Fine Art Collector | Autumn 2018

CASTLEFINEART.COM FINE ART COLLECTOR AUTUMN 2018

SAY HELLO TO GEN Z YELLOW

THE GENERATION GAME KAREN HALLER COLOUR PSYCHOLOGIST EXPLAINS ALL

TALK TO THE ANIMALS ROBERT OXLEY

WHAT’S HOT FOR AUTUMN/WINTER 2018 Autumn 2018 RESURGENCE OF ART IN POP CULTURE

A BRUSH WITH STYLE INTERVIEW WITH CHARLOTTE COSBY

吳 靜 茹

WU CHING JU

AVAILABLE NOW Limited Edition Bronze Sculptures

From the

Editor As we move into autumn, with winter not far away, we may be mourning the loss of the long summer evenings and bright blue- skied mornings, but we have much to look forward to from the coming months. As befits the dawning of a new season, we have a plethora of forthcoming launches and releases just waiting to excite, entice and safeguard our endorphin levels against the vitamin D deprivation of the winter months. So, as we mentally prepare for cold snaps and weather chaos aplenty, we must consider how we can make our self-imposed months of near hibernation as palatable as possible. If we’re soon to be cocooned in our homes while winter rages on outside, it’s entirely sensible – nay, imperative – to make our ‘four walls’ as aesthetically pleasing as we can, to stave off cabin fever and keep life colourful. This is where we, and your local galleries, are well placed to help! From brand new artists (read on to discover who, what, where and when!) and their unseen, exciting limited edition and original work, we are proud and delighted to present our Autumn/Winter 2018 collection.

FineArtCollector ispublishedbyWashingtonGreenFineArtGroupLimitedanddistributedbyCastleGalleries. Email art@castlegalleries.com Website castlefineart.com Alltheartfeatured inFineArtCollector isavailable throughCastleGalleriesacrossGreatBritain.Visitourwebsiteat castlefineart.com tofindyournearestgallery. The imagescontainedwithinthis literatureareanartistic representationofthecollection.Tobestexperienceour art,we recommendyoucontactyour localgallerytoarrangeaviewing.Prices illustratedthroughoutthismagazine are recommended retailprices.

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©2018WashingtonGreenFineArtGroupLimited.Printed InEngland

Editor: Daniela Quinlan Contributors: Daniela Quinlan, Michael Perry, Parveen Kauser, Monika Adamska, Charlotte Brazier, Robyn Smith Creative Director: Ak Suggi Designers: Matt Johnson (Lead Designer), Christy Guan, Mikyla Edwards Special Thanks: Charlotte Cosby (Farrow & Ball), Lara Pattison (Farrow & Ball), Capture Birmingham, Decoy Media, Natasha Devon, Andria Zafirakou, Ricky Saiz, Karen Haller, Stephanie Taylor (Malmaison Birmingham), Louise Barnett, The Big Cat Sanctuary, Jonathan Douglas (National Literacy Trust), Meg Lake (Coffee with Meg), Dr Catherine Lester, Acorn Press

On The Cover Robert Oxley

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube and be the first to hear the latest news, events and industry updates! Plus, we’ll keep you inspired with beautiful photography of our art, shots behind the scenes with our artists and live posts from all of our exciting events!

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Lorenzo Quinn Exclusive photography from the modern master’s two UK personal appearances

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CONTENTS

A Brush With Style Exclusive interview with Head of Creative

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Welcome To Our Home Our art, where it belongs – on your walls! 38

for Farrow & Ball, Charlotte Cosby

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New Gallery On The Block Explore our stylish

Say Hello To Gen Z Yellow

new gallery in Cambridge’s Grand Arcade

Karen Haller, leading expert in the field of Applied Colour Psychology, explains all

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58

Summer Exhibition 2018 Read all about the highlights, the winners and what’s still to come…

Talk To The Animals 10 questions with...Robert Oxley

Sotally Tober 70

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Party planning and cocktail making with Peter & Jayne Smith!

The Generation Game Why the resurgence of art in pop culture is a welcome change

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The History Of Art In Homes Mankind’s engagement with art throughout the ages

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What's In A Name? Our brand new website is now a virtual gallery for the world to enjoy!

In Every Issue 1. From The Editor 90. The Studio Sessions 104. The Social Edit 122. In The Frame Throughout In the Gallery

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Learn Your ABC A glossary of the art terms you need to know

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I N T H E GA L L E RY

Former Miss France Pascale has battled sexism, fierce competition in the fashion industry and a terrifying car accident to become one of Europe’s most exciting artists. To mark her debut release, we chatted to the IN:SIGHT 2017 finalist about why she wants to empower women.

