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HERE LIES LOVE David Byrne, Fatboy Slim, and Imelda Marcos Go Disco ‑ NYC Ballet’s

Fall Gala Choreography and Couture P L U S : THIRD EYE Photography Icon

RODNEY SMITH MIAMI BOOK FAIR Miami’s Annual Literary Wonderland

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features

Fall 2023

16 NYC Ballet’s Fall Gala Choreography and Couture BY SARAH JESSICA PARKER 10 Here Lies Love David Byrne, Fatboy Slim, and Imelda Marcos Go Disco BY IRIS WIENER

22 Miami Book Fair Miami’s Annual Literary Wonderland ILLUSTRATIONS BY BOB ECKSTEIN

30 THIRD EYE A Leap of Faith Photography Icon Rodney Smith 24 Mmuseumm NYC’s Miniscule Museum BY CARLY SILVER / PHOTOS BY AYALA GAZIT 26 FICTION The Guest An outsider on the East End BY EMMA CLINE

TOP: PHOTO BY RODNEY SMITH BOTTOM: NEW YORK CITY BALLET’S 2022 FALL GALA. PHOTO BY SEAN ZANNI LEFT: ILLUSTRATION BY BOB ECKSTEIN

 

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Editor & Publisher Camillo Ferrari Executive Editor

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General Counsel Bruce Koffsky, Esq. Digital Designer Michael Carpenter Sales Reps Emma Chase, Carly Davis, Kristen Mangino, Jordan Paulick, Matthew Troxel Contributors Emma Cline, Anne Cunningham, Evelyn Kanter, Helen Keller, Sarah Jessica Parker, George Ranalli, Carly Silver, Devin Wallace, Iris Wiener Photographers Ayala Gazit, Paula Koffsky, Rodney Smith Illustrators Bob Eckstein Cover Illustration: ©2023 Davide Bonazzi c/o theispot Cartoons Bob Eckstein Advertising & Editorial Inquiries publisher@presencemediagroup.us @westonmagazines ISSUE 69 Copyright 2023 Presence Media Group. All rights reserved. WMG: The Luxury Constellation westonmagazinegroup.com

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Here Lies Love walls of what we would do Off-Broadway at the Public. We did all of our staged platforms and confined ourselves to that in a very DIY way as we road-tested the design and the evolution of how the platforms moved for very little money over a couple of weekends.” Thus, Here Lies Love was officially on its way to be- coming a Broadway marvel. According to Korins, the path to Broadway was incredibly circuitous, in part because they needed to find a venue that could be redesigned to uphold their vision-not to mention, they had to contend with the pandemic. “This was not a project where part of the audience could stand next to each other and dance while they’re huffing and puffing,” he says. When the show was a hit Off-Broadway, everyone’s immediate thought was that it would ultimately land on Broadway. “We didn’t

“ You have to see it!” Based on the rise of former Filipina First Lady Imelda Marcos and her subsequent fall at the hands of the Philippine People Power Revolution, Here Lies Love is an intoxicating party of Studio 54 meets Imelda Marcos and Filipino pride. The show began as a concept album by David Byrne (Acad- Everyone’s talking about Here Lies Love , a groundbreaking triumph that is changing the way people experience a Broadway musical.

emy Award, Grammy Award, and Tony Award winner) and Fatboy Slim (Grammy Award winner). Fourteen years ago, Tony Award-winning director Alex Timbers pitched Byrne the concept of a production with an innovative and transformative design that

David Byrne, Fatboy Slim and Imelda Marcos Hit the Disco

brings audiences into a dance club with moving platforms and sets intertwined throughout the standing room dance floor. “I was inspired by thinking about Studio 54 and nightclubs,” re- members Timbers. “I liked the idea of a place where there were moving stages and light sculptures and the show would just wrap around you. It was one of those things where you go in and pitch something and it could be a suicide mission because no one is going to do something as crazy as this! But David said I saw it exactly as he saw it.” Once Timbers and Byrne had fleshed out the music, he and his team, which included Beetlejuice and Hamilton scenic de- signer David Korins, began the design phase. They mounted their first production in a black box theatre at New York Uni- versity, splitting the room in half to experiment with using two different spaces. That led to a workshop at PS 122 where Here Lies Love grew to having stairs and a rotating platform. “At that point it didn’t resemble anything like a stage design,” says Tim- bers, laughing. He and Korins began plotting the shape of the show with cardboard blocks, before trying it out at Massachu- setts Museum of Contemporary Art (MASS MoCA) in a co- production with Williamstown Theatre Festival and the Public Theater. “We were in a giant warehouse and we taped out the Broadway production photos by Billy Bustamante, Matthew Murphy, and Evan Zimmerman

know how we could possibly fit our design into a Broadway theatre with the amount of people who would have to see the show to make it a

By Iris Wiener

success,” Korins remembers. There were very few theatres in which Here Lies Love would actually fit. “Alex and I made a deal with each other ten years ago that come hell or high water, we were going to combine and figure out a producing organization, the producers and the theatre. We did that!” says Korins. After a lot of searching, they found the Broadway Theatre, which also housed the behemoth King Kong , and was the appropriate size. “To the producers’ credit, they championed the original design of Here Lies Love and the DNA of the show, which was incredible,” says Korins.

