Biola_Catalog_19650101NA

1965-1966

"Forever, 0 Lord, thy word is settled in heaven"

CATALOG OF

BIOLA COLLEGE

1965 - 1966

THE BIBLE I NSTITUTE oF Los ANGELES, INC. 13800 Biola Avenue. La Mirada, California

CALENDAR FOR 1965

CALENDAR FOR 1966

MARCH

FEBRUARY

JANUARY

JANUARY

FEBRUARY

MARCH

S M T W T F S

SMTWTFS

SMTWTFS 1 2 3 4 5 6

SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS . . . . . . . . . . .. 1 .... 1 2 3 4 5 . . .. 1 2 3 4 5 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 27 28 . . . . . . . . . . 27 28 29 30 31 .. . . 30 31 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ..

... 1 2 .. 1 2 3 4 5 6

.... .

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 21 22 23 24 25 26 27

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 28. . . . .

28 29 30 31 . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . .

31 . .

. . . . ..

. ..

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

S M T W T F S . . . . .... 1 2 3

S M T W T F S

SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS . . . . . . .... 1 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 .... .. 1 2 3 4 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 29 30 31 26 27 28 29 30 . . . .

SMTWTFS

. . . . . . . . .... 1 . . . 1 2 3 4 5

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 25 26 27 28 29 30. 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 27 28 29 30 . . . . . .

30 31 . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . .

SEPTEMBER

SEPTEMBER

JULY

AUGUST

JULY

AUGUST

SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 .. 1 2 3 4 5 6 . .. . . . .. 1 2 3 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 28 29 30 31 .. .. . . 25 26 27 28 29 30 . . 31 . . . . .... . . .. . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

S M T W T

F S

SMTWTFS SMTWTFS

. . . . . 1 2 3 4

. . . . . . .. 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

26 27 28 29 30 . . . .

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 29 30 31 . . . .

. . . . . . . . . .

. .. . . . . . ' . . OCTOBER

OCTOBER

NOVEMBER

DECEMBER

NOVEMBER

DECEMBER

SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS . . . . . . . ... .. 1 . . .. 1 2 3 4 5 . . .. .... 1 2 3 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 27 28 29 30 .. . . . . 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 30 31 . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SMTWTFS

SMTWTFS

SMTWTFS

. . . . . . . . . 1 2 .. 1 2 3 4 5 6 . . . . . . 3 4 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 5 6 7 8 9 1011 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 12 13 14 1516 1718 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 19 20 21 22123 2425 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 28 29 30 . . . . . . . . 26 27 28 2930 31 .. 31 . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . .I. . 1 12

COLLEGE CALENDAR

FALL SEMESTER 1965

September 7 - 10 September 10, 11

Orientation Registration Convocation Classes begin Final day of registration and program change Thanksgiving recess Christmas recess Final examinations Torrey Memorial Bible Conference

September 12 September 13 September 24

November 25 , 26 December 5 - January 2 January 25 - 28 January 30 - February 6

SPRING SEMESTER 1966

January 31 - February 4 February 4, 5

Orientation Registration Convocation and classes begin Final day of registration and program change Missionary Conference Easter recess Senior examinations Alumni Day Class Day Commencement Final Examinations

February 7 February 18

March 6 - 13 April 3 - 10 May 30 - June 1

June 3 June 4 June 5 June 6 - 10

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Directions for Correspondence ---------------------------------------------- Inside front cover School calendar ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 3 Board of Trustees -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 5 College Administration and Staff -------- --- ----- ---- --------- -------------------------------------- 5 Facuity ------------------------------------------------- --- ------------------------------ --------------- ----------- 6 Faculty Committees -------- ------- ---------- -- ----------------------------------- -- ----------------- ---- ----- 11 General Information --------------------------------------------------- ----------------------------------- -- 12 Historical sketch ---------------- ----- ---- ------------------------- --------------------- --------------- 12 Statement of Doctrine ------- --- ----- --------------------------------- ----- ------------ ------------- 14 0 b j ectives ---------------------------- ------------------- ------------------------------------------------- 15 Book store ------ ------------------------------- ------------- -------- ------------------------------------ -- 16 Library --------------------------------------------- -- --------------------- ---------------------------------- 16 Academic Information ------------------------------------------------------------- ----------- -- ---- ------ 18 Admission ------------- ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 18 Registration --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 19 Graduation requirements ---------------------- ---- ----------- ----------------------------------- 20 Student guidance service ------- --------- ---------------------- ---- ----------------------------- 21 Grades --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 22 Financial Information ----------- --------- ------ ----- ------ ------------------ ----------------------------- 24 Student employment ------------- -- ------------------ ------------ ---------------------------------- 25 Scholarships -------------------- ------------------------ ------------ ------------- ------- --- --------------- 26 Student Activities -- -------------------------------------------- --------------- ---- --- ------- ----------------- 28 Associated Student Body ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 28 Student organizations ------------------------------------------ ------------------- ----------------- 29 Residence requirements ------------------------------------- ---- --------- ------------------------ 30 Student health service --- ------------- ------------ -------- -- ----------- ----- ------------------------ 30 Discipline --------------------------------- -- ---------------- ----------------------------------------------- 31 Description of Courses ---- ---------------------------------------- --------------------------------------- 32 Index -- ----------- --- ----- ------------- ------ --- ---- ----- ------------------ ---- -------------------------------- ------ 82

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THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Officers of the Board

LOUIS T. TALBOT .... ..... .. ........ ..... ............. ... ..... ... ........................ Chancellor SAMUEL H. SUTHERLAND ........................ .. .............................. President RAY MYERS .... .......... ..................... ........ ................. Chairman of the Board PAUL SCHWEPKER .... ........................ .. ............. Secretary of the Board

