Capitol Hill Booklet

August 2015

stairwells and elevator, reinforcing and adding building structural components, running groundwater pumps and drainage piping, establishing electrical and data rooms, and installing storefront

for Kids program. The center now offers its full range of programs with the intention of adding more college credit programs in the future.

The OCCC Capitol Hill Center had 1,400 student enrollments and served approximately 12,000 visitors. 2016

The City of Oklahoma City gives OCCC $3.3 million from the downtown TIF towards Phase I of the project.

August 18, 2017 The OCCC Capitol Hill Center is formally dedicated.

glass systems and exterior metal panels. The final touch in this phase was adding new OCCC-branded signage on the building’s exterior. Phase II began in August 2016 and finished out the first-floor interior of both buildings,

With these programs, the OCCC Capitol Hill Center improves and increases access to postsecondary education for the Capitol Hill community, preparing individuals for future success in the workforce. In the 2016 fiscal year, the center had 1,400 student enrollments and approximately 12,000 visitors. It is expected these numbers will exponentially increase with the opening of the new center. In 2016 and 2017, the OCCC Capitol Hill Center received two additional grants of note. The iFund Opportunities

2010-2014

August 2016 Phase II of the project begins.

The initial phases of the OCCC Capitol Hill Center project begin with the Asbestos Abatement Phase in 2010 and the Pre-Construction Demolition Phase which started in July 2014.

March 2015

Phase 1 of the OCCC Capitol Hill Center construction begins.

W ith the opening of the new OCCC Capitol Hill Center at 325 SW 25 th Street, the community can expect even more from Oklahoma City Community College. The center will continue to offer life-changing educational and workforce development opportunities. It is envisioned to be a center of community development and engagement. It has been a legacy in the making and will be a continued legacy for generations. The college worked with City Hall to secure just over $3 million in funding from a tax increment financing (TIF) district to provide partial funding for the new OCCC Capitol Hill Center.

installing heating and cooling systems, fire suppression systems, new flooring and finishes, restrooms, and electrical equipment. The completion of this phase enabled the

The renovation of the property began with the Asbestos Abatement Phase in October 2010 which lasted two months and was completely funded by grant money. Following this phase, the Pre-Construction Demolition Phase began in July 2014 which also lasted two months. This phase allowed for the identification of any unforeseen facility design needs that may not have been previously visible. This included the removal of all existing interior walls, ceiling and flooring materials, ductwork, piping, and fixtures. Phase I of the construction project began in March 2015. This phase focused on renovating the building’s exterior, restoring the exterior masonry, replacing the rooftop and constructing the new rooftop terrace, installing two new

functionality of community and general education classrooms, computer classrooms, faculty and administrative offices, the community room, reception area, art gallery, and rooftop terrace.

for Children Grant from the Oklahoma City Community Foundation funds the Community After School Tutoring (CAST) Program. The CAST program serves second graders from Capitol Hill Elementary School with the intent to increase reading and math literacy as well as comprehension skills.

The completion of Phase II permitted the opening of the OCCC Capitol Hill Center in the summer of 2017. The first program to christen the new facility was the College

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