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I N T H E G A L L E R Y Pascale Taurua

“We’re no longer confined by an ideal standard of femininity or beauty,” explains Pascale, who lives in Paris, France. “Instead, we can celebrate our true selves through what we wear. Like painting, sculpture or dance, clothes are a way of revealing a vision.” By fusing feminism with razor-sharp observation, Pascale’s figurative pieces challenge gender stereotypes and present fashion as an art of conquest. Shoes are a symbol of sexuality, while sunglasses allow us to shield our secrets from others. Painting on canvas with extra-fine oil, she blocks in her sketch before allowing the piece to choose its own direction. Her studio walls are

adorned with drawings, photographs and images from magazines, which she uses for inspiration. Drawing upon her own hardships, Pascale channels the strength that saw her turn her back on the fashion industry and open her own art school. She says: “ Many traumatic events – including a serious car accident in which my face was severely injured – led me to figurative painting as a form of art therapy. Today, I dare to use a bolder paint and a more deconstructed style. Fashion is one of the most important means of communication and has given me back my power.”

Boyfriend HandFinishedCanvasonBoard Editionof95

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“Mastering my technique has allowed me to achieve equilibrium, not only on the canvas, but within myself.”

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A BRUSH WITH STYLE

[interview with] Charlotte Cosby

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With a nod to the past and eye to the future, Farrow & Ball has reigned supreme across the interior design industry for more than 70 years. The company's passion for pigments, paint and printmaking is unparalleled (well, perhaps by anyone but us!) and we were thrilled to speak to Head of Creative, Charlotte Cosby, to find out more about a brand that features all too often on our home improvement wish list…

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Farrow & Ball New Colours 2018 Bancha No. 298 Modern Emulsion 10 FINE ART COLLECTOR AUTUMN 2018

As Head of Creative for Farrow & Ball, talk us through what a day in the office looks like for you… A typical day for me can involve anything – trialling new designs and colourways in our wallpaper factory, brainstorming creative ideas with my team, overseeing our campaign photoshoots or even travelling to design shows to research new trends. The beauty of my job is that no two days are the same! You’ve been with Farrow & Ball for nearly a decade; what would you say have been the biggest landmark moments and/or catalysts for change during this period? Launching the first wallpaper collection I’d developed (our amazing Art Deco Lotus design) was a brilliant moment for me personally. We also had an absolutely unforgettable year back in 2016, when our book ‘How to Decorate’, written by me and Joa [Studholme], was released. And of course, this year! Our new colours launch has been the biggest and most successful yet and we’ve been completely overwhelmed by the excitement it’s generated in our customers. Farrow & Ball is renowned for incorporating historical colour references into its product range. What research do you do, and what source material do you use, to steer this area of development? Inspiration for colour names and the stories behind them comes from all around us, whether it’s from people who inspire us, our Dorset home or the natural world – but historical houses are one of my personal favourite places to look when dreaming up new colours. Yeabridge Green is a great example: it was named in honour of an 18th-century farmhouse in Yeabridge, Somerset, where the exact paint shade that inspired our green was discovered when an old gun cupboard was removed. Dead Salmon is another great one, and it’s a story that people don’t expect when they first hear the name – it actually refers to the ‘dead’ flat finish described by a painter who’d used a very similar colour in Kedleston Hall in 1805. I’m also very fortunate to be able to travel to lots of amazing places as part of my job. From research trips to America to attending trade shows across Europe, I journey anywhere and everywhere for Farrow & Ball, so I get plenty of inspiration from the historic places I find on my travels.

Being experts in printmaking, we adore your commitment to traditional methods when producing your wallpapers. Can you give our readers an overview of this process? The wallpaper factory is my favourite place at Farrow & Ball’s Head Office! To give you a brief overview, the background colour of the paper is painted with a layer of our environmentally friendly water based paint, which helps to give the papers a sumptuous and tactile texture, and then our patterns are applied either using flatbed block printing, roller block printing or trough printing methods. These traditional methods help to create a wallpaper of great distinction and beauty – something we’re renowned for at Farrow & Ball. The fact that our wallpapers are made using our paints also makes it really easy to match paint and wallpaper in a room and create a scheme with a really cohesive feel.

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Farrow & Ball New Colours 2018 Preference Red No.297 in Estate Emulsion

Image courtesy of Farrow & Ball

Moving into the world of art, what is on your walls at home? I absolutely love collecting art. My favourite pieces are by Charlotte Taylor and Michael Angove. I even have a huge banana leaf which is a 1950s original piece of wallpaper that was taken from a hotel in Miami, from a company called Secondhand Rose. I love this one because it’s got such a quirky story behind it – much like our own colour names! Your profession requires a lot of creativity and an eye for design, do you draw or paint outside of work? Yes I do! For as long as I can remember I’ve had a fascination with colour and design – I especially love coloured graph paper and can often be found drawing pieces of furniture. When I’m not doing that, I love to paint abstract.

Farrow & Ball encourages its clients to share photos of their newly-decorated homes on social media using the hashtag #MyFaBHome much like we do with our clients via #YourWorldOurArt. What does it mean to you to see paints and wallpapers that you’ve designed in the homes of your customers? Nothing quite compares to seeing people enjoying something you’ve created – it’s an amazing feeling. Our customers are a hugely creative bunch and we love seeing how they’ve used a colour or a print in their homes, sometimes in a way we never could have come up with ourselves. The feedback we get on social media from people who’ve either used our paint and paper in their homes and love the effect, or have gone in search of inspiration and find themselves bursting with ideas thanks to our inspirational images, is always fantastic too.