@ WESTONMAGAZINES 11

“One of the things that’s also great about David’s design is that we did not knock down walls or bore holes through the ceiling of the theatre,” says Timbers of the massive production that has more than thirty scenic moves that involve a tremen- dous amount of reconfiguring. “Seats have been pulled out and carefully stored, there is nothing that we’ve done that is destruc- tive to the theatre itself.” Conrad Ricamora, who has been playing Ninoy Aquino (a leader of the opposition party during the Marcos administra- tion), since the Public Theater production in 2013, has enjoyed experiencing the many incarnations of the show. “I think the elements around the storytelling-the projections, the sound de- sign, etc.-have become clearer and sharper,” he says. “I remem- ber when projections were rarely used in theatre and now the technology around the storytelling has really improved. They can do remarkable things and Here Lies Love showcases that.” After working on the immersive Van Gogh experience and

feels relevant in this moment.” As part of the first all-Filipino cast, Ricamora proudly con- siders his reasons for continuing to work on Here Lies Love throughout its journey to Broadway. “It is such an important story about the pitfalls of following an idol or idolizing anyone, especially a politician who has the ability to steal from their citi- zens and set self-serving policies,” he says. “If I can be a part of that message I will always come back to it.” Many audiences know very little about Imelda Marcos and her regime, so Ricamora recognizes the importance of bringing awareness as well. “Since the 2016 election, we’ve seen how precarious our own democracy is. Also, the fact that Imelda’s son is now presi- dent of the Philippines makes it more important that we not forget this history so that it doesn’t repeat itself.” Korins understands that Here Lies Love ’s powerful messages even resonate differently since the Off-Broadway production in 2013. “The fact that Bongbong Marcos is president of the Phil-

THE SHOW IS ULTIMATELY ABOUT THE FRAGILITY OF DEMOCRACY , AND IT’S A CAUTIONARY TALE OF WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU GET SEDUCED BY DICTATORS AND WHAT THAT FEELS LIKE.

an immersive Disney experience, Korins is easily able to compare Here Lies Love’ s presentation to that of another, well, minor hit. “ Phantom of the Opera signified a massive seismic shift in the the- atrical landscape when it came to New York. I think Here Lies Love also signifies a pretty major direction that theatre and theatergoers are going in with regard to immersion. Everyone is looking for more powerful, poignant ways to expe- rience storytelling and to story-tell.” Korins describes Here Lies Love as history-making for a number of reasons. “We did not invent immersive theatre, but we did invent environmental theatre,” he says. “In a lot of ways, it is going to become a seminal theatre-going experience for people. It’s introducing them to a piece of history that I don’t think they’re even aware of, but it’s incredibly meaningful and super poignant right now. The show is ultimately about the fra- gility of democracy, and it’s a cautionary tale of what happens when you get seduced by dictators and what that feels like. It

ippines again, and the Marcos’ are back in power, that is a crazy, extraordinary bizarre turn of historical events, and it really makes the show a zeitgeist moment on stage,” he says. The audience feels Here Lies Love ’s impact in a number of ways. In some moments, Here Lies Love casts the audience as rioters, as people who are at election rallies, as people who are at a funeral, and as people who are at a wedding. “It’s not, however, audience participation,” says Korins, with a reminder that audi- ences get to choose how to experience the show, whether seated or standing. “It really is pretty darn epic. People have never had the experience of standing up and having the scenery literally move around you, and it is powerful.” Timbers recalls the complexity of Broadway previews, when

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asks all of us as actors to commit to the people we are portraying more. We are a part of the audience so there is no hiding or faking it be- cause we are literally face to face with them.” People who have the shared ex- perience of seeing Here Lies Love frequently ask the same question: “Where did you sit?” Audiences are flocking to see the show more than once, vying for different perspec- tives each time. “It’s like a Ror- schach test of how people think they want to experience it,” de- scribes Korins. Andrew Defrin, a theatre direct- ing major at Fordham University, immediately knew that he had to

his team worked to make sure audiences were getting a full ex- perience from all seating options. “We constantly re-staged,” he says. “Every day in previews we would pick three musical num- bers out of the 26, and we would restage those numbers to em- brace the mezzanine and the side galleries.” Incrementally, every day made the show better for audiences sitting in all sections, as the theatre is loosely in the round. “If you saw the show at the first preview versus the final preview, it was drastically different. Everyone was like, ‘We were not expecting to work this hard!’” Timbers says, laughing. “Preview performances are always about big changes and re- staging and re-writing,” says Ricamora, whose Aquino, the leader of the opposition party during the Marcos administra- tion, has some of the most emotionally devastating moments in the show. “It’s thrilling and terrifying. [Here Lies Love] really

