Biola_Catalog_19570101NA

DIRECTIONS FOR CORRESPONDENCE

....................................... The President ...... .................. The Dean of Faculty 1'.:.................. / . . The jAdhaission bf&tdl ........ . The Bittiness Manager' _.A.............. . Thfe-DeanurEStudeiits/ ........................................The Registrar .............. The Employment Secretary ... The Director of Christian Service ........ The Director of Sacred Music .... The Director of Audio-visual and Film Production ........... The Alumni Office Secretary .......... ............. The Admissions Office The Director of the Summer Session

General College interests ...... Academic information ........... Admission of stujdents ......... .-. Business affairs 7 }..................J.„ Student affairs . / ...................... Transcripts of record, etc........ Student employment.............. Christian service activities Musical groups ........................ Audio-visual and film service Alumni affairs ......................... Veterans affairs....................... Summer session...................... .

Schools of The Bible Institute of Los Angeles, Incorporated: Biola College..... .................... .77.77....;.:. ............. ..: Dr. |ar^es’Tl- Christian, Dean Talbot Theological Seminar^: r7.............. Db, Charles L. Teinberg, Director Biola School of Missionary Medicine........Miss Leonie V. Soubirou, Director Bible Institute of Los Angeles ...........¡Dr. Chester J. Padgett, Director Biola Evening School ...¿.---A:............ST.'.S,?*__ Reyv Chase Sawtell, Director Correspondence School ......................................... Rev. Chase Sawtell, Director Auxiliary Departments: The Bible Women The Biola Broadcasts The Field Department The King’s Business Address all College mail to 558 South Hope Street, Los Angeles 17, California EDUCATIONAL STANDING Biola College is ^ member o| the Collegiate Division of the Accrediting Association of’Bible Institutés and Bible Colleges.* Biola is authorized to train students under the Veterans’ Bill of Rights. ‘ Listed in Accredited Higher Institutions , 1952, Office of Education, Wash­ ington, D.C., p. 68 .

“Forever, O Lord, th y word is settled in heaven”

C A T A L O G OF

BIOLA COLLEGE 1 9 5 7 - 1 9 5 8

T h e B ib l e I n s t it u t e of L os A ngeles , I n c . 558 South Hope Street, Los Angeles 17, California

1 9 5 8 JANUARY MAY SEPTEMBER SMTWTF S SMTWTF S SMTWTF S .......12 3 4 • 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9101 1213 14151617181926 21222324252627 282930- ——— FEBRUARY JUNE OCTOBER SMTWTF S SMTWTF S SMTWTF S 5 6 7 8 9 101 121314IS161718 19202122232425 262728293031- 4 5 6 7 8 910 11121314151617 18192021222324 25262728293031 MARCH JULY NOVEMBER SMTWTF S SMTWTF S SMTWTF S - - 1 2 3 4 5 3031 APRIL AUGUST DECEMBER SMTWTF S SMTWTF S SMTWTF S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9101 121314 15161718192021 22232425262728 2930............. 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 101112131415 16171819202122 232425262728- 5 6 7 8 9101 12131415161718 19202122232425 262728293031•• 6 7 8 9101 12 13141516171819 20212223242526 2728?93031—-i 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 101112131415 16171819202122 23242526272829 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 101 12131415 16171819202122 23242526272829

1 9 5 7 JANUARY MAY SEPTEMBER SMTWTF S SMTWTF S SMTWTF S - - 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 101 121314 15161718192021 22232425262728 2930............ FEBRUARY JUNE OCTOBER SMTWT F S SMTWTF S SMTWTF S -•• 1 2 3 4 5 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 91011121314IS 16171819202122 23242526272829 30 MARCH JULY NOVEMBER SMTWTF S SMTWTF S SMTWTF S 6 7 8 9101112 13141516171819 20212223242S26 2728293031—— .......12 3 4 S 6 7 8 9 1011 12131415161718 19202122232425 262728293031-- 6 7 8 9101 12 13141516171819 20212223242526 2728293031--- 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 101 1213141516 17181920212223 2425262728-- --

• 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9101 1213 14151617181920 21222324252627 28293031- - —

3 4 5 6 7 8 5 10T11213141516 17181920212223 24252627282930

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 101 121314IS16 17181920212223 24252627282930

31 APRIL AUGUST DECEMBER SMTWTF S SMTWTF S SMTWTF S

- 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9101 1213 14151617181920 21222324252627 28293031.......

.............1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10111213141516 17181920212223 24252627282930 31..........- -

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 91011121314 15161718192021 22232425262728 .~»3031..........

- - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9101 12 13141516171819 20212223242526 27282930.......

••1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10111213 14IS1617181920 21222324252627 282930..........

