution of weight and cause unnecessary pain and strain. Try to keep your gaze forward and the weight of your head evenly distributed. EQUALLY DISTRIBUTE THE WEIGHT OF YOUR HEAD

TAKE A BREAK

SUMMERTIME GAZPACHO

Inspired by CookieAndKate.com

INGREDIENTS

2 1/2 lbs ripe tomatoes; cored, seeded, and cut into 1-inch chunks 1 small cucumber; peeled, seeded, and cut into 1-inch chunks 1 red bell pepper; cored, seeded, and sliced into ribbons 1 small Vidalia onion, peeled and cubed

• • • • •

1/4 cup basil leaves 1 clove garlic, peeled

1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

2 tbsp sherry vinegar

Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

DIRECTIONS

1. Place a blender and medium mixing bowl on your workstation. 2. Divide the tomato chunks, cucumber pieces, and bell pepper slices evenly between blender and bowl. Place entire onion in blender. 3. Add basil, garlic, olive oil, vinegar, salt, and pepper to blender. Blend on low, gradually raising speed to high until smooth, about 2 minutes. 4. Add blender contents to bowl and mix until just broken up, about 10–20 seconds. 5. Let mixture sit in fridge for a minimum of 2 hours. Transfer to bowls and serve.

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