see Here Lies Love a second time after enjoying it from the rear mezzanine. “So much action happens in the mezzanine!” he says. “Seeing the show through different viewpoints gives it entirely new meaning at each performance.” Defrin watched the standing audience members and realized how much fun they were having, so he purchased another ticket. “When I was standing, I felt like I was in a nightclub. You’re dancing, up close, intimate with the actors, and it was a truly insane experience!” “When I see a piece of theatre I want to be transported, whether that’s something like Moulin Rouge , where you walk in the doors and you’re in 1900s Paris in this experiential nightclub, or somewhere else,” says Timbers, who also trans- formed the Winter Garden Theatre for Beetlejuice . “I get ex- cited about leaving the everyday and going somewhere else. I also love when the audience is acknowledged as a participant in the drama. I like to know I’m part of the collective storytell- ing. Those are all of the things Here Lies Love celebrates. It’s looking at a provocative topic and political theatre through a pop music video lens. I hope that for other people Here Lies Love feels like having a conversation with not only what’s hap- pening in the political world today, but also the visual and music world.” “I feel like there’s never a real sense of urgency to see some- thing,” says Korins when considering the state of theatre. “Peo- ple wait and see. What’s happening at the Broadway Theatre is incredibly special. There is an urgency to this that I want people to take seriously. More than any show I have ever worked on, the word of mouth is extraordinary. When you walk out of that theatre, there is no qualifier.” * Iris Wiener is a professional entertainment writer, reporter, and theatre critic. Her work as an interviewer and reviewer has been featured in more than fifteen publications, including Playbill , Newsday , TheaterMania , and OK! Magazine .

@ WESTONMAGAZINES 13

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GEORGE BALANCHINE,

the legendary co- founder of New York City Ballet, once said

“There is only now.” Today New York City Ballet continues to take those words to heart. The Company doesn’t just honor Balanchine by preserving his works, they honor him by keeping ballet in the now— by taking risks, by pushing the art form forward, and by creating opportunities for the next generation. The annual Fall Fashion Gala has become part of that enduring legacy. First launched in 2012, the seeds for the event were planted two years before when Lincoln Center, home to New York City Ballet since 1964, began hosting New York Fashion Week. With so much creativity and experimentation right on our doorstep, we decided to harness it, and the idea of regularly inviting designers of high fashion into City Ballet was born. Over the years, the designers, drawing inspiration from NYCB’s unparalleled history of artistic excellence, have wowed us with beauty and elegance. They’ve captured our imagination through their ability to tell stories with their costumes. And, once in a while, they break the mold wide open, completely redefining what a ballet costume can be. But the innovation isn’t limited to the costumes. Since its inception the Fall Fashion Gala has presented 28 world premiere ballets by some of the dance world’s most renowned choreographers, as well as exciting newcomers looking to make their mark. Each year the great reward is being in the audience on the night of the Fall Fashion Gala to see these singular creations come to life, to feel the meaning and hear the echo of Balanchine’s edict that “there is only now.”

– SARAH JESSICA PARKER A Vice Chair of the New York City Ballet Board of Directors, Sarah Jessica Parker conceived the Company’s Fall Fashion Gala in 2012.

NEW YORK CITY BALLET CHOREOGRAPHY & COUTURE, BY NYCB DIRECTOR OF COSTUMES MARC HAPPEL WITH PHOTOGRAPHY BY PARI DUKOVIC , SHOWCASES THE NEARLY 30 DESIGNER AND CHOREOGRAPHER COLLABORATIONS THAT HAVE PREMIERED AT THE FALL FASHION GALA, AS WELL AS THE IMPECCABLE CRAFTSMANSHIP OF THE NYCB COSTUME SHOP WHICH HAS EXECUTED THESE COUTURE STAGE DESIGNS OVER THE LAST TEN YEARS. NEW YORK CITY BALLET: CHOREOGRAPHY & COUTURE BY MARC HAPPEL © NEW YORK CITY BALLET, 2023

@ WESTONMAGAZINES 17

OPPOSITE: MIMI STAKER IN GARETH PUGH

TOP-BOTTOM: INDIA BRADLEY AND ALEC KNIGHT IN IRIS VAN HERPEN HUMBERTO LEON OF OPENING CEREMONY AND KENZO OPPOSITE, TOP-BOTTOM: NEW YORK CITY BALLET’S 2022 FALL GALA PHOTO BY SEAN ZANNI MIMI STAKER IN SARAH BURTON FOR ALEXANDER MCQUEEN

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New York City Ballet’s Fall Fashion Gala THURSDAY, OCTOBER 05, 2023 7:00 PM

This October, New York City Ballet’s 2023 Fall Gala will celebrate its 75th Anniversary with a program honoring Co-Founding choreographers George Balanchine and Jerome Robbins, fashion, and New York City. The Gala program will feature Robbins’ Glass Pieces and excerpts from Balanchine’s Who Cares? featuring new costumes designed by Wes Gordon for Carolina Herrera. The celebration will begin at 5:30 PM with a cocktail reception followed by the performance at 7 PM and will conclude with an elegant evening of dinner and dancing on the Theater’s Promenade. The 75th Anniversary Fall Gala is generously sponsored by Vacheron Constantin , with additional support from The Macallan . For more information about the Fall Gala: NYCBallet.com

@ WESTONMAGAZINES 19

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On Friday, the street fair gets underway. The highlight is Congress of Authors, with more than 450 authors reading and discussing their work.