4 5 6 7 8 910 1 121314IS1617 18192021222324 25262728293031

FALL SEMESTER 1957 September 3, 1957 - January 10, 1958

September 3-6 September 3-4 September 5 September 18 November 28-29 December 14-January 1 January 7-10

Orientation for new students Registration Convocation: Classes begin Final day for registration and program changes Thanksgiving recess Christmas recess Final examinations

SPRING SEMESTER 1958 January 13 - June 3, 1958

January 13 January 13-14

Orientation for new students Registration Convocation: Classes begin Final day for registration and program changes Jubilee Bible Conference Easter recess Missionary Rally

January 15 January 28 February 23-March 2 March 29-April 6

April 13-20 May 22-27 May 28-June 3

Senior examinations Final examinations Senior Retreat Alumni Day Baccalaureate Sunday Class Day Commencement SUMMER SESSIONS First, June 16 - 27 Second, June 30 - July 18

May 29 May 30 June 1 June 2 June 3

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Directions for Correspondence ............................................... Inside front cover School calendar ...................................................................................................- 3 Board of Trustees ......................................................... -...................................... 3 College Administration and Staff ............................. -....................................... 5 Division Chairmen and Department Heads....................................................... 6 Faculty Committees................................................................................................. 6 Faculty ..................................................................................................................... 7 General Information ...........-...............................................................-...........— 10 Historical sketch .............................................................................................. 10 Statement of Doctrine ................................................................................... 12 Objectives .......................................................................................................... 13 Book store........ ....................................................................-.......................... 13 Library .............................................................................................................. 13 Summer session —........................... -........................................ -......-............ 13 Academic Information ...... — ................ -............ -............................ -.............. 13 Admission ........................................................................................................ 13 Registration ...................................................................................................... 17 Graduation requirements ........................................................... -............... 1° Student guidance service ............................................................................. 19 Grades.............................................-............. :.................................................. 20 Financial Information...........................................................- ............................. 22 Student employment ............................................................... -................... 24 Scholarships............................................-........................................................ 24 Student Activities ..............................................-................................................. 26 Associated Student Body ................................................................ -............ 26 Student organizations .................................................. -.............................. 27 Residence requirements.................................. -............................................ 27 Student health service................................................................................... 28 D iscip line ..........-............. -.....................................................................-......... 29 Description of Courses .............................................................................................30 Biblical Studies D iv ision ............................................................................... 30 Humanities Division ..................................................................................... 38 Science Division ............................................................................................. 49 Social Studies Division ................................................................................. 51 Index ...... 1.................................................................................................................. 38

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THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES

O ff icers of t h e B oard LOUIS T. TALBOT................................................................... Chancellor SAMUEL H. SUTHERLAND................................................. President RAY MYERS......................................................... Chairman of the Board JAMES R. ALLDER.......................................... Executive Vice-President HARRY HILKER................................................... Secretary of the Board E xecut ive B oard JAMES R. ALLDER................................................. ........ South Pasadena ROGER ARNEBERGH................................................... Los Angeles ARTHUR D. ENNS........................................................................Altadena JACOB C. EYMANN................................................................................LosAngeles HARRY HILKER........................................................... West Los Angeles DAVID H. ISAAC .................. Los Angeles SYLVESTER MARSHBURN........................ ............................. Placentia RAY MYERS.............................................................................................. LaCanada DANIEL ROSE........................................................................ Los Angeles SAMUEL H. SUTHERLAND ............................... Los Angeles LOUIS T. TALBOT......................................................... Pacific Palisades G en era l A dvisory B oard SENATOR NELSON S. DILWORTH.............................................. Hemet PHILLIPS D. LEHMAN......................................................... Los Angeles E. J. PETERS........................................................................................Wasco FRANK C. PHILLIPS................... ......................... ;............... Los Angeles ARTHUR WOOLSEY .................................................................. Pasadena COLLEGE ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF LOUIS T. TALBOT, LL.D........... .................................................... Chancellor SAMUEL H. SUTHERLAND, LL.D................................................ President JAMES R. ALLDER .. E xecu tive V ice-President and Business M anager JAMES H. CHRISTIAN, Th .D .................. Dean o f F acu lty and Registrar E. CHESTER BURWELL, M.A. ............. ......................... Dean o f S tuden ts ALFRED L. MILLER, B.A..................................... ..................... Dean o f M en MATILDA L. BOEHMER ................................... ................. Dean o f W om en ARNOLD D. EHLERT, M.S.L.S., Th .D ........................................ L ibrarian LEONIE V. SOUBIROU, P .H .N , M-A. ........................... M ed ica l Director JAMES 0 . HENRY, M .A ................................ Director o f S um m e r Session KENNETH B. DANIELS, Th.M ....... .......... D irector o f Christian Service JAMES A. SANDERS ............................. D irector o f Radio and Promotion DORIS WETZLER ............... .................................. A dm in is tra tiv e A ssistan t 5

DIVISION CHAIRMEN AND DEPARTMENT HEADS BIBLE STUDIES DIVISION...................................Arthur B. Whiting, Th.D. Bible Department...............................................Arthur B. Whiting, Th.D. Christian Education Department.................................. To be announced Church Polity Department.............................. James H. Christian, Th.D. Doctrine Department......................................... Gerald B. Stanton, Th.D. Missions Department....................................................... Oran Smith, D.D. HUMANITIES DIVISION ....

