Heartland Investment Partners - April 2020

STARS & STRIPES

HEARTLAND INVESTMENT COMPANIES

APRIL 2020

DARINGARMAN.COM 319-350-5378

On Monday, April 20, roughly 31,500 people will leave in waves from the starting line of the Boston Marathon. They’ll spend the next few hours running down city sidewalks, climbing hills, and navigating descents. It might be pouring rain, like it was in 2018, or it might be an apocalyptic 89 degrees like it was in 2012. Rain or shine, I’ve heard it’s an incredibly difficult course to pull off. I don’t spend much time thinking about marathons these days, but once upon a time, I was one of those runners lined up to kick my own butt. I didn’t run the Boston Marathon, but I did run the Chicago Marathon — twice. If you didn’t know me 20 years ago, that might surprise you. I hung up my running shoes in my early 40s, but running was a big part of my life back then. In my late 20s, a cardiac scare got me hooked on the sport. The event turned out to be nothing — just a combination of too much caffeine and too much stress — but it still scared me enough for a trip to the emergency room. The doctors told me I should probably quit drinking seven Diet Cokes a day, get some sleep, and try to relax (shocking), but I decided to get in better shape, too, and thought running would be a good way to do it. At first, I took the “walk a block, run a block” approach. Eventually, I started doing a little more running then walking, and after a while, I thought, “Hey, why not try a 5K?” I still remember that first race vividly: It was the Marion Turkey Trot, and I was so nervous. Considering I went on to run a 10K, then 15 or 20 half-marathons, and then two marathons, those nerves seem silly to me now. But back then, it felt like a huge moment. Funnily enough, my biggest takeaway from the Turkey Trot was this: You know you aren’t in great shape when, about 200 yards from the finish line, an older woman with her kid in a stroller jogs right by you and beats you to it. Still, I did finish the race! WHY I STARTED (THEN STOPPED) RUNNING MARATHONS THE MAKING OF A MARATHONER

of making it through those 26.2 miles, and I was completely hooked on running. In fact, I’d probably still be going on morning runs today if my Achilles tendon hadn’t gotten in the way. If I got into running with a bang, I went out with a whimper. One day, about a mile into one of my regular morning runs, I got a sharp pain in the middle of my left calf that shot down into the arch of my foot. When I eventually went to see a doctor about it, they told me that, over my decade of running, enough scar tissue had built up around an old Achilles tendon injury that I’d either need to quit running or have surgery. I decided I didn’t want to keep running that badly . Now, I still do some kind of workout every day. I’m a big Beach Body guy, so more often than not, I’ll stream one of those workouts on my phone in the morning, lift some weights, or do cardio. Over the years, I’ve found that what I do is less important than that I do something . Working out is really all about having the discipline to do something you don’t feel like doing, because you know you’ll be better off after you do it. I think that applies to work, too. Getting through a tough day of meetings is a heck of a lot like dragging yourself out of bed and pulling on four layers for a morning run in the dead of winter. Luckily, as an entrepreneur, I bring the same level of dedication to both. If you’ve got a tough investment question or a challenging proposition, I’m your guy.

–Darin Garman

It took me about four years to work up to running my first marathon and another three to cross a second one off my list. I was really proud

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READY TO TAKE UP THE NOMADIC LIFESTYLE AFTER RETIREMENT?

HERE’S HOW TO PLAN FOR IT

DO YOUR RESEARCH If you have a specific place in mind for your retirement, like Hawaii or Texas, look at rental costs and other lifestyle changes that can affect your budget. For example, Hawaii’s cost of living is cheaper than other popular retirement states, like Florida, but basic commodities may be more expensive. If a boat or RV is more your style, be sure to add repair and fuel costs into your budget.

