2013 Larimer County Community Report

A HIGH-LEVEL OVERVIEW OF COUNTY SERVICES, GOALS, & PERFORMANCE.

www.larimer.org

LETTER FROM THE COMMISSIONERS

Welcome to our first Community Report! One of our most important responsibili- ties as Commissioners is ensuring the most efficient use of tax revenue. To ac- complish this, we instituted performance measures for the services the County provides. These measures let you know the value you receive for your tax dollars and help us invest funds where they get the best value and results. While this report is a summary of those important measures and services it also outlines new programs we are implementing to

99% 1%

of county services are available to ALL residents of services are for unincorporated areas only (Community Development)

achieve higher efficiencies. We think ev- ery taxpayer deserves this information. We hope it is useful to you. Learn more and connect with us at larimer.org/bocc. (from left) Lew Gaiter III District I , Steve Johnson District II , Tom Donnelly, District III

89.8%of surveyed residents feel Lar- imer County services are performed adequately or better than required.

ELECTED OFFICIALS

Steve Miller Assessor

Angela Myers Clerk & Recorder

Patrick C. Allen, M.D. Coroner

Cliff Riedel District Attorney

Justin Smith Sheriff

Chad Washburn Surveyor

Myrna Rodenberger Treasurer

LETTER FROM THE COUNTY MANAGER

$13M $6M $5M

What an honor to present the first annual Community Report of Larimer County services, performance and

LARIMER COUNTY BUDGET WHERE THE MONEY COMES FROM Property Taxes: $93M Charges for Services: $69M

$34M

$93M

Larimer County receives only 25 C of every dollar collected through property taxes.

goals! This overview showcases the diver- sity of services we provide to the more than 300,000 citizens of our community. Larimer County government is dedicated to improv- ing the quality of life we all experience and does that through our work in five broad ser- vice categories. This report touches on each of those and notes the challenges posed by two major disasters in the last two years. We hope this snapshot inspires your interest in County government and helps to open ongo- ing dialogue with you. Please let me know what you think: lhoffmann@larimer.org.

$46M

Intergovernmental Revenue: $52M Other Financing Sources: $46M Sales and Use Taxes: $34M Use of Fund Balance: $13M Interest Earnings and All Other: $6M

$69M

$52M

Licenses and Permits: $5M Total of All Sources: $318M

$14M

HOW THE MONEY IS SPENT Non-Operational Procedural Accounts: $89M Community Resources, Infrastructure and Planning : $55M Public Safety Services : $64M Human & Economic Services: $59M

$37M

$89M

$59M

Strategic Leadership & Administration: $37M Public Records & Information Services: $14M Grand Total Budget: $318M Net Operational Budget: $229M

$55M

Linda Hoffmann County Manager

$64M

Larimer County, Colorado (970) 498-7004 (direct)

PUBLIC SAFETY

SAFE COMMUNITIES, IMPARTIAL JUSTICE

LARIMER COUNTY JAIL POPULATION

The Larimer County Jail is the ONLY jail in all of Larimer Coun- ty. Through the successful use of alternative sentencing, Larimer County has lowered the average daily jail population, despite no- ticeable increases in population, which extends the useful life of the current facility and saves tax payers money.

SINCE 2006

JAIL POPULATION HAS DECREASED 12%

COUNTY POPULATION HAS INCREASED 10%

SERVICES • Alternative Sentencing • Community Corrections • Crime statistics and reporting • District Attorney • Emergency Management • Investigations • Coroner • Jail • Patrol • Wildland fire management

2006 JAIL POPULATION: 513 2012 JAIL POPULATION: 453

2006 COUNTY POPULATION: 281,215 2012 COUNTY POPULATION: 310,487

IN 2012, THE LARIMER COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE INVESTIGATED:

1 14 9 474

208 733 56 6

The net result included 2,230 arrests for new charges. The emergency communications center staff handled approximately 7,500 emergency 911 calls and 83,000 non-emergency calls.

HOMICIDE SEXUAL ASSAULTS ROBBERIES ASSAULTS

BURGLARIES LARCENY / THEFT CASES MOTOR VEHICLE THEFTS ARSONS

ALTERNATIVE SENTENCING Alternative Sentencing is a cost effective alternative to jail time for lesser offenders. Offenders “pay back the commu- nity” through work for nonprofits and local governments and they pay administrative fees to reduce the cost of the program.

MINIMIZING FAILURE TO APPEAR WARRANTS

Larimer County pro- vides services beyond arrest for all crimes inside and outside of city limits including prosecution, sentenc- ing and incarceration.

Individuals scheduled to appear in court can expect a phone call re- minding them of their ap- pointment. This simple system has decreased “failure to appear” war- rants by nearly 40%.