Memhers of the Board

LLOYD T. ANDERSON ROGER ARNEBERGH FOSTER BENS, D.D.S. NELSONS . DILWORTH JACOB C. EYMANN

KERMIT OESTREICH, Tucson

GEORGE PEEK

JAMES POLLIE, Phoenix

DANIEL ROSE

SAMUEL H. SUTHERLAND

A. CLIFTON HANNA, D.D.S. CHARLESKOHLENBERGER

LOUIS T . TALBOT

WALTER WARKENTIN

SYLVESTER MARSHBURN ROBERT E. WELCH MARVIN McCARTHY , Phoenix CLARENCE WHEELER, Phoenix RAY MYERS DONALD ZAHN, Phoenix

Administration

LOUIS T. TALBOT , LL.D . .. ................................. .. ............. ..... Chancellor SAMUEL H. SUTHERLAND, LL.D ......................... .. .............. President JAMES R. ALLDER .. .. ........ Vice -President in charge of Investments AL SANDERS ............ .. .. Vice-President in charge of Public Relations JAMES H. CHRISTIAN, B.A. , Th.D ... .. ................ Dean of the College WILLIAM G. SIEMENS, M.A.... ................................. Dean of Students MARGARET HART , B.A. , M.R.E ... ...... Associate Dean of Students BARBARA BARKE .......................... .. .. .... .. ..... .. ......................... .. .... .. Registrar ARNOLD D. EHLERT, M.S.L.S., Th.D ... .. .... .. ...... ... .. .......... . Librarian PAUL W. SCHWEPKER .... .. ........ .. .............. .. .............. .. .... ....... ..... Controller SPURGEON E. ELDER ................ .. ............... .. ......... Director ofPersonnel DORIS WETZLER ............ .. ........................... .. ..... Administrative Assistant KENNETH B. DANIELS , Th .M......... Director of Chri stian Service GEORGE FRALICK, M.D................................... .. .... College Physician

5

FACULTY

SAMUEL H. SUTHERLAND, Th .B. , D.D ., LL.D .... . President, 1936 B.A. , Occidental College: Th .B., Princeton Theological Semin­ ary ; D.D., The Bible Institute of Los Angeles ; LL.D ., John Brown University JAMES H. CHRISTIAN, Th .D. .......... .. ....... . Dean of the College, 1951 B.A., Westmont College; Th.B . , The Bible Institute of Los Ange­ les; B.D., Th.M., Th.D ., Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary BARBARA BARKE , B.A. ... ...... .. ... .... ........ ... ..... ...... .... Registrar , 1959 B.A. , Biola College WILLIAM BASS , Ph .D. ... .... .. .. .. Professo r of Philos ophy , 1960 B.A. , Pepperdine College ; B.D. , Fuller Theological Seminary; M.A. , Ph .D., University of Southern California DAVID BICKER , M.A ... ... ..... .. Ass is tant Profes sor of Sp eech, 1962 B.A. , Fort Wayne Bible College College ; B.D . , Conservative Baptist Theological Seminary; M.A. , Denver University ; Gradu­ ate Study , U.C .L.A . RAYNER BROWN, M.M. ... ..... ....... ......... .... Prof es so r of Mu s ic, 1953 B .M ., M .M ., University of Southern California BILL VAN BYNUM, D.R. E . .. .. .. .. ....... .. ......... .... .. .... ... .. . B .A., Fort Wayne Bible College ; B.D . , Conservative Baptist Theological Seminary; M.A., Denver University; Graduate Study. U.C.L.A. REINHARD J . BUSS , M.A... .. Ass is tant Prof e s s or of Ge rman, 1964 B.A ., University of Maryland ; M.A. , U.C.L .A. RICHARD CHASE , Ph.D . .. ... ... Assoc iate Profes sor ofSpeech, 1953 Th .B., Los Angeles Bible Theological Seminary; B.A . , M.A . , Pepperdine College ; Ph .D. , Cornell University SHERWOOD COLE , Ph .D. A ssoc iate Prof esso r of Psychology, 1961 B .A ., University of California, Santa Barbara ; M.A ., University of California at Los Angeles ; Ph .D., Claremont Graduate School and University Center THEODORE K. COMDEN, M.A ... ...... . ... .... .. .... .. .. .. ...... . Assistant Professo r of Physical Education, 1964 B .A. , Greenville College ; M.A. . University of Maryland KENNETH B. DANIELS , Th .M. ... .... ..... ... . .. .... ... ..... .. .. ... ..... .... . .. ........ .... ... .. .. Di rec tor of Chris tian Se rv ice Departm ent, 1953 Diploma , The Bible Institute of Los Angeles~B.A.. Linfield Col­ lege ; Th .M., Dallas Theological Seminary BOLTON DAVIDHEISER , Ph.D . ............ .... P rofessor of Sc ience, 1957 B.A., Swarthmore College ; Ph.D ., John Hopkin s University VIRGINIA DOLAND , M. A. .... .... Ass i s tant P rof esso r of Eng lis h, 1963 B.S. , Bob Jones Universi ty; M.A. , Los Angeles State College; Graduate Study , University of Southern California HAROLD L.DUNNING .. .. ..... .. .. Direc tor of Miss ion s Ac tivitie s Diploma , Moody Bible Institute ; G.Th . , Grace Theological Sem­ inary WILLIAM EBELING , Th .M. Assoc iate Prof esso r of Doc trin e, 1953 B.A. , Wheaton College; Th. B. . Th .M. . Dallas Theological Sem­ inary