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Image courtesy of Farrow & Ball Inchyra Blue No. 289, Peignoir No.286, Worsted No. 284

Finally, we’d love to know what style your own interior décor at home follows… My home is an eclectic mix of contemporary and modern with a restful colour palette. I spend a lot of time around colour and I’m constantly on the go, so I opted for a really simple palette to create somewhere I could properly unwind. My bedroom is painted Wimborne White which is a really versatile just-off-white (and a great backdrop for the eight-foot-high green banana

leaf print I have on the wall!) The living room is painted in Dix Blue which is extremely calming, and the guest room is a combination of two soft greys: Ammonite and Purbeck Stone. I do have some bolder colours and patterns too, like the Lotus wallpaper that hangs in my hallway. Being a first-floor flat, this covers two floors from the bottom of the stairs and looks really dramatic. For my kitchen, I wanted something a little bolder so opted for rich Stiffkey Blue. My bathroom is also painted in Dix Blue and Pavilion Blue but with the addition of a giant pink Aubdon flamingo on the tiles!

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I N T H E GA L L E RY

R ICHARD ROWAN He may have braved the Icelandic wilderness to capture the Aurora Borealis, but Richard’s latest pieces are a little closer to home. Inspired to help his son see the beauty of the lightning he feared, the artist has depicted the awe-inspiring natural phenomenon. “My fatherly instinct took over and I sat with him to gaze out of the window and show him its beauty,” he says. “Through my art, I study the world that we all take for granted. Created by our planet, these spectacles can inspire us,

challenge our perspective and give us a feeling of deeper connection to early humanity.” Using references such as storm chaser films, Richard painted his glass artworks via his signature reverse technique. The piece was underlit and the bolt scratched out and painted with white, with some areas faded to intensify the sections of the main strike. He jokes: “As I can’t sleep through the lightning strikes, I am better off painting them!”

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Left:InAnInstant GicléePrintonGlass Editionof195 ImageSize13½"x13½" FramedSize24"x24" £595Framed Below:NeverTurnBack GicléePrintonGlass Editionof195 ImageSize13½"x13½" FramedSize24"x24" £595Framed

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I N T H E G A L L E R Y Richard Rowan

“In one split second, the power of nature’s energy is revealed through an instantaneous light source that brings dramatic hues to the sky.”

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MATTHEW HAMPSHIRE

I N T H E GA L L E RY

Since buying his first digital camera in 2000, Matthew has captured some of the world’s most beautiful abandoned places. His photographs impressed our IN:SIGHT 2017 judges, and his debut collection saw him travel to Italy, Germany and France to conjure the lost and forgotten.

HiddenBeauty HighDefinitionCTypePrintonAcrylicPanel Editionof95 ImageSize35½"x23¾" £695

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I N T H E G A L L E R Y Matthew Hampshire

Sundown HighDefinitionCTypePrintonAcrylicPanel Editionof95 ImageSize35"x23" £695

“Making my way through the building and watching for holes in the floors, I was struck by the warm red glow of the sun just starting to disappear and set about capturing it before it was gone.”

During his travels, Matthew captured a disused power plant, a farmhouse full of secrets and even a church formerly occupied by the Nazis in the Second World War. With overgrown vines and crumbling floors no match for his curiosity, we’re excited to see where his photography will take him next.

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SackTheGardener HighDefinitionCTypePrintonAcrylicPanel Editionof95 ImageSize35"x23" £695

ItMayBeBlueButIt'sTheBomb HighDefinitionCTypePrintonAcrylicPanel Editionof95 ImageSize35"x23" £695

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I N T H E GA L L E RY

JON JONES From the smoky streets of Victorian Birmingham appeared the story behind Jon’s art. In collaboration with the West Midlands Police Museum, Jon delved into the history of the infamous Peaky Blinders gang,

made famous by the successful BBC series of the same name. His research took him into the museum’s archives and the murky lives of the criminals who ruled the city through violence, fraud and robbery.

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"I wanted to try and convey the darker side of the Peaky Blinders...the sinister side, the menace. We all love them but they were bad, bad men!"

ThereIsHell,AndThereIs AnotherPlaceBelowHell HandEmbellishedCanvasonBoard Editionof195

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I N T H E GA L L E RY

PAUL KENTON

Whether it’s the buzz of New York’s Times Square or bobbing boats on the Thames in London, Paul has a unique ability to transport viewers into his striking cityscapes. Loose brushwork, paint drips and a vibrant colour palette infuse his pieces with a contemporary energy that is highlighted by his chosen medium of aluminium and – in an exciting first for the artist – gold foil.

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ParisianMetropolis TripleStrikeFlatbedPrintonGoldFoil Editionof195

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“The feeling I get when exploring cities on foot is unlike any other. Shadows move fast and light sources appear and disappear in seconds, giving me moments to record what I see.”