40% DECREASE

PER OFFENDER $53/DAY SAVINGS

ALTERNATIVE SENTENCING @$34/DAY COMPARED TO INCARCERATON @$87/DAY

DISASTER RESPONSE & RECOVERY Residents rely on local government for critical support during disaster. In the last two years, Larimer County has endured two major events. In these circumstances, every single department gets involved with the common goal of protecting the lives and property of County residents.

HIGH PARK FIRE 2012 87, 200 acres burned; 264 homes and cabins destroyed • Emergency response • The Ranch: evacuee shelter, home for large animals • Air quality monitoring • Landfill regulations changed to accept debris

2013 FLOOD IN LARIMER COUNTY $100M in road damage; 180 structures destroyed & 420 structures damaged •  Emergency response and rescue efforts • Damage assessment • Road and Bridge: temporary solutions, rebuilding strategy • Health and Human Service inspections and information

DISTRICT ATTORNEY FOR THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT

92% $13.9M

CONVICTION RATE FOR SERIOUS CRIMES

RESTITUTION OBTAINED FOR VICTIMS

These are just a few of the many examples of the County’s timely response, creative problem solving, and true public service.

*2012

COMMUNITY RESOURCES, INFRASTRUCTURE & PLANNING QUALITY INFRASTRUCTURE, CONSCIENTIOUS PLANNING

COUNTY-OWNED OPEN SPACE AND TRAILS

TRAILS: 33% INCREASE

OPEN SPACE: 13% INCREASE

2012: 45,193 acres

2006: 40,134 acres

2006: 61 miles

2012: 81 miles

SERVICES • Building inspections • Community planning and development • County parks and trails • Engineering • Landfill and solid waste management • Open spaces • Road and bridge maintenance and repair

THE RANCH: A COMMUNITY ASSET

The Ranch Event Complex revenues come from ticket sales, concessions, and sponsorships. Profit from events supports needed facility re-investments and assures the McKee 4-H and Community Building remains a free as- set for local nonprofits and the greater community.

30,000 Horsetooth Reservoir is the 2nd busiest reservoir in the state of Colorado. In 2012, the reservoir welcomed approximately 30,000 boaters.

• Rural lands • The Ranch

$8M

ADMIT ONE

REVENUES EXPENDITURES

ROAD CONDITIONS AND SAFETY Road condition grades reflect how well pavement surfaces are maintained. CONDITIONS

$7M

= A

$5.9M

Well maintained roads create a safer environment for drivers and less wear and tear on vehicles. For safety ratings, visit the Transportation Scorecard at larimer.org/roads .

$6M

= B

$5.8M

= C

6%=D RATING <1%=F RATING

$5M

2006

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

RECYCLING MADE EASY

LANDFILL CAPACITY & RECYCLING Recycling keeps waste out of the landfill thereby increasing its useful life and delaying the expense of building a new facility.

With a County that is larger than the entire state of Delaware, a single centralized recycling center is not a realistic solution. Transfer stations provide drop-off con- venience for the residents of Berthoud, Wellington, Red Feather Lakes and Estes Park. Being able to recycle clos- er to home encourages citizens to do more of it and it saves fuel and time. In 2012, 961.68 tons of material was recycled from transfer stations.

40K

RECYCLED MATERIAL

30K

20K

37K 35K 32K 31K 34K 36K 37K

10K

0

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

PUBLIC RECORDS AND INFORMATION

OPEN DATA, TRANSPARENT PROCESSES

VOTE CENTERS AS A STATE MODEL

Larimer was the first County in the state to de- velop, test, and implement the “Vote Center” model for elections. Now called Voting Service and Polling Centers, the model has been rep- licated throughout Colorado. The Vote Center model makes it easy for registered voters to participate in elections by allowing them to cast ballots at any voting location regardless of precinct or district. In short: with Vote Cen- ters, there’s no wrong place to vote!

PERCENTAGE OF REGISTERED VOTERS WHO ACTUALLY VOTED

Larimer County (% voted)

US (% voted)

Colorado (% voted)

2006 2008 2010 2012

70.1% 76.0% 71.5% 89.6% 94.7% 98.6% 69.9% 79.4% 98.1% 86.8% 94.7% 98.8%

SERVICES • Birth and death certificates • Elections and voter registration • Marriage licenses • Property value assessment & tax collection • Public records • Vehicle registration

ESSENTIAL PUBLIC RECORDS

In 2012, the Larimer County treasurer col- lected taxes on 149,699 properties.