Paul W. Wohlgemuth, D.M.A. - ...............Inez McGahey, M.A. Paul W. Wohlgemuth, D.M.A. ............. Antonio Serrano, M.A. ........... Donald R. Burrill, M.A. .................Richard Chase, M.A. ....... Bolton Davidheiser, Ph.D. ........................To be announced ...... Bolton Davidheiser, Ph.D. ..................Wallace Emerson, Ph.D. ..................... Gloria Graham, M.S. Arnold D. Ehlert, M.S.L.S., Th.D. .............George R. Henriksen, M.S. ................. Wallace Emerson, Ph.D. ......................James O. Henry, M.A.

English Department____ Fine Arts Department .... Language Department .... Philosophy Department .. Speech Department......... SCIENCE DIVISION............... Mathematics Department Science Department ........

SOCIAL STUDIES DIVISION......... Education Department ............... Library Science Department.... Physical Education Department Psychology Department............. Social Science Department.......

FACULTY COMMITTEES ACADEMIC POLICIES: Christian, Emerson, Graham, McGahey, Moore ADMISSIONS: Christian, Boehmer, Burwell, Miller, Soubirou CURRICULUM AND CATALOG: Christian, Burrill, Emerson, Graham, McGahey, Pentney EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: Sutherland, Burwell, Christian, Daniels, Emerson, Graham, Henry, McGahey, Soubirou, Whiting, Wohlgemuth LIBRARY: Ehlert, Emerson, Henry, McCullough, McGahey, Soubirou, Whiting, Wohlgemuth SENIOR ESSAY: Pentney, Boyd, Chase, Ehlert, Stanton, Sturz SPIRITUAL LIFE: Daniels, Ebeling, Smith, Stanton, Whiting STUDENT PERSONNEL AND GUIDANCE: Burwell, Boehmer, Christian, McCullough, Miller Moore, Pentney EDUCATION DIVISION SUB-COMMITTEE: Graham, Chase, Emerson, Kindell, McCullough MUSIC DIVISION SUB-COMMITTEE: Wohlgemuth, Brown

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FACULTY SAMUEL H. SUTHERLAND, Th.B., D.D., LL.D............................. President B.A., Occidental College; Th.B., Princeton Theological Seminary; D.D., The Bible Institute of Los Angeles; LL.D., John Brown University JAMES H. CHRISTIAN, Th.D...................... Dean of Faculty and Registrar B.A., Westmont College; Th.B., The Bible Institute of Los Angeles; B.D., Th.M., Th.D., Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary WILLIAM ADAMS, B.A..................................................... Instructor in Speech B.A. Pepperdine College THELMA BAIN, M.A. ................ Assistant Professor of Christian Education B.A., Westmont College; M.A., Wheaton College MATILDA BOEHMER ,............................................................ Dean of Women Diploma, Wisconsin State Teachers College IRENE BOYD, M.A............................................. Assistant Professor of English B.A., M.A., University of California RAYNER BROWN, M.M..................................... Associate Professor of Music B.M., M.M., University of Southern California DONALD R. BURRILL, M.A...................... Assistant Professor of Philosophy B.A., Pasadena College; M.A., University of Southern California E. CHESTER BURWELL, M.A......................................... Dean of Students and B.A., M.A., Pasadena College Associate Professor of Language RICHARD CHASE, M.A.* ................................ Associate Professor of Speech B.Th., Los Angeles Bible Theological Seminary; B.A., M.A. Pepperdine College CLYDE COOK, B.A....................................... Instructor in Physical Education B.A., Biola College NORMA LEE COOK, M.A........................... Instructor in Physical Education B.A., Eastern Washington College of Education; M.A., Los Angeles State College KENNETH B. DANIELS, Th.M. .. Director of Christian Service Department Diploma, The Bible Institute of Los Angeles; B.A., Linfield College; Th.M., Dallas Theological Seminary BOLTON DAVIDHEISER, Ph.D......................................... Professor of Science B.A., Swarthmore College; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University ELMA DOSS, B.M.................................................................. Instructor in Music B.M., Chapman College *On leave, 1957-1958. 7

WILLIAM EBELING, Th.M....... .............. .... Assistant Professor of Doctrine B.A., Wheaton College; Th.B., Th.M., Dallas Theological Seminary ARNOLD EHLERT, Th.D.......... Librarian and Professor of Library Science B.A., John Fletcher College; Th. M., Th.D., Dallas Theological Semi­ nary; M.S.L.S., University of Southern California WALLACE EMERSON, Ph.D....................................... Professor of Psychology B.A., Huron College; M.A., Stanford University; Ph.D., University of Southern California ANA GAITAN, B.A................................................................ Instructor in Music B.A., Biola College GLORIA S. GRAHAM, M.S. ........................ Associate Professor of Education B.A., B.F.A., Wayne University; M.S., University of Southern Califor­ nia; Michigan and California General Elementary, Secondary Cali­ fornia Supervisor, and Administrative Credentials LESLIE STEPHEN GRAHAM, B.A................................. Instructor i n Science B.A., Pasadena College GEORGE R. HENRIKSEN, M.S................................... Instructor in Education B.A., Occidental College; M.S., University of Southern California; General and Special Secondary Credentials JAMES O. HENRY, M.A..................................... Associate Professor of History Th.B., The Bible Institute of Los Angeles; B.A., M.A., University of Southern California ELIZABETH HILTON......................................................... Instructor in Music GORDON E. HOOKER, D.S.M............................................. Instructor in Music D.S.M., The Bible Institute of Los Angeles MARTHA S. HOOKER, B.A........ Assistant Professor of Christian Education B.A., Los Angeles Baptist Theological Seminary EARLE F. HULIN, L.T.C.L............................................ :.... Instructor in Music A. T.C.L., L.T.C.L., Trinity College of Music MARY ANN IVANOFF, B.M........... .................................... Instructor in Music B. M., Los Angeles Conservatory of Music MARGARET B. JACOBSEN, M.A............ Associate Professor of Psychology B.A., M.A., Wheaton College ELWYN JOHNSON, M.A............................................. Instructor in Education B.A., University of California; M.A., University of Southern California DOROTHY KINDELL, M.R.E................................... Assistant Professor of A rt A.A., Colorado Women’s College; Art Certificate, Colorado State Teachers College; Chappell Art School; Th.B., M-R-E. Southwest Bap- tis* Theological Seminary; Colorado Normal Arts and Elementary cer­ tificates. 8