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I N T H E G A L L E R Y Paul Kenton

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WELCOME TO OUR HOME

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Walking into our gallery is as personal to us as you relaxing on our sofa at home, tea and biscuits in hand. Art encompasses everything we do; it’s a lifestyle, not a job. We caught up with our retail designer, Louise Barnett, to find out how she creates artspaces which make our customers and staff feel like a part of the family. Over the last 2 years, our galleries have undergone a major style refresh as we continue to respond to the needs of our collectors. With 36 outlets across the UK, we’re passionate about making each one unique to the city it’s in. From Milton Keynes to Cardiff, Bristol to Sheffield, the vibrancy and heritage of an area weaves itself into every aspect of our design. “It’s an exciting process,” says Louise. “I’m immersed in the project from start to finish, whether it’s visiting new locations or picking fabric samples and sketching ideas. Each gallery is different, but the Castle brand is instantly recognisable. For example, in Manchester we have a bespoke lighting feature, while our Glasgow gallery has tartan accents.” To keep up-to-date with the latest trends, Louise – who has a degree in fine art – regularly visits art markets and university shows. “My own style is quite eclectic,” she laughs. “Decorating a gallery is definitely different to my own home, as our art is always at the forefront of the design. The furniture needs to make you notice the art, not the other way around.”

Working in a creative industry is a dream come true for the busy mum-of-two, who has also managed an art gallery and worked as a PA. Louise joined the company 13 years ago and worked her way up from advising galleries on art trends to leading the design project for our outlet at Birmingham’s Mailbox shopping centre in 2015. “There’s been a lot of learning on the job,” she explains. “You’re given what is essentially a concrete box, which can be a little daunting. But I have a clear vision of what I’d like to achieve, and with the help of the Head of Studio, Ak Suggi, the shopfitting team and facilities manager, we are able to make it happen.

WHAT WERE 2018’S BIGGEST TRENDS?

This year marked the 50th anniversary of NeoCon, the world’s leading commercial design event. Held at theMART in Chicago, it revealed a focus on integrated technology,

sustainability and staff wellbeing. Cutting-edge

technology was paired with old- world craftsmanship, while key materials included glass, metal and foliage.

WHAT WILL BE BIG IN 2019? It’s estimated that we’ll spend up to 30% of our waking life at work, so it’s vital that it’s a happy and inspiring place to be. Commercial design has evolved from the dreary office cubicles of the 1970s to the open-plan, flexible spaces of Generation Z.

“The first six weeks are the most challenging, as you have to come up with ideas and translate them for other people. However, this time is also the most rewarding because you watch your vision come to life. As a team, we face challenges - such as limited lighting or space - together and devise a solution. It’s incredibly fulfilling to see a finished gallery, and no two projects are the same.” With many of our staff formally educated in art, or artists themselves, the creative atmosphere and light, airy spaces are key to their satisfaction and wellbeing. Art consultant Freddie Wells works at our Leeds gallery. He says: “It’s like a second home to me. It’s a blessing to have such an appealing environment to walk into every day, and to be surrounded by our fantastic art.” This passion for the art we publish is what we hope to instil in every customer who walks through our doors. Whether you’re a first-time browser or a seasoned collector, our galleries are designed with your comfort and experience in mind. From plush sofas to private viewing rooms and state-of-the-art audio visual systems, they’re equipped with everything you need to find your perfect piece. “I want everyone to know they are welcome,” says Louise . “Each of our collectors is different, so I design somewhere they can connect with the art on a personal level. When you buy art from our galleries, it’s not a transaction. It’s an experience.”

technologies, for example cultural shifts with the advancements of social media. “The best examples of a modern office actively improve the health of employees through considered use of natural light and layouts which promote movement and collaboration. We’re seeing a much bigger crossover with residential themes and concepts.”

Head of design at AIS Workplace, Simon Hart, told us: “Workplace interior design moves at a rapid pace and tracks the development of new

“If you’ve got an empty space, build your home around your artwork. It will make it even more unique to you.” - Louise

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NEW GALLERY ON THE BLOCK

Behind the ornate lettering of the Grand Arcade shopping centre on Cambridge’s historic St Andrew’s Street is a modern metropolis. With a glass atrium, dedicated cycling park and over 60 retail outlets, it was the perfect location for our state-of-the-art new gallery. Spread over two spacious floors, the modern artspace is our largest outlet to date and boasts a VIP lounge, cutting-edge viewing room and even a bar area. Light and airy, its relaxed atmosphere brings our art to life. “There’s a real ‘home from home’ feel,” explains gallery manager, Stacy Bodkin. “ And there are so many features to explore. Our viewing room has sliding doors and a

separate sound system, while our VIP lounge is painted in the traditional Cambridge Blue.”

Located on the second floor next to John Lewis, the glass-fronted space is accessible via an escalator and lift. With exposed brickwork, a neutral décor and materials sympathetic to the surrounding listed buildings, it’s an exciting mixture of old and new. “The feedback has been fantastic,” says Stacy. “Customers are blown away by the new look, and our art consultants are thrilled to be working in such a beautiful gallery. We’re definitely making a statement – you can’t miss us!”

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"Bright colours are the perfect backdrop for an exciting gallery wall. ‘Drawing Room Blue’ has a clean, graphic feel that is particularly good at bringing out the beauty of each piece of art. Taking the same colour over the ceiling is a brilliant way to keep your eyes drawn to the main attraction."