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FACULTY *ARNOLD D. EHLERT , Th.D . ... ......... . .. ... ... .... ..... ....... ... .. ............ ............... ..... . Librarian and Professor of Library Science, 1955 B.A., John Fletcher College; Th.M. , Th.D. , Dallas Theological Seminary; M.S.L.S., University of Southern California WALLACE EMERSON, Ph.D ........ ..... Professorof Psychology, 1948 B.A., Huron College; M.A., Stanford University; Ph .D., Univer­ sity of Southern California SYLVIA GILMAN, M.A ..... .... Assistant Professor of English , 1961 B.A. , M.A., Colorado State College GERALD L . GOODEN , B.A. (in L.S.) .... Reference Librarian, 1962 B .A., Marshall University; Graduate Study , U.C.L.A. LESLIE STEPHEN GRAHAM, M.A.. .. ... .. ... .. ....... .... .. .... .. ...... ............ .......... . Assistant Professo r of Physical Science, 1959 B.A. , Pasadena College; B.D., Talbot Theological Seminary; M.A., Long Beach State College; Graduate Study, University of California at Riverside DAVID HAMMOND , M.A .... . AssistantProfessorof Education, 1962 B.S., Bob Jones University ; M.A. , Arizona State University; Graduate Study, University of Southern California MARGARET HART , M.R.E ... .. .. .. Associate Dean of Students, 1959 B.A . , University of California at Los Angeles; M.R.E ., Fuller Theological Seminary JAMES 0. HENRY , Ph.D. .... ..... Professor of History , 1953 Th.B ., The Bible Institute of Los Angeles; B.A. , M.A., Univer­ sity of Southern California ; Ph.D ., University of Maryland EDWIN HEPPNER , M.M .... .... . Assistant Professor of Music, 1962 B.M., Northwestern College ; M.M ., University of Oregon; Grad­ uate Study, University of Southern California PHYLLIS I. HOLMES ........ Instructor in Physical Education, 1964 B.S. , Greenville College; Graduate Study. UniversityofSouthern California MARTHA S. HOOKER , B.A. ........ ................. .................. ..... . ..... .. ........ .. Assistant Professor of Christian Educat ion , 1926 BOBBY R. HOPKINS , M.A. .... .......... ....... ...... ... .......... . Ass is tant Professor of Mathema ti cs, 1963 B. A., Pasadena College ; M.A. , University of Southern California MASAKAZU IWATA, Ph.D . .... AssistantProfesso r of Hi s tory. 1961 B.A. , M.A., Ph .D. , University of California at Los Angeles RICHARD JONES , Ed.D ..... AssociateProfesso rof Educat ion , 1963 B.A. , Wheaton College ; B.D .. Fuller Theo logical Seminary; M.A ., Los Angeles State College; Ed.D . , University of California at Los Angeles ALEX A. KADERS, M.A. Assistant Professor of Psycho logy , 1965 Th.B. , The Bible Institute of Los Angeles: B.A . . Biola College, Chapman College ; M.A. . Long Beach State College SUN KEE KIM , M.A........... .. AssistantProfesso r of Economics, 1965 B.S ., Seoul National University; M.A .. University of Missmiri: Ph.D. candidate. University of Southern California DOROTHY KINDELL , M.R.E . .... Assistant Professor of Art, 1956 A.A. , Col orado Woman ' s College: Art Certificate. Colorado State Teachers College : Chappell Art School: Th.B .. M.R.E .. Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary *On leave 1965 - 1966 7

FACULTY NICKOLAS KURTANECK , Th.D . Ass is tantProfes sorof Bibl e, 1959 B.A ., Grace College ; B.D., Th .M., Th .D. , Grace Theological Seminary MICAH W.M. LEO, Ph .D. As soc iate P rofesso r of Chemis try, 1965 B.S., National Taiwan University ; M.S. , University of Rhode Is­ land ; Ph .D. , Rutgers University WILLIAM R.LOCK , M.M. ...... .. Ass istant Prof esso r of Music , 1964 A.R.V.T ., Royal Conservatory of Music ; B.M ., M.M . , MacPhail College of Music ; Graduate Study , University of Southern Calif. ELIZABETH McCULLOUGH, M.S . ....... .. ..... ..... ..... .. .. ........ .... .. .. .. .. ... ... .. .... .. .. Assoc iat e P rofesso r of Educa tion, 1952 B.A ., University of California at Los Angeles ; B.Ch .Ed. , The Bible Institute of Los Angeles; M.S., Unive rsity of Southern California ; Graduate study , University of Southern California COLINS . McDOUGALL , B.S..... ... ... .... ...... ..... .............. ... .... .. ... .. ..... ..... ....... ... . In s truc to r in Phys ica l Education , 1964 B.S. , North Central College; Graduate Study , California State College at Los Angeles INEZ McGAHEY , M.A....... .. Associate Professor of English , 1948 Diploma , The Bible Institute of Los Angeles ; B.A. , Wheaton Col­ lege ; M.A. , Los Angeles State College ; Graduate study , Univer­ sity of California at Los Angeles "MARVIN McKISSICK , M.M. ... . Associate P rofes sor of Music , 1957 B.A ., Bob Jones University ; M. M. , University of Southern Calif­ ornia; Graduate study, Uni versity of Southern California RICHARD McNEELY , Th .D. .... Assoc iate P rofessor of Bibl e, 1960 B.A. , Westmont College ; Th .M., Th .D. , Dallas Theological Sem­ inary GEORGE M.NISHIDA , M.A. ....... ......... Inst ruc tor in Soc iology , 1964 B.A., Pasadena College ; M.A. , California State College at Los Angeles EDWARD NORMAN , M.A. ....... ... .. ...... .... ....... .. .......... .............. ............. ... .... ...... ... Athletic Director , A ss i s tant Prof es so r of Physical Education , 1962 B.S . , Springfield College; M.A., Ball State Teachers College; Graduate Study , University of Southern California ELIZABETH NORMAN , M.A. .. ........ ........ .... ...... ... ... .... ... ... Counse lor , 1962 B.S. , Taylor University; M.A., Ball State Teachers College PAUL POELSTRA, B.A. .... .. .. ....... .... ...... .. ... .. ... .. .... ... Dean of Men, 1963 B.A., Biola College ; Graduate Study, Claremont Graduate School and University Center HELMUTH C. POGGEMILLER , M.A. .. ...... ..... .... .. ............. .. ... .... ..... ..... .... .... . Assis tant Profes so r of Eng lish , 1964 B.A. , Tabor College , M.A. , Kansas State Teacher ' s College STELLA POHNG, M.A.L. S. .......... .. ...... .......... .... Catalog Libra rian , 1962 B.A ., National Taiwan Univers i ty; M. A. , George Peabody College CLARENCE ROSE , M.A......... ..... ... ... ..... Freshman Counselor, 1962 B.A . , Biola College ; M.A., San Francisco State College J .D. SARVER , M.A. ...... .. .. .......... .... .. ...... ... ....... ....... ... .. .... .. .... .... ........ .... ..... ........ ... Ass istant Professo r of Phys ica l Educat ion, 1964 B.A., Wheaton College ; M.A. , Long Beach State College