ELIZABETH McCULLOUGH, B.A............ Assistant Professor of Education B.A., University of California at Los Angeles; B.Ch.Ed., The Bible Institute of Los Angeles; General Elementary Credential INEZ McGAHEY, M .A .................................,..... Associate Professor of English Diploma, The Bible Institute of Los Angeles; B.A., Wheaton College; M.A., Los Angeles State College AL MILLER, B.A................................................................................ Dean of Men B.A., Los Angeles State College GEORGE H. MOORE, Ph.D........................ Assistant Professor of Psychology B.A., Adrian College; M.Ed., University of Oregon; Ph.D., University of Iowa ROBERT OWEN, B.A......................................................... Instructor in Missions B.A., Biola College CHESTER J. PADGETT, Th.M............................. Associate Professor of Bible A. B., Wheaton College; Th.B., The Bible Institute of Los Angeles; B.D., Th.M., Princeton Theological Seminary; D.D., John Brown University BERTHA H. PENTNEY, B.A............ ................ Assistant Professor of English Diploma, Oregon Normal School; B.A., Los Angeles Baptist Theological Seminary HERBERT RICHARDSON, Th .D ......................................... Instructor in Bible B. D., Th.D. Los Angeles Baptist Theological Seminary ROBERT R. SANDERS, M.S.......... ..................................... Instructor in Science B.A., Colorado College; M.S., Washington State College ANTONIO SERRANO, M.A.......................... Associate Professor of Language B.A., University of Madrid; B.D., United Evangelical Seminary in Madrid; M.Th., Princeton Theological Seminary; M.A., University of Barcelona ORAN SM ITH , DD ..................................................... ............ Professor of Missions Diploma, Kansas City Bible College; D.D., Bob Jones University GERALD B. STANTON, Th.D........................... ............... Professor of Doctrine B.A., Wheaton College; Th.M., Th.D., Dallas Theological Seminary HARRY STURZ, B.D ............................................... Assistant Professor of Bible B.A., Westmont College; B.D., Grace Theological Seminary ARNOLD WALL, B.A ............................................. Instructor in Church Polity B.A., Wentworth College ARTHUR B. WHITING, Th.D............................................... Professor of Bible Cliff College; Moody Bible In s titu te ; Th.B., Th .M . P ittsburgh-Xen ia Theological Sem inary ; Th.D ., Dallas Theological Sem inary PAUL W. WOHLGEMUTH , D .M .A ................ .................... Professor of Music B.A., T abo r College; M.S., Kansas S tate Teachers College; D.M.A., U n iversity of Sou thern California 9

GENERAL INFORMATION § HISTORICAL SKETCH

In 1906 “The Fisherman’s Club,” which combined Bible study and soul winning, was organized for the young men of the Immanuel Pres­ byterian Church by Rev. T. C. Horton, assistant pastor. The following year, Mr. D. H. Steele, an elder of the same church and manager of a department store, requested Mrs. Horton to open a Bible class for the young women employed in his store, offering a large room for the purpose. The group was named “The Lyceum Club” and grew to include other young women besides the employees of the one store. These two groups of young people presented the challenge of further study and training. The Bible Institute idea was not entirely new; as early as 1901 Mr. Lyman Stewart, a Christian layman with a zeal for the Lord’s service and an almost prophetic eye to the future, had planned for such a school in Los Angeles. Now, in response to an immediate need, Mr. Stewart and Mr. Horton became co-founders of the Bible Institute of Los Angeles. In the fall of 1907, through the cooperation of Rev. A. B. Pritchard, pastor of Central Presbyterian Church, some classes, which were the fore­ runner of the Bible Institute, were held in the lecture room of that church. On February 25, 1908, a meeting was called to effect a permanent organization. At this meeting the following persons were elected as officers: Lyman Stewart, President; A. B. Pritchard, Vice-President; T. C. Horton, Superintendent; R. A. Hadden, Associate Superintendent; B. C. Atterbury, Secretary; and Leon V. Shaw, Treasurer. Messrs. Horton, Hadden, and Pritchard formed the faculty. There was rapid development of the school. From the beginning its outreach was evangelistic. Shop meetings were taken over and conducted. Bible Women’s work was organized, a work among Jews was commenced, as was also Spanish Mission work and work among the men of the oil fields. Extension classes were organized in the city and in surrounding towns. Within three years the school had well outgrown the experimental stage, and a forward educational step was taken with the calling of Dr. Reuben A. Torrey to be Dean. On January 1, 1912, Dr. Torrey began his twelve-year period of service in this office. In order to meet the enlarging needs and to provide a suitable and permanent home for the school, a new site was purchased at Sixth and Hope Streets and a new building erected, ground for which was broken on June 22, 1912. This building, dedicated the following year, reflected the builders’ hopes and faith for future growth. Legally known as The Bible Institute of Los Angeles, Incorporated, this institution academically has taken four distinct forward steps in the field of Christian education. In 1936 the Institute applied for and received State authorization for the conferring of certain degrees. Three four-year courses were then 10