Charlotte Cosby Head of Creative Farrow & Ball

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I N T H E GA L L E RY

JOHN WI LSON

You may recognise a few familiar artworks in John’s latest release. The master of illusion has taken on art legends Roy Lichtenstein and Salvador Dali for his mind-boggling wall sculptures. “All of my paintings are painted 100% by hand: I don’t use any digital images or tracing. For the full effect of the 3D movement, they are best hung with the centre at eye level.”

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I N T H E G A L L E R Y John Wilson

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COLOUR TRENDS: Say hello to

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According to colour experts at Pantone, 2016 was the year of ‘Rose Quartz’, or ‘Millennial Pink’ as it became more commonly known. From home décor to clothing and curated Instagram feeds, you never had to look far before another delicate pink hue would surface. Fast forward to 2018 and there’s a new colour on the block in the form of what people are calling ‘Gen Z Yellow’. Bright and vibrant, this year’s shade of the moment is vastly different from the muted tones of seasons gone by. So why are colours symbolic of peer groups so close together, so far apart? We speak to Karen Haller, leading expert in the field of Applied Colour Psychology, about all things generational colour.

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Where did the idea of ‘generational colour’ come from?

The first hint we got of this was when Pantone chose their dual colours of the year (Serenity blue and Rose Quartz pink) having noticed ‘a generation that has less concern about being typecast or judged’ with an ‘increased comfort with using colour as a form of expression.’ “With almost every tint, tone and shade of pink being embraced it wasn’t long before the idea of Millennial Pink took off where a colour was used to define an entire generation. “Given its phenomenal success, it was only a matter of time before the next colour was sought out that captured the mood and essence of the next generation – ‘Gen Z Yellow’.

Do you believe generational colour is a trend that will continue?

Given the success of Millennial Pink and Gen Z Yellow, I believe generational colour trends are here to stay. It will be really interesting to see what colour comes next, however forecasters do need to be mindful. Being labelled or typecast is something people aren’t comfortable with and there may well be a backlash. Ultimately the generation has the final say as to whether the given colour trend is a success or failure.

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It’s been said that Millennial Pink represents nostalgia. In your view, what does Gen Z Yellow represent?

The first Gen Z Yellow that came out was a strong, bright yellow and, if I were to pick one word to summarise this hue, it would be ‘optimism’. Previously a lot of trend forecasters have chosen safe, muted colours, as we saw with the original Pantone pink that became known as Millennial Pink. Contrastingly, in society today there’s a lot of uncertainty and when this happens people typically choose to go in one of two directions – they either choose ‘safe’ colours that allow them to hibernate and hunker down, or they decide they want change and to see a bright, positive future and to feel optimistic. That is exactly what Gen Z Yellow is. We’re not talking about a muted yellow – this is a warm, bright and happy yellow that is full of positivity.

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How does the colour yellow affect human behaviour? Think about how you feel when you see the sun shining - it lifts our spirits, we feel optimistic and have a brighter outlook on life. The adverse effects of yellow can also be felt. It’s actually one of the colours people find harder to be around because too much yellow can irritate the nervous system. It’s also important to note that, when thinking about the ways in which colour affects human behaviour, we have to consider colour combinations and not just colours in isolation. For example, if you put yellow with black, straight away you’ve got a danger sign just like we see in nature, and this will impact human behaviour differently than yellow on its own.

Whilst the colour yellow can provide a refreshing burst of colour, it’s not for the faint-hearted. If you’re not quite ready to incorporate it into your home, why not try these alternative Pantone colour trends for Autumn/Winter 2018? Red Pear

Valiant Poppy

Martini Olive

Crocus Petal

Ultra Violet

Quetzal Green

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How can people incorporate yellow into their lives and homes? The advice I give my clients when they’re looking to incorporate yellow is to pick the tint, tone or shade that resonates with their personality. Whether that’s a lemon yellow, buttercup, sunflower or a saffron – there’s a huge range to choose from. Next, you’ll want to look at how much you want to use and where you place it. You don’t have to go all out – just a little bit of yellow like a bunch of flowers or a splash in a painting can bring a sense of brightness and happiness without being overwhelming. To learn more about the psychology of colour visit Karen’s website: www.karenhaller.co.uk and Instagram: @ karen_haller_colour

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I N T H E GA L L E RY

“These pieces bring memories flooding back. When I was a kid, my grandma took my brothers and I on walks down to the local stream. She would sit on the grass and watch us jumping across.”

BOB BARKER

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I N T H E GA L L E RY

ALEX ECHO

Listening to the Beatles on his AM radio sparked something special in a young Alex. Their Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band album and animated film Yellow Submarine became a visual library that would influence his art as an adult. His new body of work – titled Code Name Babington – is named after Major General James Melville, who was the original inspiration for the artwork of the Beatles’ album. It’s the first time the abstract

artist’s trademark word pieces have been available as limited edition prints. “They’re born out of an expanding funhouse of creativity, memory, nostalgia and an ever-growing love of England,” says Alex, who enjoys a full English breakfast twice a week. “Symbolism includes the two-up two-down format of your iconic terraced house. It’s the house where parents raised their children, and the house of hopes and dreams.”

