Physical Therapy Services of Tennessee December 2018

DECEMBER 2018

www.ptstn.net (423) 543-0073

EastTennessee Physical Therapy News

Here we are again with the holidays rapidly approaching. Where did the summer and, particularly, the fall go? We at PTS continue to be busy with athletes from all the surrounding schools and rehabilitation from sports- related injuries. These student-athletes are trying to get ready for winter and spring sports and we are doing our best to get them back to playing as quickly and safely as possible. Our pediatric and orthopedic case loads continue to increase. The pediatrics, especially, with our work in the Elizabethton City School System and the Carter County School System. We see children with a variety of physical and learning disabilities. Our orthopedic case load increases this time of year with individuals who have elective surgery after their deductible has been met. Remember, you DO NOT need a physician referral to see any of our staff for evaluation or consultation. FROM THE DESK OF Dr. Smith

R emembering P earl H arbor T he A ttack T hat B rought W orld W ar II to A merica

“Yesterday, Dec. 7, 1941 — a date which will live in infamy — the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the empire of Japan. […] It will be recorded that the distance of Hawaii from Japan makes it obvious that the attack was deliberately planned many days or even weeks ago. [...] With confidence in our armed forces, with the unbounding determination of our people, we will gain the inevitable triumph — so help us, God. I ask that the Congress declare that, since the unprovoked and dastardly attack by Japan on Sunday, Dec. 7, 1941, a state of war has existed between the United States and the Japanese empire.” – President Franklin D. Roosevelt The attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 led to the severe destruction of the United States Pacific Fleet, but it lit a flame in the hearts of Americans. The sudden strike by the Japanese forces destroyed 20 American vessels, eight of which were battleships, and over 300 were airplanes. Over 2,000 military and civilian American lives were lost, and another 1,000 suffered injuries. The following day, President Roosevelt gave his Pearl Harbor address to the nation, urging Congress to take action and declare war on Japan. This event brought the citizens of America together for the first time since WWII began. It was time to go to war. Although the attack caught America by surprise, the war had seemed unavoidable for some time. In 1937, Japan declared war on China to seize its import market for financial gain and to expand Japan’s territory. The Japanese government had been struggling with economic and social issues, and its leaders sought to solve these problems by taking the land of neighboring countries. In retaliation, America attempted to intimidate Japan by banning further trade with them. Instead, this action only made the Japanese government

–Danny

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Slipping & Falling When You Can’ t Stop the Fal l , Rol l With It more reluctant to leave China. In the years that followed Japan’s declaration, Washington, D.C., and Tokyo engaged in negotiations, but neither were willing to budge. Japanese forces planned their attack on the United States for several months before putting their devastating plans into action. Their goal was to destroy the United States Pacific Fleet in order to remove any opposition to their takeover of the South Pacific. While their attack was incredibly damaging, it didn’t incapacitate the fleet. Pearl Harbor’s aircraft carriers were away when the attack took place and were considered the most important aspect of a naval fleet at that time. The Japanese also failed to destroy the U.S. Navy’s oil storage depots, repair shops, and submarine and shipyard docks, allowing the navy to recuperate quickly from the attack. There are many memorials to remind U.S. citizens of that day. A marble memorial was built over the fallen USS Arizona, dedicated

to all military persons who were killed in the attack. Another monument was built on the northwest shore of Ford Island, close to where the USS Utah sank. In later years, the ship was added to the national register of historic places and was declared a national historic landmark.

Dec. 7 serves as National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day. It honors individuals who survived the attack and those who did not. Remember those who lost their lives on that day and throughout WWII and the other brave soldiers who fought to keep the freedoms we have today.

Slick roads and icy sidewalks become part of the landscape every winter, and every year the risk of falling is very real. For many people, avoiding a fall can be difficult enough without ice coating every walkable surface. Young or old, here are a few ways you can stay on your feet this month. The correct footwear can save you from a nasty tumble or heart-stopping slip. Finding boots that are specifically designed to keep you steady on a slippery surface is a must. It’s also a great idea to buy waterproof footwear to keep your feet warm and dry in the snow. Ice cleats can be helpful as well; they slip over your regular shoes and give you the added grip you need. If you don’t want to wear your winter boots anywhere but outside, bring an extra set of shoes with you so that you can switch once indoors. IF THE BOOT FITS

hands out of your pockets, which will help you balance should you start to slip. It also helps to spread your weight out evenly by not walking with your feet close together. Try not to be distracted when you’re walking on ice — keep your eyes forward and make sure you know where you’re placing your feet. Unfortunately, even with all the precautions in the world, falls still happen. While no one has invented a way to trip and fall gracefully, there are a few ways you can avoid a serious injury when it does happen. If you find yourself starting to fall, lean forward to help prevent a direct impact to your spine or the back of your head. Try to roll with it, or, if you’re falling backward, try to land on your bottom. Also, try not to catch your full weight with your arms or hands, as that can lead to broken arms or wrists. If you do slip and fall this winter, it’s important to address your injury. It’s better to seek out medical attention than ignore the problem, which can only get worse the longer you put it off. KNOWING HOW TO FALL

ONE STEP AT A TIME

It’s important to move cautiously when you’re on an icy sidewalk. Make sure to keep your feet flat while you’re walking and your

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4 Fitness Goal Mistakes to Avoid