organized, leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Theology, Bachelor of Christian Education, and Bachelor of Sacred Music. In 1945, in an effort to extend the missionary training program of the Bible Institute, the School of Missionary Medicine was brought into being. This postgraduate year is planned as supplementary training for missionary work and is open to graduates of any school who qualify in the spiritual, intellectual, and missionary requirements that are outlined. In the summer of 1949 another forward step was taken when, in response to repeatedly stated needs of mission boards and other Christian leaders, the school increased its Faculty and enlarged its curriculum to include a Bible College with courses leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree. This school is now known academically as Biola College. The most recent expansion occurred in 1952 when, to keep Christian education in step with world missionary and evangelistic demands, the Bible Institute of Los Angeles, Incorporated, inaugurated a standard three- year Theological Seminary with courses leading to a Bachelor of Divinity degree. This school was named Talbot Seminary in honor of Dr. Louis T. Talbot, who held the office of President from 1938 to 1952 and who still serves the school in the capacity of Chancellor. To meet the demands imposed by the present student body and the enlarged curriculum a campus site of fifty-five acres was purchased in La Mirada, twenty-two miles east of Los Angeles civic center. Plans are being made to open school on the new campus in the Fall of 1958. From the small beginning of one course of study to four distinct but related schools on an enlarged campus, the story is one of steady growth and expansion. The present organization provides for a President over the whole, with a Director over each of the four schools, one of which, Biola College, presents this catalog. BUILDINGS The building which at present houses the College is a three-unit struc­ ture of which the north and south units are thirteen stories in height. The south unit known as Lyman Stewart Hall, contains the women’s dormitory, which occupies six of the thirteen floors and accommodates 400 women. The first floor is occupied by the offices and studios of the Department of Sacred Music; the second and third floors contain class­ rooms; the sixth, seventh, and eighth floors are occupied by faculty offices and classrooms; and the tenth floor is devoted to the School of Missionary Medicine and the school Infirmary and Dispensary. The north unit known as Thomas C. Horton Hall, contains further dormitory facilities, the Business and publications Departments, and School Cafeteria. The nine-story central unit contains the library, additional classrooms, and social parlors as well as the auditorium of the Church of the Open Door which is used for large student gatherings. Construction has begun on the La Mirada campus on those buildings essential for the opening of school there in September 1958. By that time the following w ill be ready for occupancy: administration, library, student union, gymnasium, classroom-auditorium, seminary, and dormitories. 11 .

STATEMENT OF DOCTRINE

The Bible, consisting of all the hooks of the Old and New Testaments, is the Word of God, a supernaturally given revelation without error or misstatement in moral and spiritual teachings and record of historical facts. There is one God, eternally existing and manifesting Himself to us in three Persons — Father, Son, and Holy Ghost. Our Lord Jesus Christ was supernaturally conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit, bom of a virgin, lived and taught and wrought mighty works and wonders and signs exactly as is recorded in the four Gospels, was put. to death by crucifixion under Pontius Pilate, was raised from the dead in the body that had been nailed to the cross, now sits at the Father’s right hand from whence He is coming again personally, bodily, and visibly to this earth to inaugurate His millennial reign. In His pre-existent state He was with God and was God, and of His own choice laid aside His divine glory and took upon Himself the form of a servant and was made in the likeness of men. He became in every respect a real man, possessed of all the essential character­ istics of human nature. By His death upon the cross, the Lord Jesus Christ made a perfect atonement for sin, redeeming us from thé curse of the law by becoming a curse in our place. The Holy Spirit is a Person, is God, and is possessed of all the distinctively divine attributes; He indwells all believers, having baptized them into the body of Christ at the time of regeneration. Man was created in the image of God, but the whole human race fell in the sin of the first Adam, and apart from Christ is spiritually dead and lost. Men are justified on the simple and single ground of the shed blood of Christ and upon the simple and single condition of faith in Him who shed the blood, and are born again by the Holy Spirit, through the instrumentality of the Word of God. All those who receive Jesus Christ as their Saviour and their Lord, and who confess Him as such before their fellow men become heirs of God and joint-heirs with Jesus Christ and at death their spirits depart to be with Christ in conscious blessedness, and at the second coming of Christ their bodies shall be raised and transformed into the likeness of the body of His glory. All those who persistently reject Jesus Christ in the present life shall be raised from the dead and throughout eternity exist in a state of conscious and endless torment. The Church consists of all those who, in this present dispensation, truly believe on Jesus Christ and is the body and bride of Christ, which Christ loves and for which He has given Himself. There is a personal devil, a being of great cunning who can exert vast power only so far as God suffers him to do so, and who shall ultimately be cast into the lake of fire and brimstone. — Abridged. 12