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I N T H E G A L L E R Y Alex Echo

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“I love Great Britain! I love James Bond, Queen Elizabeth II, BBC Proms and Vivienne Westwood. I love bangers and mash, and a great London taxi ride with a cabbie who’s got too much to say.”

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Set in a brand-new location in the heart of Manchester’s bustling King Street, this year’s Summer Exhibition was our biggest yet. After whittling down hundreds of applicants to just 20, it was up to you and our esteemed panel of judges to select the final three at a glittering awards evening at our gallery. And what a night it was! When guests weren’t sipping on themed cocktails (complete with the Manchester worker bee symbol), they were admiring a wide spectrum of art – from diamond dust collages to giant ice- cream sculptures. When it was time to announce the winners, the crowd waited with bated breath to hear who had won the coveted publishing contract and £2,000 prize. Op artist Richard Levine was crowned the overall winner, wire sculptor Sadie Aucott took home the new Innovation Award and digital ASUMMERTO REMEMBER CELEBRATING IN:SIGHT 2018

concept artist MONOMOKO snared the People’s Choice Award – as voted for by our collectors online and in the gallery. By the end of the night, we were proud to have put our stamp on Manchester’s amazing art scene, as gallery manager Nic Beese explained. “It was a brilliant opportunity to showcase a fantastic and diverse selection,” he said. “ The city is already known as a powerhouse of artistic movement and growth, and it’s only getting better. The exhibition brought lots of new faces to the gallery, and symbolised everything we stand for: exciting, evolving art.” Former IN:SIGHT finalist Robert Oxley added: “It was humbling to be a judge. It isn’t so long since I was sitting by the phone nervously waiting for a response. My world has changed since joining Castle.”

This year’s Summer Exhibition was a spectacular success, so we’re already thinking about 2019! We'll be accepting applications for IN:SIGHT soon, but in the meantime you can submit your work for consideration by emailing artreview @ washingtongreen.co.uk.

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Franc GicléeandSilkscreenonPaper Editionof150 ImageSize31½"x31½" FramedSize34¾"x34¾" £795Framed

I N T H E GA L L E RY

R ICHARD LEVINE Richard Levine is a busy man. After being crowned the winner of IN:SIGHT 2018, the graphic designer and self-confessed pattern enthusiast has released his stunning debut collection. Hovering between representation and Pop/Op art, his colourful artworks explore the structure of iconic imagery by playing with colour and geometric shapes. One of the nation’s favourite symbols – the humble pooch – has been transformed into something which is both recognisable and unrecognisable all at once.

“The colours and textures of the stripes pass through various stages,” Richard explains . “I swap, replace and finesse them until I can’t push the piece any further. The viewer can focus in to follow the stripes and focus out to appreciate the familiar form.” It's an exciting step for the artist, who reveals he has plenty more themes up his sleeve. Influenced by Op artists from the 1960s (including Victor Vasarely and Richard Anuszkiewicz), he has come a long way since admiring Andy Warhol’s Mickey Mouse prints as a teenager in Hampstead Heath. He adds: “It still hasn’t quite sunk in!”

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PuggyLove GicléeandSilkscreenonPaper Editionof150 ImageSize31½"x31½" FramedSize34¾"x34¾" £795Framed

PitBull GicléeandSilkscreenonPaper Editionof150 ImageSize31½"x31½" FramedSize34¾"x34¾" £795Framed

“All of these dogs have a lot of character. It’s hard to choose a favourite as they are all very individual. I like them all in their own way.”

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I N T H E GA L L E RY

NIGEL HUMPHR I ES

“I do enjoy painting villains. But Spider-Man has to be my favourite superhero. He’s a normal, everyday guy who tries to bring good into the world.” Things you might not know about Nigel: he dreams about flying (but doesn’t like aeroplanes), his pet chickens roam his art studio and his superhero name would be Star Speed. Now you’ve been formally introduced, we’d like to reveal his stunning new collection.

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InfinityWar HandFinishedCanvasonBoard Editionof295

QuickAsTheFlash HandFinishedCanvasonBoard Editionof295

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I N T H E G A L L E R Y Nigel Humphries

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2:ThePanther HandFinishedCanvasonBoard Editionof295

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TALK TO THE ANIMALS

The Incredible Hulk probably isn’t the first thing that comes to mind when you think of wildlife art, but that’s part of Robert Oxley’s charm. The painter and passionate conservationist paid a visit to our Manchester gallery to talk us through his new art, superhero alter egos and some very big cats.

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“I think that elephants are nature’s greatest masterpiece. The female name Madhavi originates in India, and can be interpreted as ‘saint’. The yellow, orange and red capture the bright colours of the traditional ‘Holi’ Hindu spring festival."

