Capitol Hill Booklet

1987

1980’s

Langston’s in Capitol Hill closes. OCCC is flourishing with thousands of students and an economic impact of $500 million each year.

The downturn in the oil industry causes a long period of recession.

1992-1997

Oklahoma City Mayor Ron Norick introduces the MAPS plan to revitalize downtown OKC and the surrounding inner urban neighborhoods. Capitol Hill becomes a Main Street District.

1989

1974

Oklahoma City celebrates its centennial with

Crossroads Mall opens and several Capitol Hill retailers including J.C. Penney and John A. Brown leave the area for prominent anchor locations.

1 million residents.

Photo credit: Jim Argo

1983

South Oklahoma City Junior College is officially renamed Oklahoma City Community College.

Before 1985, OKCPS students were bused across the metro to create more diverse and less segregated schools. This practice becomes optional in 1985 and urban schools return to a near-segregation period with disproportionate racial demographics reflective of the neighborhood populations. In then blighted areas such as Capitol Hill, this becomes a huge equity challenge for funding the district’s schools. One bright spot was the success of South Oklahoma City Junior College, officially renamed Oklahoma City Community College (OCCC) in 1983. By 1987, it’s estimated that OCCC contributes nearly half a billion dollars in economic impact to Oklahoma City, offering broad access to higher education opportunities for over 22,000 students in the metro.

By the beginning of the 1990s, Oklahoma City celebrates its centennial with a population of 1 million residents. In 1992, Oklahoma City Mayor Ron Norick develops the novel MAPS capital improvement plan to catalyze growth and development in OKC’s withered downtown and the surrounding inner urban neighborhoods. In 1997, Capitol Hill becomes a Main Street district. Main Street districts are located throughout the United States and are overseen by nonprofit foundations aimed at revitalizing economic and community development in aging or blighted historic areas. These groups focus on historic preservation, cultural diversity, placemaking, and growing businesses. Capitol Hill Main Street is at the heart of much of the area’s renewal efforts today and is comprised of community leaders from around the Oklahoma City metro.

2000-2012 The Present

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