INTERDENOMINATIONAL CHARACTER OF BIOLA COLLEGE

Biola College is an interdenominational school of college rank empha­ sizing thorough scholarship and is committed to the evangelical doctrines of the Christian Church. It earnestly endeavors to make these historic doctrines a vital reality in the spiritual life of this present generation. THE CORPORATION The Bible Institute of Los Angeles, Incorporated, has been granted in its charter by the State of California broad powers of educational service, as w ill be seen by the following quotation from the Consolidation Agree­ ment of 1936: “The purposes for which the consolidated corporation is formed are: (a) To establish, equip, conduct and maintain, for the instruction and training of Christian men and women in the knowledge of the Word of God and in effective service for Christ, an institution or institutions to be used, conducted and maintained as a college and seminary of learning of collegiate grade, (b) To create and establish a college for the purpose of giving theological education, and such other instruction as may be needful and advantageous in preparing and qualifying ministers and other persons for Christian work, and the Board of Trustees and Faculty shall be author­ ized to confer upon any student or said college, or any other person, any of the degrees usually conferred by theological seminaries, or other degrees arising from its course of studies, and exercise all powers, rights and duties appertaining to theological seminaries provided for or authorized under the laws of the State of California.” It will be observed from this that the future necessary development of the College was envisioned by the Board and that an increase in educational standards on the part of the school was anticipated and provided for in order that the educational demands on the part of the church, mission boards, and Christian education leaders be met.

THE OBJECTIVES OF THE COLLEGE

Academic Objectives: The College seeks to provide thorough training and sound scholarship in all of the areas of study which are provided in its curriculum. It further seeks to create in the students a thirst for knowledge and to teach effective methods of investigation whereby such knowledge may be obtained during the course of study and in the years following their formal period of training. Civic Objectives: The College holds to the conviction that the good Christian is likewise a good citizen of the State. It teaches, both by precept and example, that 13

good citizens respect authority and submit to the laws of the land. The College encourages the students to paricipate actively, while in college and throughout life, in the development of the general welfare of their fellowmen, both in community and national life. It further seeks to instill a genuine concern for the general welfare of mankind the world around. Cultural Objectives: The College seeks to provide students with a wholesome cultural pro­ gram which w ill inculcate an appreciation for the finer things of life as expressed in the fine arts, literature, history, and the civilizations of peoples and nations both past and present. Social Objectives: The College seeks to provide the students with a well-rounded social program that w ill develop personality and fit them in a normal and wholesome manner to take their places in home, local church, and com­ munity. The program is further designed to develop and maintain high moral standards in the lives of the students, for their own benefit and in order that they might serve as wholesome examples and leaders wherever they may live and work. Spiritual Objectives: The College aims to send forth men and women who express through their lives a complete and valid commitment to the claims of Christ; a comprehensive knowledge of the Word of God, with ability to use it in all walks of life in leading men to Christ and, with wisdom, to teach it to beilevers that they may grow in grace; and an enduement with power by the infilling of the Holy Spirit, expressing itself in Christian love for all men and a desire for their salvation. Vocational Objectives: The College seeks to provide thorough preparatory training in those areas of its curriculum in which students may desire to pursue graduate work leading to a profession. It seeks also to provide adequate terminal training in those areas of its curriculum which are ,designed to prepare students for their life work. STANDARDS OF CONDUCT The conduct of a Biola College student is expected to conform to the highest Christian standard. The rule by which he lives is the earnest striving for God’s approval and the conscious protection of his Christian testimony. Specifically, there are certain practices which are contrary to the standards of Biola College and from which, therefore, all students are to refrain as long as they are in school: the use of alcoholic beverages or tobacco, attendance at commercial theatres, dancing, the use of playing cards, and gambling in any form. 14