*On leave Fall 1965

3

FACULTY MARGARETSCHUMACHER, M.M. ... .. ... ...... ... .... .... ... .. .. ...... ...... .. ........ ......... . Ass istant Profes s or of Music , 1960 B.M., Wheaton College; M.M., American Conservatory of Music ANTONIA SERRANO, M.A. A ssoc iate Profe ssorof Language, 1953 B.A. , University of Madrid ; B.D., United Evangelical Seminary in Madrid ; Th .M. , Princeton Theological Seminary; M.A. , Uni­ versity of Barcelona WILLIAM SHANEBECK, M.A. Ass istantProfes sorof English, 1962 B.A. , Asbury College ; M.A. , University of Michigan WILLIAM SIEMENS , M.A. .. .. .... .... .... .. .. .. .. .. ... .. . Dean of Students, 1959 Th .B., The Bible Institute of Los Angeles ; B.A., Wheaton Col­ lege; M.A. , Pepperdine College ; Candidate , Ph .D., Claremont University College . LEONIE V. SOUBIROU , M.A . .. ... ...... .... .. .. . Prof es s or of Nursing, 1964 Diploma, The Bible Institute of Los Angeles ; R.N. , Emanuel Hospital ; B.A., Albany College ; P.H .N., University of Oregon Medical School ; M.A., New York University ; Graduate study, Biblical Seminary of New York ; Graduate study , University of California , Los Angeles KATHLEEN SPENCER , M.A . ............... .. .... .. .... .. .. ...... .............. .. .. ... .. .. .. .... .. .. .. .. Ass istant Professo r of Psychology, 1961 B.R.E. , London Bible Institute and Theological Seminary; M .A. , University of Michigan MILDRED SPINDLER , B.A. Ins tructor in Physical Education, 1963 B.A. , Wheaton College HARRY STURZ , Th .M............ .. .. . Ass is tant Professor of Greek, 1953 B.A. , Westmont College ; B.D., Th .M., Grace Theological Semi­ nary ; Graduate study, Grace Theological Seminary SAMUEL P . SUTHERLAND, B.A. .. .. .. .... ...... ....... .. .. .. ... .. .. .... .. ... .. .. ....... .......... .. Ass is tant Prof esso r of Psychology , 1964 B.A. , Biola College , Pasadena College; Graduate Study , Univer­ sity of Southern California RICHARD UNFRIED , M.M. .... Ass is tant Professo r of Music , 1960 B.M ., M.M. , University of Southern California ; Graduate study, University of Southern California FRANCES S. URTON, M.S. Assoc iate Profes sor of Science , 1964 B .S., M.S., University of Denver ; Graduate Study , University of Colorado EDWIN WEAVER , M.A . .... .. .. .. .. Ass is tant Prof essor of English , 1962 B.A. , Goshen College ; M.A ., Northwestern University DUANE WETZLER , M.A..... Ass is tantProfessorof Language, 1962 B.A. , University of California at Berkeley; M.A. , San Diego State College ; Graduate work at University of Slamanca, Tulane University A.K . WIENS , M.A... .. ... .... ... ...... .... Associate P rof esso r ofHisto ry, 1957 B.A., Fresno State College ; M.A ., University of Southern Calif­ ornia ; Graduate study, University of Southern California JENNIE WONG, L.T.S .C. .. .. Ass istant P rofesso r of Music, 1964 L .R.S.M., Royal Schools of Music ; F .T .C.L. , L.T .C.L. , Trinity College of Music ; L.T .S.C., Tonic Sol-Fa College of Music

9

FACULTY

PART-TIME FACULTY GERALD BRUCE, M.A........... .............................. ................ Mathematics B.A., Whittier College; M.A., University of Southern California HELEN L. CARRUTH, B.A....................... ........... .... .. ......... ................ Voice RICHARD DAY, B.A ........... ... .. .... ......................... Personal Evangelism B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University ELMA DOSS, B.M........................... ........ ... .. ...... .. ......... .......... .................. Music B.M., Chapman College RUSSELL GABLER, B.D ................. ... ... ..... ........... ...... .... Church Polity B.A., Wheaton College; B.D., Fuller Theological Seminary ROBERT HILL, B.D. .................. ............................. ....... .................. Missions B.A., Manchester College; B.D., Grace Theological Seminary; Equival ent to M.A., Indiana University GORDON HOOKER , D.S.M......................................... ... ... ... ............. .. Music D.S .M., The Bible Institute of Los Angeles PHILIP A. JOHNSON, M.A ......... .. ....................................... ... Mathematics B.A., Wheaton College ; M.A., Bowling Green State University DAVID LASSITER, B.M . ... ...... ........................... .............. ........... ..... Music Diploma, Moody Bible Institute; B.Sm ., Chapman College H.AMBROSE McMAHON, Th.B ....... .... ........ .... ......... ... ..... .... . Linguistics Th. B., The Bible Institute of Los Angeles LESTER REMSEN , D.M .A . .... .............. ......... ....... .. ..... ......... .............. Music B.M., Eastman School of Music; M.M., D.M.A. , University of Southern California. Formerly solo trumpet, U.S. Marine Band, Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra, and Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra HERBERT RICHARDSON, Th.D ......... .. .... ........................ .................. Bible B.D ., Th.D. , Los Angeles Baptist Theological Seminary MARGARET SCHAPER , M.A... ............. ......................... .. .. .. ...... ........... Music B.A., M.A., Bob Jones University; Graduate study, University of Southern California JACK SCHWARZ, M.M..... .. ........ .... ........ ............ ... .. ........... .. .. ........ ... .. ... .. Music B.M., Biola College; M.M. , University of Southern California; Graduate Study, University of Southern California C.DIANE SHANEBECK, B.A........ ........... ..... ........... ......... ...... .......... . Speech B.A., Asbury College; Graduate Study, California State College at Long Beach DAVID SHARGEL, B.A... .. ....... ... ........ .. .. ..... .. ....... Physical Education B.A., Biola College HOWARD L. WHITAKER, M.M.E ........................................... .... ... ... Music B.M.E., Wheaton College; M.M.E. , University of Colorado