THE 2023 EVENING WITH SERIES FEATURES KERRY WASHINGTON / SUNDAY, NOV. 12 JOAN BAEZ / SUNDAY, NOV. 12 HENRY WINKLER / FRIDAY, NOV. 17 JADA PINKETT SMITH / SUNDAY, NOV. 12

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- SINCE RETIRING FROM ACTIVE PERFORMING, BAEZ HAS FOCUSED HER FORMIDABLE TALENTS ON PAINTING AND DRAWING. AM I PRETTY WHEN I FLY?: AN ALBUM OF UPSIDE DOWN DRAWINGS IS A COLLECTION OF LOVINGLY LOOSE AND CHARMING SKETCHES ON RECURRING THEMES SUCH AS POLITICS, RELATIONSHIPS, WOMEN, ANIMALS, AND FAMILY.

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I n New York City, space is at a premium. So, if you turn onto Cortland Alley off Canal Street, graffiti sprawled across the walls, don’t be sur- prised to find a cultural gem nestled inside an old freight elevator. Meet Mmuseumm, the inconspicuous and most intriguing natural history museum. Instead of looking at a small space as a limitation, Alex Kalman, who runs Mmuseumm, relishes “that notion of not abandoning small spaces, but using them.” How do you create a force of creativity within an over- whelmingly small space? The experience is designed “so you can take every- thing in as the entire universe of stories and collections while also being able to zoom into a particular collection or a particular object.” Even when the museum is closed, eager visitors can peep through the viewing windows to get a glimpse of the current exhibit. Objects featured at Mmuseumm encourage discourse about how different items, whether mass-produced or created by individuals, interact with the nat- ural world. “Mmuseumm normally deals with the material world and things that are manufactured in society,” Kalman added. Past exhibits have featured items related to tragedy, such as reproductions of items found in the pockets of Mmuseumm BY CARLY SILVER

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individuals—mostly people of color—murdered by police. There have been some more light-hearted pieces, too, such as a shoe that might have been the one thrown at George W. Bush (Kalman will neither confirm nor deny its identity.) Kalman elaborated, “Well, we want everything, whether it’s, quote-un-

“something that is more complex than a traditional narrative structure can contain,” adding, “I think there’s always that love of these different languages while also trying to experiment. I often think we follow some rules so that we can break others.” *

quote ‘high’ or ‘low,’ to be presented with the same value and to be pre- sented as though it’s the Queen’s jew- els, that it’s really saying, ‘This is important. This is worth looking at.’ The design of presentation, the context obviously can direct people towards that understanding.” It’s a curation of contrasts (or are they?) that really makes you think. For Mmuseumm’s first new exhibi- tion since the pandemic, Kalman went back to basics in some ways. “We’re starting in the beginning with the cos- mic elements coming together to cre- ate everything,” Kalman explained. “Then we’re making our way through time to pass by the modern world and move into the future and to the end of time.” He’s chosen to focus on ele- ments, the pieces of matter that are the building blocks of everything. Kal- man mused, “It’s thinking about major themes and big ideas and things that all of us around the world are affected by to some degree or another, or feel- ing or dealing with, and then thinking about those themes and finding the stories that represent those themes, and then finding the objects that rep- resent those stories.”

The exhibit touches on abstracts like air and earth. But even these seemingly straightforward ideas are subverted, making a commentary on the state of the world. Bottles of air contain samples from cities with some of the highest air pollution in the world, while soil samples hail from a Mexican river that’s since dried out or a Kenyan valley whose ancient ways of life have been upended by climate change. Other elements featured include those you wouldn’t spy on the peri- odic table. A slew of cornflakes—which are indexed by so-called “corn- flake collectors”—appear on the shelves alongside objects labeled “Ukraine.” Objects relating to the violent war in Ukraine, like Ukrainian water in a bottle, rubble, and ash, ground the visitor in a grim reality. Viewing a Mmuseum exhibit means you never know what’s going to come next, but there are always subtle, intriguing connections underlying the entire experience. In putting his exhibits together, Kalman aims to expand beyond the typical definition of narrative. In doing so, he explained he strives for

Carly Silver is a writer and editor living and working in Brooklyn, New York. Her work has appeared in dozens of publications, including BBC News , The Atlantic , and Smithsonian , among others.

Mmuseumm’s current exhibit runs through November 2023. Entry is free. 4 Cortlandt Alley NYC Public Hours : Fridays –Sundays 11am - 6pm Viewable 24/7 through the viewing windows Private visits by appointment Visit Mmuseumm.com

@ WESTONMAGAZINES 25

FICTION

THE GUEST BY EMMA CLINE

T

his was August. The ocean was warm, and warmer every day. Alex waited for a set to finish before making her way into the water, slogging through until it was deep enough to dive. A bout of strong swim- ming and she was out, beyond the break. The surface was calm. From here, the sand was immaculate. The light—the famous light— made it all look honeyed and mild: the dark European green of the scrub trees, the dune grasses that moved in whispery unison. The cars in the parking lot. Even the seagulls swarming a trash can. On the shore, the towels were occupied by placid beachgoers. A man tanned to the color of expensive luggage let out a yawn, a young mother watched her children run back and forth to the waterline. What would they see if they looked at Alex? In the water, she was just like everyone else. Nothing strange about a young woman, swimming alone. No way to tell whether she belonged here or didn’t. When Simon had first taken her to the beach, he’d kicked off his shoes at the entrance. Everyone did, apparently: there were shoes and sandals piled up by the low wood railing. No one takes them? Alex asked. Simon raised his eyebrows. Who would take someone’s shoes? But that had been Alex’s immediate thought—how easy it would be to take things, out here. All sorts of things. The bikes leaning against the fence. The bags unattended on towels. The cars left unlocked, no one wanting to carry their keys on the beach. A system that ex- isted only because everyone believed they were among people like themselves. Before Alex left for the beach, she had swallowed one of Simon’s painkillers, a leftover from a long-ago back surgery, and already the familiar mental gauze had descended, the surrounding salt water another narcotic. Her heart beat pleasantly, noticeably, in her chest. Why did being in the ocean make you feel like such a good human? She floated on her back, her body moving a little in the push and pull, her eyes closed against the sun. There was a party tonight, hosted by one of Simon’s friends. Or a business friend—