3. SETTING UNREALISTIC GOALS Challenging yourself is one thing; setting yourself up for failure is another. If you spent three years putting on weight, it’s not going to come off in three weeks. If you’re juggling a 50-hour work week with a family and chores, you’re probably kidding yourself by swearing to hit the gym every night after work for an hour. If you’re a hardgainer, trying to look like Arnold will be an exercise in futility. Don’t be afraid to push yourself, but set goals you stand a chance of achieving. Once you hit those successfully, set some new ones! 4. LETTING INSTAGRAM INFLUENCE YOUR GOALS Your favorite fitness Instagrammers may look like gods and goddesses online, but keep in mind that they’re only showing you their best selves on their best days with the best angles and lighting. Instead of trying to be someone else, focus on yourself! Just because they’re hitting PRs or rocking bikinis or eating a vegan diet doesn’t mean you have to. Decide what you really care about, then choose goals that will make your life better every day — even when the camera isn’t around. Set the Right Goals This New Year

Choosing the right goal is perhaps the most important part of achievement. Be brave and challenge yourself this year, but increase your chances of success by avoiding these four common pitfalls. 1. GETTING ‘TONED,’‘BUFF,’ OR ‘IN SHAPE’ Do yourself a favor and delete vague fitness terms like these from your vocabulary; they don’t mean anything, and there’s no way to achieve them without a concrete definition. For instance, once you understand that “toned” really means “lean and muscular,” you can create a workout plan than helps you shed fat and reveal muscle. And “in shape” can have different meanings depending on your current fitness level. To you, does it mean completing a difficult WOD, losing weight, or reducing your blood pressure? Be as specific as possible when creating your goal. 2. LOSING A LARGE AMOUNT OF WEIGHT Losing lots of weight is fine as a long-term goal, but it will take a while. To prevent feelings of discouragement and failure, it’s best to create smaller milestones to hit along the way. Decide what you can realistically achieve during a manageable period of time — perhaps 3–6 months — and make that your first goal. While the scale is a handy tool to evaluate your progress, don’t rely on these numbers alone. Use multiple techniques, such as progress photos, measurements, and the way your clothes fit.

Don’t wait until January to get started. Decide ahead of time what you want to achieve, make a plan now, and set yourself up for success!

Take a Break!

Holiday Roast Prime Rib

INGREDIENTS •

1 bone-in prime rib (6–7 pounds)

1 tablespoon fresh thyme, chopped Salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

8 cloves garlic, thinly sliced

2 cups red wine

4 cups beef stock

DIRECTIONS 1. 30 minutes before cooking, remove roast from fridge and let sit until it reaches room temperature. 2. Heat oven to 350 F. 3. Make small slits in prime rib and stuff with slices of garlic. Liberally season with salt and pepper. 4. Place a rack inside a roasting pan and roast prime rib for 2 hours, until medium-rare.

5. Tomake au jus, place roasting pan with drippings from roast over 2 burners on high. Add wine and scrape pan as liquid reduces. Add beef stock and cook until reduced by half. Finally, sprinkle in thyme. 6. Slice roast and serve topped with au jus.

Inspired by foodnetwork.com

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1975 West Elk Ave. Elizabethton, TN, 37643 (423) 543-0073

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Inside This Issue From the Desk of Dr. Smith PAGE 1 Remembering Pearl Harbor PAGE 1 How to Slip and Fall the Right Way PAGE 2 4 Fitness Goal Mistakes to Avoid PAGE 3 Take a Break PAGE 3 Holiday Roast Prime Rib PAGE 3 Hurricane Pet Hero PAGE 4

How One Man Rescued Hundreds of Animals HURRICANE HEROTONY ALSUP

In the wake of destruction, it’s easy to focus on self-preservation. After all, fight-or-flight instincts are hard-wired into our brains so that we can survive dangerous situations. But while fear drives the actions of many in times of chaos, there are a few who find greater strength in compassion. Tony Alsup considered the potential devastation of Hurricane Florence as he sat comfortably in his home in Greeneville, Tennessee. Rather than sit back and watch, the truck driver by trade packed up an out-of- commission school bus he’d bought and set off to South Carolina with one goal in mind: to save as many animals as possible. Stopping by every shelter he found along the coast, Alsup rescued over 60 cats and dogs in both North and South Carolina and took them to Foley, Alabama.

rushed into danger for a good cause. He’d originally purchased the school bus, which he turned into Noah’s Ark last year, to save animals in Texas and Florida as Hurricane Harvey pounded the Gulf Coast. When he finished there, his mission shifted to helping animals in Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria ravaged the island. It’s said that character is defined by the way someone acts when no one is watching. Many people heard of Alsup’s bravery after the devastation of Florence, but as news stories turned to sports, politics, and business, America slowly moved on. Victims of the hurricane who lacked supplies received less national attention, but more than a month later, Alsup’s commitment to the cause was as strong as ever. Living out of the back of the bus for weeks, he drove pets out of the persistent flooding and convoyed shipments of desperately needed supplies to the coastal Carolina towns.

You can follow Tony’s commitment on Facebook. He’s not asking for money or fame; he’s just a person with heart to serve, using social media to promote awareness about those who desperately need our help. If you’re wondering what drives such a person, you can find it written at the bottom of every update he posts: “Love y’all, mean it.”

The heroic efforts of Alsup saved the lives of many animals, but it wasn’t the first time he’d

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