10

FACULTY COMMITTEES

(President and Dean are ex officio members of all committees . Chairman is named first.) ACADEMIC POLICIES : Christian , Bass, Chase , Emerson, Henry, McCullough , Wiens ADMISSIONS: Siemens, Hart , Kurtaneck , Rose ATHLETICS : Ebeling , Graham, Hopkins , Norman , E. CAMPUS COMMITTEE ON TEACHER EDUCATION: McCullough , Barke , Bynum, Chase, Comden , Davidheiser , Henry, Heppner, Jones, McGahey , Wetzler CHAPEL : McNeely , Lock , Sturz CULTURAL ARTS : Heppner , Bass, Kindell CURRICULUM AND CATALOG : Christian , Barke , Bynum , Cole , Hammond , Iwata , Jones, Shanebeck , W., Urton LIBRARY : Gooden , Buss , Doland , Hammond , Iwata , Sarver , Suther­ land , Unfried SPIRITUAL LIFE : Daniels , Bicker , Gilman , Hart , Poggemiller , Schumacher , Serrano STUDENT PERSONNEL AND GUIDANCE : Siemens, Hart, McNeely, Norman , E ., Poelstra , Spencer , Spindler

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GENERAL INFORMATION HISTORICAL SKETCH

In 1906 "The Fisherman's Club," which combined Bible study and soul winning, was organized for the young men of the Immaruel Presbyterian Church by Rev. T. C. Horton, assistant pastor. The following year, Mr. D. H. Steele, an elder of the same church and manager of a department store, requested Mrs . Horton to open a Bible class for the young women employed in his store, offering a large room for the purpose. The group was named "The Lyceum Club" and grew to include other young women besides the employees of the one store. These two groups of young people p resented the challenge of further study and training. The Bible Institute idea was not entirely new; as earl y as 1901 Mr. Lyman Stewart, a Christian layman with a zeal for the Lord's service and an almost prophetic eye to the fuh1re, had planned for such a school in Los Ange les. Now, in response to an immediate need, Mr. Stewart and Mr. Horton became co-founders of the Bible Institute of Los Angeles. In the fall of 1907, through the cooperation of Rev. A. B. Pritchard, pastor of Central Presbyterian Church, some classes which were the forerunner of the Bibl e Institute, were held in the lecture room of that church. On February 25, 1908, a meeting was called to effect a permanent or­ ganization. At this meeting the following persons were elected as officers: Lyman Stewart, President; A. B. Pritchard, Vice-President; T. C. Horton, Superintendent; R. A. Hadden, Associate Superintendent; B. C. Atterbury, Secretary; and Leon V. Shaw, Treasurer. Messrs. Horton, Hadden, and Pritchard formed the faculty. There was rapid development of the school. From the beginning its out­ reach was evangelistic. Shop meetings were taken over and conducted. Bible Women's work was organized, a work among Jews was commenced, as was also Spanish Mission work and work among the men of the oil fields. Extension classes were organized in the city and in surrounding towns. Within three years the school had well outgrown the experimental stage, and a forward educational step was taken with the calling of Dr. Reuben A. Torrey to be Dean. On ·January 1, 1912, Dr. Torrey began his twelve-year period of service in this office. In order to meet the enlarging needs and to provide a suitable and per­ manent home for the school, a new site was purchased at Sixth and Hope Streets and a new building e rected, ground for which was broken on June 22, 1912. This building, dedicated the following year, reflected the builders' hopes and faith for future growth . Legally known as The Bible Institute of Los Angeles , Incorporated, this institution academically has taken four distinct forward steps in the field of Christian education. In 1936 the Institute appli ed for :md received State authorization for the conferring of certain degrees. Three four-year courses were then organized, leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Theology, Bachelor of Christian Edu­ cation, and Bachelor of Sacred Music .