BOOK STORE The school operates the Biola Book Room, which handles the textbooks used in all classes. THE LIBRARY The Biola Library is under a unified administration, and the main collection serves all Biola schools. Departmental collections are also main­ tained for the two graduate schools: The School of Missionary Medicine and Talbot Theological Seminary. Present holdings include about 28,000 volumes, including periodicals, and a collection of 287 Braille titles. In auxiliary collections are to be found pamphlet files, a curriculum collection for the Education Division and the Christian Education Department, an audio-visual center in which are flat pictures, flannelgraph materials, slides, phonograph records, object lessons, a story file, etc. A number of special indexes provide access to the complete run of The King’s Business magazine and to partial runs of other periodicals, to songs and hymns, sermons and sermon outlines, homiletic and poetic illustrations, and similar materials. The main public catalog and other card files contain in all approximately 140,000 cards. Students also have access to the huge collection of the Los Angeles Public Library half a block away, and graduate students have access to all the scholarly libraries of the area, which contain several million volumes. The staff consists of the Librarian, three Assistants, and several part-time student assistants. The Librarian is Director of the Library Science Depart­ ment, which offers a minor in the College. The Library is an ideal workshop for students in Library Science, and it is the purpose of the staff to make it a model for study. Cataloging is being done according to the standards of the American Library Association and the Library of Congress. AUDIO VISUAL AND FILM PRODUCTION DEPARTMENT The Audio Visual and Film Production Department exists for the pur­ pose of editing and showing educational films, producing film for educa­ tional and missionary purposes, and of providing other recording and projective equipment needed for lecture or clinical work in all college departments. SUMMER SESSION Each year the College conducts a Summer Session in which members of the regular faculty serve as instructors. College credit is granted upon satisfactory completion of courses. The regular academic entrance require­ ments apply to those who enroll during the Summer. For information concerning the Summer Session, write to the Director of the Summer Session. 15

ACADEMIC INFORMATION §

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS AND APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION

Each applicant must secure from the Admissions Office regular applica­ tion forms. He must also request from each secondary school which he has attended a complete, official transcript. These forms and transcripts should be filed with the Admissions Office one month before the semester opens. A deposit of $10.00 must accompany the personal application form, This amount w ill be applied to the registration fee at the time of enrollment, or w ill be refunded if notice of change of plan is given one month before the semester opens, or if the student has not been accepted for admission. An accepted student who does not enter when expected may request that his application be extended to the following semester. A student who delays entrance for a year must file a current medical record. FRESHMAN STANDING. An applicant for regular standing must be a graduate of an accredited high school, or a veteran who has passed satis­ factorily the G.E.D. Test, and should have been a Christian for at least one year. Applicants for regular standing should meet the following requirements: English ........................................................................................... 3 units Social Science ...............:.......................... ...................... ...r...... 2 units Language (in one language) ............................... ,................ 2 units Science ............................................................................................ 1 unit E lectives........................ 7 units Equivalent subjects may be accepted in lieu of specific requirements. A “C” average is necessary in the specific requirements. Applicants who cannot meet the specific or equivalent prerequisite requirements w ill be admitted to provisional standing until deficiencies have been removed. All deficiencies, which must be cleared by the begin­ ning of the sophomore year, may be made up by taking college courses which cover the required material. Credits earned to cover a high school defiiciency cannot be applied toward graduation from College. Applicants must pass satisfactorily the tests provided for the College by the California Testing Bureau and the Educational Testing Service. ADVANCED STANDING. Applicants for advanced standing must present the same application forms and transcripts as those applying for freshman standing. The transcript from the last school attended must bear the statement of honorable dismissal. 16

Students transferring from accredited schools w ill receive credit for courses which are equivalent to Biola’s requirements for graduation. Stu­ dents transferring from non-accredited institutions may receive credit in Bible and related subjects by validation examinations or by satisfactory completion of twelve units of work taken during the first semester. A minimum grade average of “C” is required for admission with advanced standing. Students entering the College with advanced standing must meet the residence requirements for graduation: the Senior year of residence with at least twelve hours of classroom work per semester. SPECIAL STANDING. Those who present reasons satisfactory to the Admissions Committee are privileged to take an elective course consisting of a minimum of five hours of classroom work which includes at least one Bible subject. Unless sufficient reason is presented, a student is not allowed to remain in this classification for more than one year. REGISTRATION All students should register during scheduled registration days. Late registration w ill continue two weeks after the regular registration days. A late registration fee of $5.00 w ill be charged during the first week, and $10.00 during the second week. Registration is not complete until tuition and fees have been paid. Students w ill receive credit for only those courses in which they are officially enrolled in the Registrar’s Office. CHANGE OF REGISTRATION A student who finds it necessary to drop or add a subject must secure from the Registrar’s Office the proper form for such procedure. A student who drops a course without fulfilling this requirement w ill receive an “F” in the subject. A charge of fifty cents is made for each class change. Changes in registration may be made during the two weeks of late registration. After that date courses cannot be added. Courses may be dropped without penalty during the first six weeks of class work provided that the student is doing work of a passing grade at the time of withdrawal. A grade of “F” is given for work below passing grade. Students who drop a course for reasons of health after the sixth week must secure from the Medical Department a statement of physical inability to carry the academic load. W ITHDRAWAL A student who officially withdraws from college during a semester w ill receive a grade of “W” in all courses in which the work is of passing grade at the time of withdrawal; otherwise, a grade of “WF” w ill be given. A student who withdraws may be granted honorable dismissal provided that he has met all of his financial obligations to the college, has secured from the Admissions Office and completed all forms for withdrawal, and is in good standing at the time. A student who withdraws unofficially, that is, has not completed the proper forms supplied by the Admissions Office, w ill not receive a refund 17