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all his friends were business friends. Until then, hours to waste. Simon would be working the rest of the day, Alex left to her own devices, as she had been ever since they’d come out here—almost two weeks now. She hadn’t minded. She’d gone to the beach nearly every day. Worked through Simon’s pain- killer stash at a steady but undetectable pace, or so she hoped. And ignored Dom’s increasingly unhinged texts, which was

good at seeing things clearly? Time to change course. She swam parallel to the shore. Her body took over, remembering the strokes. She didn’t allow for any hesitation. At some point, the water started resisting her with less force, and then she was moving along, getting closer to shore, and then close enough that her feet touched the sand. She was out of breath, yes. Her arms were sore, her heart- beat juddered out of sync. She was much farther down the beach. But fine—she was fine. The fear was already forgotten.

No one on the shore noticed her, or looked twice. A couple walked past, heads bent, studying the sand for shells. A man in waders assembled a fishing pole. Laughter floated over from a group under a sun tent. Surely, if Alex had been in any real danger, someone would have reacted, one of these people would have stepped in to help. Simon’s car was fun to drive. Frighteningly re- sponsive, frighteningly fast. Alex hadn’t bothered to change out of her swimsuit, and the leather up- holstery cooked her thighs. Even at a good speed, the car windows down, the air was thick and

WHAT WOULD THEY SEE IF THEY LOOKED AT ALEX? IN THE WATER, SHE WAS JUST LIKE EVERYONE ELSE .

easy enough to do. He had no idea where she was. She tried blocking his number, but he got through with new ones. She would change her number as soon as she got the chance. Dom had sent another jag that morning:

warm. What problem did Alex need to solve at this moment? Nothing. No variables to calculate, the painkiller still doing its good work. Compared to the city, this was heaven. * Emma Cline is the New York Times bestselling author of The Girls and the story collection Daddy . The Girls was a final- ist for the Center for Fiction’s First Novel Prize, the National Book Critics Circle’s John Leonard Prize, and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. It was a New York Times Editors’ Choice and the winner of the Shirley Jackson Award. Cline’s stories have been published in The New Yorker, Granta , The Paris Review , and The Best American Short Stories . She received the Plimpton Prize from The Paris Review and an O. Henry Award, and was chosen as one of Granta’ s Best Young American Novelists.

Alex Alex Answer me

Even if the texts still caused a lurch in her stomach, she had only to look up from the phone and it all seemed manageable. She was in Simon’s house, the windows open onto pure green. Dom was in another sphere, one she could pretend no longer quite existed. Still floating on her back, Alex opened her eyes, disoriented by the quick hit of sun. She righted herself with a glance at the shore: she was farther out than she’d imagined. Much farther. How had that happened? She tried to head back in, toward the beach, but she wasn’t seeming to get anywhere, her strokes eaten up by the water. She took a breath, tried again. Her legs kicked hard. Her arms churned. It was impossible to gauge whether the shore was getting any closer. Another attempt to head straight back in, more useless swimming. The sun kept beating down, the ho- rizon line wavered: it was all utterly indifferent. The end—here it was. This was punishment, she was certain of it. Strange, though, how this terror didn’t last. It only passed through her, appearing and disappearing almost instantly. Something else took its place, a kind of reptile curiosity. She considered the distance, considered her heart rate, made a calm assessment of the elements in play. Hadn’t she always been

FROM THE BOOK THE GUEST BY EMMA CLINE. COPYRIGHT © 2023 BY EMMA CLINE. PUBLISHED BY RANDOM HOUSE, AN IMPRINT AND DIVISION OF PENGUIN RANDOM HOUSE LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

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Rodney Smith A LEAP OF FAITH

Paul Martineau, with contributions by Rebecca A. Senf and Leslie Smolan, and an introduction by Graydon Carter Featuring more than two hundred stylish, witty, and sophisticated images, this lavish volume is a celebration of the life and work of fashion photographer Rodney Smith. “Rodney’s images are at once timeless and startlingly fresh.” —Graydon Carter with Nathan King, AIR MAIL “Quietly stunning.” —Max Hirshfeld, Blind Magazine “The definitive record of the life’s work of this truly original artist and educator.” —The Eye of Photography “A well-rounded look at Smith’s creative and technical genius.” —Jessica Stewart, My Modern Met