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GENERAL INFORMATION

In 1945, in an effort to extend the missionary training program of the Bible Institute, the School of Missionary Medicine was brought into being. This postgraduate year is planned as supplementary training for missionary work and is open to graduates of any school who qualify in the spiritual, intellectual, and missionary requirements that are outlined. In the summer of 1949 another forward step was taken when, in response to repeatedly stated needs of mission boards and other Christian leaders, the school increased its Faculty and enlarged its curriculum to include a Bible College with courses leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree . This school is now known academically as Biola College. The most recent expansion occurred in 1952 when, to keep Christian education in step with world missionary and evangel istic demands, the Bible Institute of Los Angeles, Incorporated, inaugurated a standard three­ year Theological Seminary w ith courses leading to a Bachelor of Divinity degree. This school was named Talbot Seminary in honor of Dr. Louis T. Talbot, who held the office of President from 1938 to 1952 and who still serves the school in the capacity of Chancellor. To meet the demands imposed by the present student body and the en­ larged curr iculum a campus site of seventy acres was purchased in La Mirada, twenty-two miles east of Los Angeles civic center. From the small beginning of one course of study to four distinct but related schools on an enlarged campus, the story is one of steady growth and ex­ pansion. The present organization provides for a President over the whole, with .a Dean over each of the four schools, one of which, Biola College, presents this catalog. In February of 1961, Biola Coll ege reached another milestone in it's academic history when it became regionally accredited. THE COMMUNITY OF LA MIRADA The community of La Mirada is in Los Angeles County, twenty-two miles south-east of the city of Los Angeles. It lies near the center of Southern California's fastest growing area, surrounded by such cities as Whittier, Norwalk, Buena Park, Anaheim, and Fullerton . La Mirada is a planned residential community with a present population of approximately 25,000. Included within the community are two major shopping centers in addition to many other business establishments scattered throughout the area. Visible from La Mirada are such outstanding Southern California land­ marks as Mount Wilson, Mount Baldy, Signal Hill, Palos Verdes, and Santa Catalina Island. Famed Knott's Berry Farm is six miles away while equally famous Disneyland is approximately twelve miles to the southeast. Within an hour 's drive are such popular ocean resorts as Long Beach, Newport, Balboa, and Laguna Beach. While located sufficiently far from Los Ange les to escape its noise and congestion, La Mirada is close enough to enjoy the many cultural advan tages offered by a major metropolis. Points of historical interest in the form of some of California's most famous missions lie within an hour and a halfs drive. Recreational facilit ies lie close at hand. Within La Mirada will soon be created a public park comprising more than one hundred acres with hiking trails and picnic and play areas and an eighteen hole golf course. In winter,

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GENERAL INFORMATION an hour's drive will take one into the nearby mountains where winter sports are available.

THE BIOLA CAMPUS

The campus is bounded on the West by Biola Avenue and on the East by Luitwi e ler. It is located midway between th e large East-Wes t thorough­ fares of Rosecrans Avenue and Imperial Highway. Approximately three miles to the south is the Santa Ana Freeway . Students coming to the campus by automobile should fo ll ow these direc­ tions: coming from the West leave the Santa Ana Freeway at Ros ec rans and trave l east on th e street to Biola Avenue; coming from th e South-east leave the Santa Ana Freeway at Valley View and travel north on that stree t to Rose­ crans where you h1rn ri ght to Biola Avenue; coming from the East via San Bernardino Freeway (U .S. highways 60, 70, 99), turn south on Californ ia Highway 39 to Imperial Highway, and right on Impe rial to Biola Avenue. The campus, lying on gently rolling ground, is approximately seventy acres in extent. The buildings in use in clude the main c:lassroom and science buildings , the library , the auditorium, music building, th e commons, the infirmary, two women's residence halls, and accommodations for the men. Other buildings to be e rec ted at a late r time include th e administration build­ ing, the gymnasium, the student union building, th e main auditorium, and two me n 's residence halls . On the eas tern side of the campus I ie the athletic fields. One has an oval quarter mil e track with a 220-ya rd straightaway while the other the bas e ball diamond. Outdoor basketball, badminton, te nnis , and vo ll eyball courts are availab le for us e.

THE NATURE AND STANDARDS OF BIOLA COLLEGE

Biola College is an interdenomi nati onal school of college rank empha­ sizing thorough scholarship and is committed to th e evange li cal doctrines of the Christian C hurch. It earnestly endeavors to make th ese historic doc­ trines a vital reality in the spiritual I ife of this present ge neration. In view of th e fact that founders of Bi o la desired to serve th e Christian public, th e conduct of a Biola College student is expected to conform to the highest Christian standard. The rul e by which he lives is th e earnest striving for God's approval and the consc ious protection of hi s Christian testimony. Spec ifically, the re are certain practices wh ich are contrary to th e standards of Biola Coll ege and from which, therefore, all sh1de nts are to refrain as long as they are in school: the use of alcoholic beverages or tobacco, attend­ ance at commercial th eatre s, dancing, th e use of playing cards, and gamb ling in any form. Since th e College is interde nominational and yet th eologically conserva­ tive, th e A1ticles of Incorpora ti on con tain a doctrinal statement an abridge­ ment of which is given below: "The Bibl e, consisting of all th e books of th e Old and New T e stame nts, is the Word of God, a supernah1rally g iven reve lati on without e rror or mis-

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GENERAL INFORMATION

statement in moral and spiritual teachings and record of historical facts. "There is one God, eternally existing and manifesting Himself to us in three Persons - Father, Son, and Holy Ghost. "Our Lord Jesus Christ was supernaturally conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit, born of a virgin, lived and taught and wrought mighty works and wonders and signs exac tly as is reco rd ed in the four Gospels, was put to death by crucifixion under Pontius Pilate, was raised from the d ead in the body that had been nail ed to the cross, now sits at the Father's right hand from whence He is coming again personally, bodily, and visibly to this earth to inaugurate His millennial reign. In His pre-existent state He was with God, and of His own choice laid aside His divine glory and took upon Him­ self th e form of a servant and was made in the like ness of me n. He became in every respect a real man, possessed of all the essential characteristics of human nature. By His death upon the cross, the Lord Jesus Christ made a perfect atonement for sin, redeeming us from the curse of the law by becom­ ing a curse in our place. "The Holy Spirit is a Person, is God, and is possessed of all the distinct­ ively divine attributes; He indwe lls all believers, having baptized th em into the body of Christ at th e time of regeneration. "Man was created in the image of God, but the who le human race fell in the sin of the first Adam, and apart from Christ is sp irih1a ll y dead and lost. Men are justified on the simp le and single ground of the shed blood of Christ and upon the simple and single condition of faith in Him who shed the blood, and are born again by the Hol y Spirit, through the instrumentality of the Word of God. All those who rece ive Jesus Christ as their Saviour and the ir Lord, and who confess Him as such before their fe ll ow men become he irs of God and joint-heirs with Jesus Christ and at death th e ir spir its depart to be with Christ in conscious bles sedness, and at the second coming of Christ their bodi es shall be raised and transformed into th e likeness of the body of His glory. All thos e who persistently rej ect Jesus Christ in th e present life shall be raised from the dead and throughout e ternity ex ist in a state of conscious and endless torment. "The Church consists of all those who, in this prese nt dispensation , truly believe on Jesus Christ and is th e body and bride of Christ, which Christ loves and for which He has given Hims e lf. "There is a personal devil, a being of great cunning who can exert vast power on ly so far as God suffers him to do so, and who shall ultimate ly be cast into the lake of fire and brimstone. "

