Fyzical Jacksonville - March 2020

F Y Z I C A L THERAPY M O N T H L Y 904-223-2363

MARCH 2020

WWW.FYZICAL.COM/JACKSONVILLE

WHY GRITTINESS IS POWERFUL IN PHYSICAL THERAPY AND HOW IT CAN INFLUENCE THE REST OF YOUR LIFE

“growth mindset” and travel can help a lot. For example, kids who are taught about how much the brain grows and adapts to

of them is doable.” However, we need to endure these individual feats to accomplish greatness. When I thought about what my husband said, I realized that I learned endurance from an early age. I went through surgeries and physical therapy as a kid. I was out of school for a while, so recovery meant more than just gaining back my physical health; it meant maintaining my grades as well. It was a long-term process that I adjusted my daily life around. I feel for patients. I’m both sympathetic and empathetic to the struggles they are going through, whether they're trying to recover to get back to their favorite activity or simply trying to keep up with the responsibilities required of them. From both personal experience and as a health care provider, the goal of physical therapy isn't just to get better. I also ask the questions: What do you want out of it? What is your real aspiration? Are you looking to return to sports or travel? I’m always impressed by our patients who have been active their whole lives and are working hard to continue having an active lifestyle. A patient who sets goals based on their passions can spark a powerful endurance, which can really help with the small, everyday feats that contribute to a full and quick recovery. I recommend “Grit” to a lot of my patients, especially parents of young kids. While Duckworth is still looking for answers on the best way to encourage grittiness in children, things like the

Four years ago, my husband looked up from a book he was reading. “This is so you,” he said. “What do you mean it’s me?” I replied. He’s an extremely avid reader, so that could have meant anything! “You are so gritty.” He lifts the cover, and we started to discuss the book he was reading: “Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance” by Angela Lee Duckworth. That book became one of the most important books to me in my life and my field. Because March is International Women’s Month and Read Across America Day is March 2, it’s a perfect chance to share why Duckworth’s groundbreaking psychological studies can help patients with their recovery, as well as influence parents and professionals worldwide. Angela Lee Duckworth is a psychologist that researches and predicts individuals’ success in multiple fields, from West Point University to large businesses. Grit was the only shared trait among the most successful people in each field. For Duckworth’s research team, grit is more than just the willingness to handle difficult tasks; it's the strength to endure them. “Enthusiasm is common,” she writes. “Endurance is rare.” I find this especially true in the modern world. How often do we get distracted by the accomplishments of other people and lose track of our own progress? Duckworth has a response for this too. She describes greatness as “many individual feats, and each

failure will be less likely to give up during failures of their own; they will believe

failure is not a permanent condition. As for travel, for me and my family, I know our trip to Cuba left a significant impact on my daughter. It’s only 90 miles away from our coast, yet you can see poverty laid bare there in ways you would rarely ever see in the States. We talked often about how incredible it is to be an American woman and the opportunities we have. Our grittiness has far less obstacles here, thanks to our democracy and the generations of gritty women before us. In many ways, grittiness has been woven into the American dialogue for a long time, like how hard work can make anyone’s American dream a reality. But it can get lost in the way we talk about successful people these days. When we look at a famous actor or musician, we should assume they are not only talented but also willing to endure challenges to pursue their happiness. To celebrate literary and female accomplishments this March, I hope you give “Grit” a try. It is rare to hear anyone talk about it like she does. -Dr. Joanna Frantz

• 1 904-223-2363

Published by The Newsletter Pro | www.TheNewsletterPro.com

www.fyzical.com

Made with FlippingBook flipbook maker