Left:Madhavi HandEmbellishedCanvasonBoard Editionof195 ImageSize36"x36" £795

“Millennials will know Churchill from the popular insurance advert. Oh yes. But the phrase ‘British Bulldog spirit’ evolved during the 20th century, when the animal’s strength and courage became synonymous with the then prime minister, Winston Churchill.” Churchill HandEmbellishedCanvasonBoard Editionof195 ImageSize36"x36" £795 “The title of this piece is used by the Incredible Hulk, the Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde of the pop culture world. It’s a great line that serves as both a threat and a warning, echoing the tiger’s warrior state: calm and alert. Plus I had tremendous fun painting a tiger green!”

YouWouldn'tLikeMeWhenI'mAngry HandEmbellishedCanvasonBoard Editionof195 ImageSize30"x40" £725

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CAT-LEBRITY PORTRAIT

After watching Maya the adorable jaguar cub from the BBC hit television show Big Cats About the House, Robert knew he had to do something to help. Putting paintbrush to canvas, he created an ap- paws-worthy artwork which raised £2,600 at auction for The Big Cat Sanctuary in Kent. “I was captivated,” Robert says. “The tireless dedication of Maya’s keeper and his commitment to seeing her grow from a helpless cub to a boundless riot of energy was so uplifting. What’s not to love?” Working from his research into jungles and his memories of Maya as a cub, Robert scaled her outline on the canvas before blocking in her shape with paint. “I wanted to

keep her at this age,” Robert explains. “So I kept the eyes large and wide.” Growing up surrounded by a large forest, Robert spent his childhood imagining that big cats roamed free. He is now hugely passionate about protecting animals’ survival against poaching and habitat loss. Robert met Maya for the first time in May, when he unveiled his portrait. He says: “Meeting her was a thrilling and humbling experience, and something I will never forget. I am incredibly lucky. As you can see, she approved!”

A SKETCH IN TIME

You can donate at thebigcatsanctuary.org

Photos courtesy of The Big Cat Sanctuary

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What’s the last photograph you took? My son in Famagusta, an area of Cyprus that was invaded by the Turkish army in 1974. It’s a fascinating, apocalyptic place to visit. Which three people (dead or alive) would you invite for dinner? The film director Stanley Kubrick, occultist Aleister Crowley and founder of the Illuminati Adam Weisthaupt. I’d want to watch the unedited version of Eyes Wide Shut after dinner, hear the true agenda of the Illuminati, and open a portal to another dimension. Favourite season? It’s got to be spring for the optimism, new growth and overall feeling of renewal. What are you listening to? I’m a fan of Turkish funk music, pseudoscientific theorist Graham Hancock and the American stand- up comedian Joe Rogan. Plus I love animal folklore podcasts. What superpower would you pick? Invisibility – just to be nosy and sneak into places I shouldn’t. Favourite colour? At the moment, I’m loving fluorescent pink – shocking and translucent with a strong pigment. It’s great to wash over other colours. Favourite artist? I’m really into Walton Ford, an American watercolour artist who plays with the early natural history illustrations of John James Audubon and Edward Lear and twists them with animal folklore, fables and allegory on a vast scale. I highly recommend his book, Pancha Tantra. Dogs or cats? In the house: dogs. Outdoors: big cats. I’ve been around dogs all my life, as my parents bred English Springer Spaniels. I also drew my first dog, Sam, when I was five and it was published in a book for schools. Favourite book? The Unexpected Truth About Animals by Lucy Cooke. ROBERT OXLEY 10 QUESTIONS WITH

Favourite film? The Revenant.

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THE GENERATION GAME

Why inspiring younger generations to take an interest in the arts has never been so important.

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The number of students choosing creative GCSE subjects is in decline, prompting concerns regarding the future of the UK’s creative industry and the amount of young people lacking essential life skills. A BBC survey revealed 90% of secondary schools are either reducing lesson time, staff or facilities for at least one creative art subject. Schools taking part in the survey claimed that the emphasis on core academic subjects since the introduction of the English Baccalaureate (EBacc) coupled with funding pressures are the most common causes for cutting back on resources. The GCSE reform means music, art and drama, subjects - which are often perceived as less academic or vocational - are excluded from the Department for Education’s league tables and, as a result, the number of pupils taking art subjects at GCSE has fallen by a further 51,000 this year.  Eliminating creative subjects from the curriculum has had a knock-on effect on the mental health of students. In May 2018, the NSPCC reported that the number of referrals by schools in England seeking mental health treatment for pupils has risen by more than a third in the past three years. More recently, the Children’s Society stated that more than 100,000 children aged 14 in the UK are self-harming. Pressure from school was cited as one of the main reasons for this behaviour by experts. For many, self-harming is sadly a route taken to cope with overwhelming thoughts and feelings.

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Natasha Devon, mental health campaigner and author of a Beginner’s Guide to Being Mental, said: “We know the arts and creativity have a measurable therapeutic benefit, not just in recovering from mental illness but in maintaining mental wellness. They are therefore valuable for people at all points on the mental health spectrum. Unfortunately, when schools come under pressure, either financial or because their academic attainment is considered below par, arts tend to be one of the first things to be devalued, defunded and squeezed out of the curriculum (along with sport). “The government has recently published proposals which would make mental health education mandatory, but part of that would involve emphasising the importance of exorcising difficult feelings using creative methods. So essentially children are learning what they should do in theory but have no opportunity to put this knowledge into practice. “Furthermore, my book is centred on the idea that language can be an inadequate tool for expressing ourselves emotionally. This is particularly true of English, where we have a limited emotional vocabulary. I have seen pieces of art created by people in recovery who have captured the experience of living with mental illness far more accurately and powerfully than I could as a writer. Being heard and understood is a fundamental human need, but we must remember that not all communication is verbal". 