THE OBJECTIVES OF THE COLLEGE

Academic Objectives: The Coll e ge seeks to provide thorough training and sound scholarship in all of the areas of study which are provided in its curriculum. It further seeks to create in the students a thirst for knowledge and to teach effect ive methods of inves tigation whereby such knowledge may be obtained during the course of study and in the years following th e ir formal period of trainin g.

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GENERAL INFORMATION Civic Objectives:

The Coll ege holds to the conv icti on that the good Christian is likewis e a good citizen of the State. It teaches, both by precept and example, that good citizens respect autho rity and submit to the laws of the land. The Coll ege encourages the students to participate actively, while in college and throughou t li fe, in the development of the general welfare of their fellowmen, both in community and national life. It further seeks to instill a genuin e concern for the genera l welfare of mankind world around. Cultural Objectives: The College seeks to provide students with a whol esome cultural program which will inculcate an appreciation for the finer things of life as expressed in th e fine arts, literature, history, and th e civilizations of peoples and na­ tion s both past and present. Social Objectives: The College seeks to provide the students with a well -rounded social program that will develop personality and fit them in a normal and whole­ some manner to take their places in home, local ·church, and community. The program is further designed to develop and maintain high moral stand­ ards in the lives of the students, for their own benefit and in order that they might serve as wholesome examples and leaders wherever they may live and work. Spiritual Objectives: The College aims to send forth men and women who exp ress through their li ves a complete and valid commitment to the claims of Christ; a com­ prehensive knowledge of the Word of God, with ability to use it in all ·walks of life in leading men to Christ and, with wisdom, to teac h it to believers that they may grow in grace; and an enduement with power by the infil ling of the Holy Spirit, express ing itse lf in C!Histian love for all men and a d es ire for the ir salvation. Vocational Objectives: The Col lege seeks to provide thorough preparatory training in those areas of its curriculum in which students may desire to pursue graduate work lead ing to a profession. It seeks also to provide adequate term inal training in those areas of its curriculum which are designed to prepare students for their life work. BOOK STORE Biola College maintains a book store where text books, paper backs , school supplies, and other items rilay be purchased. THE LIBRARY The Biola Library is under a unified adm ini strat ion, and the main col­ lection serves all Biola schools. Departmental co ll ect ions are also maintained for The School of Missionary Medicine and Ta lbot Theological Sem inary. The School of Missionary Medicine collection is housed on th e ninth floor of Lyman Stewart Hall at .558 So. Hope Street in Los Angeles. The Seminary collec tion is housed in an alc:ove off the main reading room of the Rose

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GENERAL INFORMATION

Memorial Library on the La Mirada campus. Present holdings of the Biola Library include about 70,000 volumes and some 450 current periodicals with a total of 900 periodicals, including back runs. In auxiliary coll ections are to be found pamphlet files and a curriculum and unit collection for the Education and the Christian Education Departments. A number of special indexes provide access to volumes 1-50 of The King's Business magazine and to partial runs of other periodicals, to songs and hymns, sermons and sermon outlines, homil e ti c and poetic illustrations, and sim il ar materials. The main public catalog and other card files contain approximately 220,000 cards. Students also have access to the libraries of Long Beach, Long Beach State College, Whittier and Whittier College, all within a short distance of the library. The staff consists of three librarians, three full-time semi-profess ional assistants, and several part-time student assistants. The Library is an ideal workshop for students in Library Science, and it is the purpose of the staff to make it a model for study. Cataloging is being done according to the standards of the American Library Association and the Library of Congress. Standard equipment makes the library an attractive place to study and browse. AUDIO-VISUAL DEPARTMENT The College has an Aud io-Visual Director who handles the equipment and services of the program. The Library is responsible for purchases, cata­ loging, and circulation of materials. The coll ection of materials includes slides, filmstrips, flat pictures, flannelgraph materials, object lessons, globes, maps, phonograph records, tape recordings, etc. A few small slide and film­ strip projectors and a screen are available for circulation. Microfilm and microcard readers are available, and a photocopying machine has been in­ stalled.

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ACADEMIC INFORMATION ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS AND APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION

Each applicant for admission must secure from the Director of Admissions regular application forms. Application for admission should be made at the earliest date possible. No decision on the application should be expected until all of the application forms have been filed with the Director of Ad­ missions. All application papers should be on file by August 15 for the fall semester, and January 15 for the spring semester. These include: 1. The personal application form, including an identification picture and a two page autobiography. This should be accompanied by the $10.00 pre-registration deposit. The amount will be applied to the registration fee at the time of enrollment, or will be refunded if cancellation notice is given at least one month prior to the opening of the semester, or if the prospective student has been denied admission. 2. An official high school transcript. The applicant should request the high .school to send this directly to the Director of Admissions. 3. An official transcript from each school the applicant attended since high school. This includes those schools attended for even part of a semester. Each of these must be sent directly to the Director of Admissions from the previous school. 4. The three personal references; one from the applicant's pastor, one from a Christian friend, and one from a high school official or business friend. 5. The score on the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Ex­ amination Board must be submitted by the Educational Testing Serv­ ice. The Achievement Tests in English Composition and Intermediate Mathematics may be taken at the time of the SAT examination or may be taken on August 13 on the Biola Campus or during Orientation week. Transfer students must submit the scores of equivalent college aptitude tests previously taken or must take the above mentioned tests before being allowed to register. Students who are unable to take the College Board Examination may make arrangements with the Director of Admissions for an alternate test. 6. The health form, provided by Biola, properly and completely filled out by the applicant and the applicant's physician, and the medical consent form. FRESHMAN STANDING. An applicant for regular standing must be a graduate of an accredited high school and should have been a Christian for at least .one year. Applicants for regular standing should meet the following requirements: English . . .. .. . ........................... . .. . ... . 3 units Social Science .. . ........... . . . . . . . .... . .. . ...... 2 units Language (in one language) . ... . .... . ..... . . ..... 2 units Mathematics . ...... . ..... ... .. . ........ .. ...... 2 units Science ........................................ 1 unit Electives . .... . .. .. . . ... .. ........... ..... . .... 5 units Equivalent subjects may be accepted in lieu of specific requirements. A "C+" average is necessary in the specific requirements.