Getty Publications getty.edu/publications

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TH I R D E Y E

RODNEY SMITH A LEAP OF FAITH

OVER THE COURSE OF A SUCCESSFUL CAREER THAT LASTED MORE THAN FORTY-FIVE YEARS, (RODNEY) SMITH, WHO WAS BEST KNOWN FOR HIS EXCEPTIONAL FASHION PHOTOGRAPHS, DEVELOPED A UNIQUE PHOTOGRAPHIC VISION, ONE THAT IS BEAUTIFUL, ORDERED, AND INHABITED BY WELL-DRESSED LADIES AND GENTLEMEN. IN EACH OF HIS CAREFULLY CRAFTED COMPOSITIONS, HE BANISHED THE CHAOS OF MODERN LIFE, OFFERING AN ALTERNATIVE GROUNDED IN A ROMANTIC VIEW OF THE PAST. LIKE LEWIS CARROLL’S ALICE IN WONDERLAND , HIS PHOTOGRAPHS LEAD US DOWN THE RABBIT HOLE TO A FANTASTICAL PLACE THAT IS JUST BEYOND OUR REACH BUT ONE INTENDED TO INSPIRE US TO BE BETTER VERSIONS OF OURSELVES.

– PAUL MARTINEAU, CURATOR OF PHOTOGRAPHS AT THE J. PAUL GETTY MUSEUM.

EXCERPTS AND PHOTOGRAPHS FROM RODNEY SMITH: A LEAP OF FAITH BY PAUL MARTINEAU, WITH CONTRIBUTIONS BY REBECCA A. SENF AND LESLIE SMOLAN, AND AN INTRODUCTION BY GRAYDON CARTER © 2023 J. PAUL GETTY TRUST. USED WITH PERMISSION.

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THERE IS SOMETHING BOTH AGELESS AND COMPLETELY MODERN IN THE CRISP SYMMETRY OF HIS PHOTOGRAPHS. IF I HAD TO QUANTIFY THE LOOK, I MIGHT DO IT THIS WAY: WES ANDERSON + RENÉ MAGRITTE ÷ FEDERICO FELLINI – IRVING PENN = RODNEY SMITH –GRAYDON CARTER

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TALK OF THE TOWN

Welcome to The William Vale, an invitation to Williamsburg- the best of Brooklyn.

Williamsburg is so happening it’s become a brand, the destination for the discerning and savvy to explore cutting-edge stores, from fashion-forward to vintage. It’s no surprise that Gucci and Chanel are claiming their piece of Williamsburg later this year. The restau- rant scene is thrilling, hundreds of restaurants with every imaginable cuisine. The William Vale is a dog-friendly resort hotel- 183 guest rooms & suites-each with a private balcony and sweeping views of Brooklyn and the New York City skyline. The summer highlight is Vale Pool, the longest outdoor hotel pool in Brooklyn. Westlight is the hotel’s rooftop cocktail bar on the 22nd floor serving a fabulous menu of international small plates. Without question, this is the ultimate Williamsburg experience-teaming with people celebrating the view and the scene. The Turf Club on the 23rd floor is an amazing lawn-covered rooftop just up the stairs from Westlight. This is my favorite spot for cocktails, a fun street food menu and lawn games with a 360° degree view. Summertime, The Turf Club hosts Vale Cinema’s monthly outdoor movies. In winter, the lawn cover transforms into a rooftop skating rink surrounded by winter chalets serving cocktails and fondue. Then there’s Vail Park - a 15,000 square foot elevated green space for VALE (mini) GOLF, yoga and Pilates classes with areas to picnic and enjoy a quiet time outdoors. Leuca is Chef Andrew Carmellini’s restaurant at The William Vale, serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner in a handsome 3-room restaurant and the outdoor pi- azza. The menu is Southern Italian casual with wood- fired pizzas and homemade pastas and jazz nights every Tuesday and Thursday. There’s so much to experience at The William Vale; the hotel has a monthly calendar of cultural and creative programs and workshops- Saatchi Digital Art exhibits, floral bouquet workshop, sound meditation, salsa in the courtyard, and bicycles to ride to Domino Park. Take a few minutes to talk to the concierge staff to curate your experience; they’re Williamsburg savants! 111 North 12th Street Williamsburg, Brooklyn

THE WILLIAM VALE WILLIAMSBURG, BROOKLYN I t’s a magical experience (and a bit bizarre), taking in the panoramic view of Manhattan, Queens and Brooklyn from your luxury soaking tub at The William Vale hotel. It’s just you and the boroughs. The Manhattan skyline belongs to you; a nod to the FDR which is moving along nicely. The BQE…(audible sigh) bumper to bumper. It’s all yours-the wrap-around balcony with outdoor furniture just for your suite. You have to remind yourself periodically that no other hotel guests can walk by for a panoramic view of you in the soaking tub.

The William Vale @TheWilliamVale

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It may seem like just a flight, but it is far more than that. Each journey is the culmination of careful planning, flawless execution, and an unbridled passion to provide the best in world-class customer service. It is in each friendly handshake with the industry’s best pilots and it is in the calm that takes over as you settle into your seat aboard a perfectly appointed aircraft, all Owned and Operated by NICHOLAS AIR. From the personalized attention to our commitment to providing the highest quality aircraft to the Most Refined Set of Private Flyers, the NICHOLAS AIR team is solely focused on one mission--- yours. Choose from one of our flexible and cost effective Jet Card programs and leave the rest to us.