of any portion of his tuition or fees, and w ill receive a grade of “WF” in each course. If he has no financial obligations to the college, a transcript of his work w ill be sent to another school upon request. GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS The Bachelor of Arts Degree. This degree is offered with majors in several fields listed below. Specific requirements for the degree are outlined in the departmental sections of this catalogue. In addition, all candidates for degrees must satisfy the requirements described below. The Bachelor of Music Degree. This degree is offered with a major in Music. The requirements described below and the specific courses outlined in the departmental section must be completed for graduation. Additional information may be obtained by writing to the Department of Music for a special bulletin. Biola offers two distinct types of curricula: professional and liberal arts. There are four majors in the professional curricula: Bible, Christian Educa­ tion, Missions, and Music. A minimum of 128 units and an equal number of grade points is required for graduation. A grade point average of 1.5 is required in the major field. There are five majors offered in the liberal arts curricula: Education, English, History, Music, and Psychology. A minimum of 158 units with a grade point average of 1.5 in the major field is required for graduation in all except Music which requires 162. These majors may be completed in four years by taking additional units and attending some summer sessions; or they may be completed by lengthening the course of study to five years. Included in all majors, except Bible, are 30 units of Bible and Doctrine according to the requirement of the Accrediting Association of Bible Insti­ tutes and Bible Colleges. In the Bible major, 30 units of Bible and 10 units of Doctrine are required. The requirements in Bible and Doctrine common to all majors are as follows: Bible 101, 102, 103, 201, 202, 401, 402 Church Polity Doctrine 101 The general educational requirements in all majors except Music are as follows: English: Grammar andcomposition.............................. 6 Literature.................................................. j................................. g Science: Life -.................................................................................................. 8 Physical .................... 4 History: World ........................................... g U.S. History andConstitution........................ 4 Speech............................................................. ......................... . |§j...... 4 Philosophy ...............!........................................................................ 3 18

Psychology.........................—........... -....................................................... 3 Introduction to the Arts .......................................................................... 2 Physical Education.................... ......................... -................................... 2 Additional requirements are listed under the departments offering majors. Each student is assigned some form of practical Christian service, for which he is given credit each semester. These Christian service credits are required for gaduation but are not computed in the student’s academic load. In addition to receiving satisfacory scholastic rating in all required courses, a student must give satisfactory evidence of good Christian char­ acter and soundness of doctrine, as set forth in the unabridged form of the Statement of Doctrine. An essay, not exceeding 1500 words, on any Bible subject the student may select, is a graduation requirement and shall be submitted by each prospective senior not later than the eighth week of the fall semester preceding his graduation. STUDENT GUIDANCE SERVICE Since the establishment of the Personnel Department, the following steps were taken in the development of the counseling program. First, a centralized record system was adopted including cumulative interview forms. Second, a freshman testing program was begun to provide counselors with accurate data regarding the student’s academic aptitude as well as per­ sonality traits. Third, channels were established with the Registrar’s Office so that transcripts and grade records were made available to counselors. Accordingly, students are grouped on the basis of major and interest under a faculty counselor whose responsibility it becomes to guide each student of his group through college years and to recommend him to the Qualifi­ cations Committee for graduation when his schooling terminates. Finally, there has been the addition of freshman orientation composed of lectures and discussions brought by various members who are in touch with common problems. The objectives of the counseling program have been interrelated with the disciplinary system of the school. A minimum number of rules is combined with instruction in Christian principles of conduct for the pur­ pose of encouraging students toward mature self-guidance. CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS A student’s classification is determined at the beginning of the fall semester according to the following plan:

Four Year Program

26 units or less 27 units and 27 grade points 57 units and 57 grade points 91 units and 91 grade points 19

Freshman Sophomore

Junior Senior

Five Year Program

Freshman Sophomore

26 units or less

27 units and 27 grade points 57 units and 57 grade points 121 units and 121 grade points

Junior Senior

ATTENDANCE Attendance at each class session, chapel, and assembly is required of all students. If a student’s unexcused absences from any class become double the number of meetings per week, the student is dropped from that class with a grade of F. Unexcused absences from Chapel and Assembly in excess of ten result in disciplinary action.

GRADES A Distinguished work, which is reserved for outstanding attainment ............

3

B Good work done in a sustained manner.................................. 2 C Average work done in a sustained manner............................. 1 D Passing ................................................................................ q F Failing work. Subject must be repeated in c la ss ................... -1 Fa Failure due to excessive unexcused absences......................... -1 Dr Dropped from class, passing Drf Dropped from class, fa i l in g ........................................................ _1 W Withdrew from school, passing Wf Withdrew from school, fa i l in g ................................................. -1 I Incomplete A semester grade in any subject is based on the student’s grasp of subject matter as evidenced by his daily class work and his examinations. To graduate a student must have at least as many grade points as units in the total credit value of all courses undertaken by him, and a 1.5 average in the major field. Report cards showing grades w ill be issued to students from the Registrar’s Office. ACADEMIC LOAD A full-time student may register for twelve to sixteen hours of classroom work per semester. After the first semester a student with a grade point average of B may petition the Registrar to take eighteen units whereas one with an A average may petition to carry twenty. In no case w ill a student be permitted to carry more than twenty hours. A student on scholastic probation may not carry more than fourteen hours for credit and may be limited to less depending upon his grade point average. 20

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