You’ve worked hard for years to arrive at this moment: retirement. Now that you’re free of your 9-to-5 job, you have a lot more time for activities you enjoy. That extra time is what leads many people to turn to a nomadic lifestyle after retirement. Touring in an RV, sailing around the world, or even just retiring to a cabin in a remote locale are all popular options for new retirees. If the spirit of adventure is calling you, here are some financial tips to set you on the right path. DOWNSIZE BEFORE YOU GO Some folks choose to sell their home and use the income to fund their travels, staying in apartments and rentals as they go. If that seems too drastic, downsizing to a smaller home is also a good option, especially if you plan to travel in intervals but want a home base to return to. This also gives you the option of renting your home while you’re away and using the money to continue traveling. ASK OTHER NOMADS Crowdsource advice from friends and family members who’ve taken the leap. Lots of other people have shared your dream and made it a reality. Many have turned their experience into books or blogs, like Lynne Martin, who’s been traveling around the world with her husband, Tim, for the last three years. The Martins used the sale of their home to finance their travels. They also take cruises to cut down on travel costs and often dine in to save money.

As you go about researching and planning, be sure to consult with your financial advisor so they can help you look at your current situation and make adjustments. With the proper planning, you’ll be living your nomadic dream in no time.

APRIL SHOWERS BRING RETIREMENT INVESTORS

WHY IRA AND 401(K) REAL ESTATE INVESTING HEATS UP IN THE SPRING

2. DEMAND FROM TENANTS AND INVESTORS IS

Every spring like clockwork, we see a rise in the number of our partners and clients who invest all or part of their retirement funds in Iowa properties. On the surface, the fact that so many men and women are pouring their IRAs and/or 401(k)s into heartland apartment communities might seem surprising, but over our time in this business, we’ve uncovered a compelling reason for the trend. The first reason is this season is based around looking forward. Spring- cleaning, growth, and renewal are big themes this time of year, and those ideas spur investors to look toward their financial futures in the rest of 2020 and beyond. What they see often inspires them to move their money from conventional retirement accounts into apartment communities in the heartland. From our perspective, that inspiration breaks down into three categories. 1. SHIFTING THE FUNDS IS EASY. The process of investing an IRA into an apartment community sounds like it would be fraught with confusion and complex paperwork, but it’s actually easier than most people think. Not only that, but the costs are negligible, too. Most investors find the entire process can be completed in less than two weeks with minimal paperwork or information required.

ON THE RISE. It’s no secret that demand is high, and most investors know intuitively that it’s likely to keep climbing. Investors can capitalize on this trend and earn both tax-deferred income from rent and tax-deferred profits from eventual sales.

3. THERE’S NO DRAMA IN THE HEARTLAND. Heartland apartment communities are typically immune from economic, political, and social drama and continue to chug along month after month, year after year. That makes them a safe retirement plan!

If you ever have any questions about how this profitable process could work for you, don’t hesitate to reach out to Darin. He’d love to help you get started!

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I WA LIFE

SUDOKU

CALLING ALL GARDENERS! SEED SAVERS IS WAITING FOR YOU

Way up in the northeast corner of Iowa, a very special farmhouse is nestled on 890 acres of garden plots, rolling hills, stark bluffs, and rushing rivers. The parcel is called Heritage Farm, and it’s the headquarters of Seed Savers, a national organization that stores, grows, and shares heirloom seeds. Today, the group has more than 20,000 unique varieties of seeds in its library and grows about 1,000 of them on the farm. Every year, visitors from across the world make the pilgrimage to see them, touch, and sometimes even taste them. If you’re a foodie or a gardener, Heritage Farm is a sight to behold. Visitors can wander miles of hiking trails, explore display gardens packed with rare and unusual vegetables, check out the farm’s historic orchards, and shop for seeds and other gardening gear at the Lillian Goldman Visitors Center. Among the farm’s most interesting attractions are its more than 900 varieties of apple trees, many dating back to the 19th century, and its 50 head of rare, wild White Park cattle. Seed Savers was actually founded in Missouri, not Iowa, but Heritage Farm is at the heart of its operation these days. Founders Diane Ott Whealy and Kent Whealy created the group for a specific purpose: to make sure two of Diane’s German grandfathers’ rare and precious plants, a flower dubbed Grandpa Ott’s morning glory and a tomato named the German pink, weren’t lost to history. What started as a small network of avid gardeners bent on seed saving in 1975 has grown into a 13,000-member international collective. The members share seeds through the group’s seed exchange and by shopping its catalog and online store. Heritage Farm welcomes visitors in Decorah, Iowa, from March 1 to Oct. 1, but the Seed Exchange keeps ticking year-round. Anyone is welcome to shop from the online store at SeedSavers.org or share seeds through its programs. If you’re an avid gardener looking to add some unusual flavors to your repertoire this year, Seed Savers can help! Hungarian heart tomatoes, British wonder peas, mammoth Sandwich Island salsify, or Pitmaston pineapple apples might be just what you need to spice up your garden, and your table.