WATCH

NicholasAir.com • 866.935.7771 #NicholasAir All aircraft are Owned and Operated by NICHOLAS AIR. NICHOLAS AIR and INNOVATIVE PRIVATE AIR TRAVEL are registered trademarks ®2023 NICHOLAS AIR. All rights reserved.

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TRAVEL BOOK

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DEPARTURE LOUNGE

DUKES LONDON DUKES LONDON, A MEMBER OF SMALL LUXURY HOTELS OF THE WORLD IS AN HISTORIC JEWEL THAT HAS HELD COURT IN ST. JAMES MAYFAIR FOR OVER 100 YEARS. HIDDEN AWAY ON ST. JAMES PLACE, THE HOTEL IS RENOWNED FOR ITS FIVE STAR EXPERIENCE. A LOVELY STAFF WELCOMES YOU TO YOUR LONDON HOME THAT JUST SO HAPPENS TO BE AROUND THE BEND FROM BUCKINGHAM PALACE. THE ATMOSPHERE IS REFINED BUT NOT FORMAL; ELEGANT YET RELAXED.

Dukes London invites your family to explore London with a new Family Tradition Package. The hotel offers a variety of con- necting bedrooms accommodating up to 4 guests. Dukesy, a tiny toy dachshund in each room awaits your family’s arrival along with a personalized monogrammed bathrobe for each child. Tee- pee tents can be erected and extra beds are available at no charge. All family bedrooms have YOTO players - child-friendly night- lights that also read out loud to young guests from adventures to fairy tales. A dedicated concierge team can book experiences, private tours, and access to attractions so that families can simply enjoy

the experience. A pre-arrival questionnaire guides the hotel team to curate welcome amenities for every family, and a child- friendly afternoon tea is served in-room on arrival. The package also offers book vouchers to redeem at Hatchard’s, the UK’s old- est bookshop, and a range of kid-friendly picnics to enjoy in nearby Green Park or St James’s Park. It’s time to take the dog out! DUKES has designed a special scavenger hunt around London, “The Great DUKES Adven- ture” with DUKESY the toy dog. Kids bring Dukesy along on the hunt, following a map to solve clues, and marking each secret spot as it’s discovered - from Shakespeare’s Globe to the

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Tower of London, Tate Modern, The Shard, or the Imperial War Museum. There’s an activity book with a map, crayons, and stickers for each child and once the hunt is complete, there’s a special prize waiting for each family back at the hotel concierge desk. The new DUKES Family Tradition package includes compli- mentary breakfast for the whole family. For breakfast, lunch, or dinner children under 12 eat for free from the kids menu at the hotel’s Great British Restaurant, or GBR. Each menu item at GBR and the Afternoon Tea menu is identified with symbols for food sensitivities. Families with food allergies will be so ap- preciative of the hotel staff’s heightened awareness of possible food sensitivities. Parents, it’s cocktail time and you don’t have to leave the hotel to experience London’s renowned martini bar. Dukes’ martinis are legendary and bar manager, Alessandro Palazzi is the master of the martini. Each cocktail is prepared table-side as perfor- mance art from a 1908 wooden trolley cart laden with bottles of frozen gin, vodka, and Dukes’ specially prepared Vermouth with all-English ingredients and organic Amalfi lemons. Dukes was a favorite spot of James Bond author, Ian Fleming, the inspiration for the phrase “Shaken, not stirred.” A toast to Dukes London, bring the family and create a London memory! –DEBBIE SILVER

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MONTREAL MOMENTS

I f Montreal were a person, this city would be a true social butterfly, so charismatic and charming. Featuring a year- round calendar of fabulous festivals, dining hotspots, and cul- tural happenings, Montreal is a place you’ll want to get to know, no matter the season. Fall in love this fall when Pop Montréal International Music Fes- tival takes over the city’s stages, from major venues to holes in the wall, from September 27 through October 1. Film buffs fans, plan your Montreal visit from October 4 to 15, just in time for the 52nd International Festival du Nouveau Cinéma . Fall exhibitions at the city’s galleries and museums include photography that transcends the

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expected during Le Mois de la Photo . And leaf-peepers won’t believe their eyes at the autumn colors on display at Mont-Royal Park and Parc Jean-Drapeau . Settle into downtown Montreal at the Warwick Le Crystal - Montréal . Formerly known as the Hotel Le Crystal, and still char- acterized by a glorious, glittering chandelier in the lobby, the hotel has achieved new life since being acquired by Warwick Hotels and Resorts. Choose from one of 131 stunning suites, each of which has kitchenettes, flat-screen TVs, and plush, king-sized beds. Take care of business in an ergonomically designed work- space, with big windows letting in tons of natural light. Unwind with a dip in the indoor saltwater pool, soak up stunning city views from the terrace hot tub, or get pampered with a treatment at the in-house spa, Elements Maison De Beauté . Nearby is Yoko Luna , which puts the “club” in “supper club.” A