© Jonathan Donovan

CASE STUDY

Feversham Primary School in Bradford has been shortlisted for two national teaching awards; quite an accomplishment for a school that - only eight years ago - was in ‘special measures’. Recognising that the school was on a downward spiral, Head Teacher Naveed Idrees decided to integrate art, drama and music more broadly across the school day. The staff adopted the Kodály approach, which encourages children to learn subconsciously at first, through playing musical games. Children learn rhythm, hand signs and movement, in a way that will help their reading, writing and maths. The method proved

fruitful for the struggling primary school, and in June this year they were upgraded to a ‘Good’ rating by Ofsted and made it into the top 10% nationally for their pupils’ progress in writing, reading and maths. The transformation of Feversham Primary School makes a convincing case for the importance of creative arts in a child’s development, both mentally and academically. This is further supported by the British Association of Art Therapists, who claim that along with encouraging creative thinking and increasing the feel- good chemical dopamine, art can also stimulate your brain to grow new neurons.

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Photo courtesy of The Varkey Foundation

The education reform is not only having a negative impact on students. A recent poll of teachers by the National Education Union indicated that more than 80% said they had considered quitting the profession over the past year due of heavy workloads and pressure to meet the government's standards. One teacher decided to take matters into her own hands. After winning $1m, Andria Zafirakou could have retired from teaching and put her feet up. However, the north London teacher revealed that she would be using the money that she won in the Varkey Foundation annual Global Teacher prize to set up a campaigning charity designed to get more artists and art organisations into schools. She told us: “It is absolutely vital to ensure that all schools are offering a curriculum that enables all students to experience the arts. This should not be an "add on" but bolted securely into their daily timetables. If we do not support our schools to achieve this, then we are at risk of depriving a generation of young people of the opportunity to gain skills to excel in all that they do. This is one of the main reasons why I set up my charity Artists in Residence with the money awarded from the Global Teacher Prize. I want to help bring and introduce artists from all genres to schools with the aim of working with the school communities and with the hope of inspiring our children to take up the arts.”

In September 2018, Andria joined the Prince of Wales, Andrew Lloyd Webber and Benedict Cumberbatch as they pledged their support for more creativity in the classroom at a conference hosted by the Prince of Wales charity, Children and The Arts. Prince Charles emphasised the importance of art to the economy: “ We in this country have a fantastic reputation as a country through its creative industries. We don’t realise enough, I don’t think, how much those creative industries contribute to our whole economy and if you’re thinking in just purely economic terms it's worthwhile.” It’s not just school subjects that are facing a dip in numbers, according to the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS), museums and galleries across Britain are suffering from a decline in visitor numbers. The biggest drop in 2015/16 was seen in educational visits and school groups. According to the Creative Industries Federation, the creative industries are worth £92 billion a year to the UK economy – this is more than gas, life sciences, oil, automotive and aeronautics industries combined. In a letter to the Guardian, artists Tracey Emin, Rachel Whiteread and Jeremy Deller warned that the reintroduction of ‘traditional’ subjects, “places one of our largest and most successful global industries at risk”

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As we see creativity and arts disappearing from schools, the resurgence of art in pop culture is a welcome change. During one of their shows in London, Beyoncé and Jay-Z released the first single and video Apes**t from their first collaborative album 'Everything Is Love'. The 6 minute video was filmed in the Louvre and features some of the world’s most recognised artworks such as the Mona Lisa, Portrait of a Negress and Great Sphinx of Tanis. With over 112 million views and 8 nominations at the 2018 MTV Video Music Awards, the video caused waves amongst not only fans but the whole world. So much so that the Louvre now offers a tour of the art featured in the music video. Victoria Beckham and Sotheby’s announced their curatorial collaboration in June 2018, ahead of the auction house’s Old Masters Paintings sale in July. Beckham’s flagship boutique on Mayfair’s exclusive Dover Street played host to a selection of her favourite pieces from the lot, as part of the Mayfair Art Weekend. Andrew Fletcher, Sotheby’s head of auction sales for Old Master paintings, reported to artnet News that he felt the publicity had been extremely beneficial and was quoted as saying, “I think the more we and others do this sort of thing, the more people are going to be attracted to our world.” So why does all this matter? Children and young adults are the best resource that we have to shape our future, and we should be equipping them with the skills and knowledge they need, in whatever guise we can. Consequently, whether one regards these ‘celebrity’ collaborations as dumbing down, sacrilege or ill-advised misappropriation, we must be glad of one thing: younger generations are being introduced to the visual art by proxy through their famous heroes.

The Carters - Photo courtesy of Ricky Saiz

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