324,029

MARRIAGE LICENSES: 2,856 IN 2012

VEHICLE REGISTRATIONS: 324,029 IN 2012

PROPERTIES ASSESSED: 150,629 IN 2012

STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP, ADMINISTRATION

ENGAGED SERVICE, EFFICIENT GOVERNMENT

GUIDING PRINCIPLES Larimer County will add value to the lives of its citizens by: • Being good stewards of our public resources • Being customer driven • Empowering people to take responsibility • Building partnerships • Being a fulfilling & enjoyable place to work

CITIZEN SURVEY RESULTS

3.6 3.6 4.3

LARIMER COUNTY IS MOVING IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION I HAVE CONFIDENCE IN THE LARIMER COUNTY GOVERNMENT THE OVERALL QUALITY OF LIFE IN LARIMER COUNTY IS VERY GOOD

1=STRONGLY DISAGREE, 5=STRONGLY AGREE

SERVICES • Budgeting • Human Resources • Finance • County Attorney • Performance Measurement • Strategic Planning

STRATEGIC PLANNING

Citizens, elected offices, and Larimer County employees are working together to move us toward a desired future. The first phase of the comprehensive planning effort defined a vision and goals and was completed in May 2013. Phase II estab- lished objectives and performance measures. Phase III inte- grates these elements into Department work plans. Read more at larimer.org/bocc/future .

88% of surveyed resi- dents feel county ser- vices are “Highly Impor- tant” or “Important.”

HUMAN AND ECONOMIC HEALTHY PEOPLE, THRIVING ECONOMY

The food safety pro- gram protects public health through educa- tion, licensing and in- spections of the food service industry. RESTAURANT INSPECTIONS 1,844 INSPECTIONS PERFORMED

34% 33% 18% 12% 3% 2012 RESTAURANTS RATINGS EXCELLENT GOOD AVERAGE MARGINAL INADEQUATE

SERVICES • Adult protective services • Air quality monitoring and education • Child care assistance • Child protection and foster care • Child support • Communicable disease control • Food stamps/food assistance • Health education • Immunizations • Medicaid

WORKFORCE CENTER The Workforce Center provides programs and training that help create a skilled, knowledgeable and prepared workforce. The Workforce Center curriculum is guided by the Workforce Investment Board (comprised of employers and community leaders) which identifies the workforce skills needed by local companies to be successful.

Larimer County prevents and controls contagious diseases by monitoring illnesses from people, food, water, animals, and insects. The County also protects against West Nile virus, rabies, Tuberculo- sis, and other diseases.

4,616 JOBS POSTED BY THE WORKFORCE CENTER IN 2012

18,039 JOB SEEKERS SERVED IN 2012

• Resources for seniors • Restaurant inspections

• Temporary Assistance for Needy Families • Water quality regulation and inspection • Workforce training and counseling

LARIMER COUNTY IS A GREAT PLACE TO WORK 3.8 CITIZEN SURVEY RESULTS 1=STRONGLY DISAGREE, 5=STRONGLY AGREE

CHILD PROTECTION: A STATE LEADER When compared to other large counties in Colorado, Larimer County ranks first or second in most state-wide performance goals and consistently ex- ceeds national standards in protecting children. RANKED #1 IN COLORADO: • Children who remain in the home: 95% (national goal: 85%) •  Average daily populations of children placed in group care facilities: .2 per 1,000 children (national goal: less than 1) RANKED #2 IN COLORADO: •  Average daily population of children placed in out of home care (foster care and group care facilities): 2.6 per 1,000 kids (national goal is less than 5) •  Children in foster care for more than 2 years: 21% – goal is to achieve permanency within two years (national goal: less than 28%)

BETTER DECISIONS TO HELP KIDS Larimer County was the first county in the state of Colo- rado to implement the RED (Review, Evaluate, and Di- rect) Team model where critical decisions about reports of abuse and neglect are made as a collaborative team as opposed to by an individual case manager. The team, including case managers, supervisors, and others, shares the responsibility and accountability for how reports are processed. The model has proven so successful, that it is now a required process in the state of Colorado.

*2012

STAY CONNECTED –PUBLIC COMMUNICATIONS Become an engaged citizen at www.larimer.org : •  Boards & Commissions •  Larimer County 101 •  Volunteer Opportunities •  Foster Families •  Public Comment •  Citizen Meetings contact: Deni La Rue, 970-498-7150, dlarue@larimer.org

“Bright Idea” award, Harvard Kennedy School of Government, Health and Human Services Software Development, September 2012 1st Place Savvy Web Application Competition, 25th Annual Geographic Information System for Transportation Symposium, Road Information Locator (RIL) application, May 2012

2013 In-House Innovation Award, Larimer County, new method to transition violent inmates from high security to general population, April 2013 Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Fi- nancial Reporting, Government Finance Officers Association, March 2013 (29th consecutive year) Starburst Award for Excellence, Colorado State Lottery, Plug in to Nature program, October 2012

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