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ACADEMIC INFORMATION

Applicants who cannot meet the specific or equivalent prerequisite re­ quirements will be admitted to provisional standing until deficiencies have been removed. All deficiencies; which must be cleared by the beginning of the sophomore year, may be made up by taking college courses which cover the required material. Credits earned to cover a high school deficiency cannot be applied toward graduation from College. ADVANCED STANDING. Applicants for advanced standing must present the same application forms and transcripts as those applying for freshman standing. The transcript from the last school attended must bear the statement of honorable dismissal. Students transferring from accredited schools will receive credit for courses which are equivalent to Biola's requirements for graduation. Students transferring from non-accredited institutions may receive credit in Bible and related subjects by validation examinations or by satisfactory completion of twelve units of work taken during the first semester. Provisional credit for liberal arts units will be granted in accordance with policies of the state college or university of the state in which the institution is located from which credit is being transferred. A minimum grade average of "C" is required for admission with advanced standing. Students entering the College with advanced standing must meet the residence requirements for graduation: the Senior year of residence with at least twelve hours of classroom work per semester and, a minimum of 15 units of upper-division work in the major field, in the B.A. program. SPECIAL STANDING. Those who present reasons satisfactory to the Admissions Committee are privileged to take an elective course consisting of a minimum of five hours of class room work which includes at least one Bible subject. Unless sufficient reason is presented, a student is not allowed to remain in this classification for more than one year. REGISTRATION All students should register during scheduled registration days. Late registration will continue two weeks after the regular registration days. A late registration fee of $5.00 will be charged during the first week, and $10.00 during the second week. Registration is not complete until tuition and fees have been paid. Students will receive credit for only those courses in which they are officially enrolled in the Registrar's Office. CHANGE OF REGISTRATION A student who finds it necessary to drop or add a subject must secure from the Registrar's Office the proper form for such procedure. A student. who drops a course without fulfilling this requirement will receive an "F" in the subject. A charge of $1.00 is made for each class change. Changes in registration may be made during the two weeks of late regis­ tration. After that date courses cannot be added. Courses may be dropped without penalty during the first six weeks of class work provided that the student is doing work of a passing grade at the time of withdrawal. A grade of "F" is given for work below passing grade. Students who drop a course for reasons of health after the sixth week must secure from the Medical Department a statement of physical inability to carry the academic load.

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ACADEMIC INFORMATION

WITHDRAWAL A student who offic ially withdraws from college during a semester will rece ive a grade of "W" in al l courses in which the work is of passing grade at the time of withdrawal; otherwise, a grade of "WF" will be given. A student who withdraws may be granted honorable dismissal provided that he has met all of his financial obligations to the college, has secured from the Admissions Office and completed all forms for withdrawal, and is in good standing at the time. A sh1dent who withdraws unofficially, that is, has not completed the proper forms supplied by th e Admissions Office, will not receive a refund of any portion of his tuition or fe es , and will receive a grade of "WF" in each course. If he has no financial obligations to the college, a transcript of his work will be sent to another school upon request. GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS The Bachelor of Arts Degree. This degree is offered with majors in the following: Bible, Christian Education, Biological Science, English, His­ panic American Studies, History, Humanities, Language Arts, Music, Physi­ cal Education , Psychology, Social Science, and Speech. The first two named require 128 units and the others 150. The Bachelor of Music Degree. This degree is offered with majors in Applied Music and Church Music. Both of these majors require 128 units. The Bachelor of Science Degree. This degree is offered with a major in Nursing and Biological Science. All majors require a 2.5 grade average in the major field of study. Further information concerning each major will be found in the division by which it is offered. Included in all majors, except Bible, are 30 units of Bible and Doctrine according to the requirements of the Accrediting Association of Bible Col­ leges. In addition, 2 units of Church polity and 2 units of Personal Evangel­ ism are required. In the Bible major, 30 units of Bible and 10 units of Doctrine are required. Th e requirements in Bibl e and Doctrine common to all majors are as follows: Bibl e 101, 102, 103, 201, 202, 301, 302, 309, 310; Church Polity; Doctrine 302,402 The general Education requirements in all Bachelor of Arts programs except Christian Education are as follows: English ...... . .. ....... . . .. . ...................... 9 unit minimum English 101 and 102 Lower division lite rature elective Science and Math ematics . .. . ........... . .... . . . . . . 12 unit minimum Must include one semeste r of life science with lab Social Sci e nce . .. .. .......... . .. ..... ............ . . 11 unit minimum History 101 and 102; History 203; Political Science 201 Speech 101 ....................................... 3 unit minimum Philosophy 201 or 202 . . . .. . . . .... . ... . .... . ... .. ... 3 unit minimum Psychology 205 ................. . . .. ............. . . 3 unit minimum Fine Arts 101 ..... ...... ........................... 2 unit minimum Advanced or Intermediate Language ..... . .. ........ 6 unit minimum

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