WARWICK LE CRYSTAL HOTEL © PASCAL PROULX

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DJ booth acts as the hub of this red-hot eatery, and an expert spins the wheels of steel while eager diners enjoy top-rate Japanese fusion dishes. Miso Rockefeller oysters offer a tangy, delicate bite, and dipping lightly-grilled wagyu beef in ponzu sauce and salt titillates the taste- buds. Wagyu ravioli offers a clever take on dumplings, and the bestselling tender ses- ame beef ribs are a must! Check out the latest fashion and life- style trends at Holt Renfrew, Canada’s ex- clusive retailer. The in-house eatery is worth a visit for lunch: Café Holt offers de- lectable takes on contemporary Canadian classics. Savor the smoked salmon tartine on sourdough, topped with roasted garlic cream cheese, lemon confit with a green onion emulsion, capers, radish, and dill. Catch up on culture by paying a visit to the city’s museums. The recent exhibit Por- table Universe: Thought and Splendour of Indigenous Colombia at the Montreal Mu- seum of Fine Arts (MMFA) . highlighted culture, history, and beliefs among the In- digenous people of Colombia in nearly 400 stunning objects. The Pop of Life!, on exhibition until March 2024 showcases rarely-seen works of pop art from deep within the MMFA’s vast collection. Ancient history lovers won’t want to leave the Montréal Archaeology and His- tory Complex at Pointe-à-Callière . World- class objects from 3,000 years of Egyptian history center Egypt: Three Millennia on the Nile (through October

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15), while permanent exhibitions on the Indigenous and colonial origins of Mon- treal illuminate a city’s self-awareness of its complex origins. Before heading out on the town or sim- ply strolling along the boulevards, sample global cuisine at Time Out Market. Span- ning 40,000 square feet, this market serves up dishes from some of the city’s culinary stars. Try Chef Paul Toussaint’s Haitian- meets-Canadian cuisine at his eponymous eatery (the amazing pineapple-and-rum ribs are a must!), or enjoy a succulent piece of Portuguese chicken at the Ferreira fam- ily’s Campo. Don’t miss the Soda Bar’s arti- sanal mocktails! Montreal’s global cuisine scene is on dis- play at Le Central - a year-round gourmet festival showcasing restaurants from up- and-coming and established chefs alike. Ho

RESTAURANT YOKO LUNA

Lee Chix serves up the crunchiest fried chicken north of the border, along with a selection of Chinese sauces, Mapo tofu, and fried rice. You’ll swear you’ve landed in Naples when eating pizza from Heirloom; they cook their pies in an oven imported from Bologna, and their classic Margherita pizza is on par with any slice you’ll have elsewhere. It’s never too early to think about next summer’s vacation. July is the annual Just for Laughs festival , a true celebration of comedy. JFL offers a wide array of performers, all of whom are guaran- teed to have you bent over in gut-busting laughter. Standouts from 2023 included some of Britain’s best comics, ranging from the dazzlingly absurd stylings of Eddie Izzard (also known as Suzy Izzard) and the quick wit of Gina Yashere to the feminist musings of Josie Long and laddish quips of Jack Whitehall. No matter the time of year, Montreal is a destination worth exploring. Plan your visit at mtl.org/en IG: @Montreal #mtlmoments –CARLY SILVER

DALE CHIHULY © EVA BLUE

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SLOPESIDE ANOTHER EPIC SEASON ON THE WAY

THE ARRABELLE AT VAIL SQUARE

The equipment will be delivered to where you’re staying at the resort or you can arrange for slope-side pick-up and drop-off; no more hauling gear to and from the resort. Just select your favor- ite equipment and where you’d like it delivered each day. There’s a $50 per day rental charge, con- siderably less than high-end equipment rentals, not to mention the incredible convenience. The available gear will cover all ability levels from be- ginner to expert as well as all terrain types from groomers to powder. A limited number of Epic Pass holders will have the opportunity to pilot My Epic Gear this coming season at Vail, Beaver Creek, Brecken- ridge, and Keystone. The program will officially launch for the 2024/2025 season at Vail, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge, Keystone, Whistler Black- comb, Park City Mountain, Crested Butte,

V ail Resorts has done it again. The ski industry leader, with 36 owned or operated resorts worldwide, is blaz- ing the way for skiers and riders with two new innova- tive programs for the upcoming ski season. First, the wildly popular multi-resort Epic Pass ® will be even easier to access with My Epic App . Your mobile phone is your new ski pass; no more removing gloves and fumbling through jacket pockets. Just click into your skis or snowboard, open your app, and away you go. My Epic App also allows you to use your pass as a resort charge and get real-time grooming reports, weather updates, personalized stats, lift line status, and interactive trail maps to help you navigate the mountain like a pro. If you previously used the Epic Mix App, be sure your noti- fications are turned on and the transition will be seamless. for the entire season. Members select their favorite gear for the season from 15 brands of the latest ski and snowboard models at each participating resort. You’ll receive expertly tuned equip- ment and high-quality custom boot-fitting. Members can also request specialized gear to suit changing weather conditions and terrain, subject to availability. Next is the introduction of My Epic Gear , a truly exciting new membership program. A $50 fee unlocks the benefits

Heavenly, Northstar, Stowe, Okemo, and Mount Snow. Vail Resorts is once again leading the way in the ski industry. Visit Vail Resorts for more info about the Epic programs and passes and to plan your Vail Resorts ski vacation. –RICH SILVER

BEAVER CREEK PHOTO BY JOHN RESNICK

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