APARTMENT SALES AND SUCCESS

4 PLEX – 2-BEDROOM UNITS SOLD! IN 9 HOURS!

36 PLEX FOR SALE! 1 & 2 BEDROOM

FOR SALE: TWO SIDE-BY-SIDE 6 PLEX 1 & 2 BDM MAINTENANCE-FREE EXTERIORS

CONTACT DARIN TODAY AT 319-350-5378 FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THESE LISTINGS!

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HEARTLAND INVESTMENT COMPANIES

PRST STD US POSTAGE PAID BOISE, ID PERMIT 411

Darin Garman: Heartland’s Most Trusted Multi-Family Investment Advisor 2505 Silver Oak Trail Marion, IA 52302 DarinGarman.com 319-350-5378

INSIDE Page 1

Why I Started (Then Stopped) Running Marathons

Page 2 How to Make the Most of a Nomadic Lifestyle After Retirement

April Showers Bring Retirement Investors

Page 3 Seeds, Cattle, and Apples, Oh My!

Page 4 Are Business Trips Bad for Your Health?

Most people love to travel, but few people enjoy business trips. While that can partially be chalked up to the extra rest and relaxation you might have on a nonwork-related trip, unhealthy habits can make business trips even more draining. If business trips leave you feeling like you need a vacation, you might be making the following mistakes. SKIPPING BREAKFAST On hectic mornings with early meetings, it’s tempting to skip breakfast and just grab some coffee. But if you usually eat breakfast at home, skipping your morning meal can cause you to be a lot hungrier later, which can lead to excess snacking or overeating at lunch. When traveling, stick to your regular eating habits. EATING RESTAURANT SERVING SIZES If you’re eating three restaurant-sized meals a day, you’re going to get more calories than if you were cooking at home. Don’t be afraid to order half- portions or stick to the appetizer menu. You can also ask about ordering meals à la carte — no one needs all those fries with their burger, anyway. These strategies will help you save money and stick to a healthy calorie count. NOT PACKING WORKOUT GEAR Research from the travel risk management company On Call International found that 54% of people say they’re less likely to exercise while on a work trip, but you shouldn’t let fitness take a back seat. Packing workout clothes can serve as a reminder to get some exercise. Get in a good workout by 4 TRAVEL MISTAKES YOU KEEP MAKING BUSINESS TRIPS DON’T HAVE TO BE TERRIBLE

taking advantage of the hotel gym, walking to nearby destinations, or doing some yoga in the hotel room before bed. NOT TAKING SLEEP SERIOUSLY Early morning meetings, late-night networking events, and unfamiliar hotel rooms are a recipe for lost sleep. Lack of sleep puts your body on the fast-track to poor health, so you need to make good sleep a priority. Do your best to maintain your sleep schedule and bedtime routine while traveling. Better yet, check the guest reviews before booking your hotel. Heed complaints about thin walls or uncomfortable beds and find accommodations that support a good sleep environment. You shouldn’t have to dread business trips. Build better travel habits to feel healthier and enjoy every kind of trip you take this year.

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