CellCheck_Newsletter_February_Final

CellCheck ANIMAL HEALTH IRELAND NEWSLETTER Contributing to a profitable and sustainable farming and agri-food sector through improved animal health

FEBRUARY EDITION 2017

CELLCHECK PROGRAMME NEWS

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GUEST CONTRIBUTOR Dr. TomO’Dwyer, Head of Dairy Knowledge Transfer, Teagasc

CELLCHECK TIP OF THE MONTH P6

If in doubt, leave it out!

NATIONAL MASTITIS CONTROL PROGRAMME

CellCheck AnimalHealthIreland.ie Animal Health Ireland, 4-5 The Archways, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitrim, N41 WN27

AHI gratefully acknowledges the financial and other contributions of our stakeholders to the CellCheck programme.

NATIONAL MASTITIS CONTROL PROGRAMME

CellCheck AnimalHealthIreland.ie Animal Health Ireland, 4-5 The Archways, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitrim, N41 WN27

CELLCHECK PROGRAMME

February News

Finola McCoy, Programme Manager

I N this month’s edition of the CellCheck newsletter, our guest contributor is Tom O’Dwyer, Head of Dairy Knowledge Transfer in Teagasc. Tom talks about the CellCheck Farmer Workshops, as part of the Knowledge (KT) programme and some of the benefits and challenges associated with it. The first phase of KT workshop delivery is concluding, with more than 120 workshops delivered since October 2016, which is an incredible rate of delivery! The logistics required to deliver this number of workshops in a narrowwindowof time is no small feat, and I would like to sincerely thank all involved in the planning, organising and delivery of these events-it’s been a united effort! As outlined in

last month’s newsletter, we will shortly be carrying out a review of the first phase of workshop activity and preparing for the second phase of workshops, which will start once the spring peak has passed. Last month we also had the first meeting of the reconvened CellCheck Implementation Group. All stakeholder groups have been asked to nominate an individual to represent them and engage in discussions and key decisions. This recent meeting explored some of the current and future industry challenges relating to milk quality, such as antimicrobial resistance and the role that the dairy industry can play in reducing its risk.

Maeve O’Connor, Dairygold with a group of farmers from East Cork attending a recently held CellCheck Farmer Workshop.

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER FEBRUARY EDITION 2017

GUEST CONTRIBUTOR

CellCheck Farmer Workshops: a Knowledge Transfer Perspective

Dr. Tom O’Dwyer, Head of Dairy Knowledge Transfer, Teagasc

M astitis, both clinical and sub-clinical, imposes a cost on Irish dairy farmers and the Irish dairy processing industry. The €uroMilk pilot study (McCoy and Devitt, 2012) showed that a team based approach can be effective in improving mastitis control on Irish dairy farms. This led to the adoption of a team based approach to the delivery of the CellCheck workshops by AHI, with farm advisors being one of the four workshop ‘team players’. Many Teagasc advisors have already participated in workshops, and a number of Teagasc staff also contribute to the CellCheck Technical Working Group and Implementation Group. From a knowledge transfer and behavioural change perspective, therearetwocomplementarymechanisms at play at a CellCheck workshop. Firstly, there is the team approach of the four trainers. The participants experience a consistent message from each of the individual trainers, while also having the opportunity of clarifying different aspects of a query with individual trainers. In this way, the message can be re-enforced. Secondly, many of the participants undertaking the CellCheck workshop are part of a discussion group. We know from both research and experience that discussion groups are a powerful forum to bring about change. Discussion groups act as an effective means for farmers to witness technologies in practice by their peers and thus give members the confidence to apply

such technologies in their own businesses (Millar, 2010). Members of discussion groups learn from each other via observation, imitation and modelling in a process known as social learning (Bandura, 2000). Individual members can gain knowledge, acquire new skills and change mindset/ attitudes; all three are needed for behavioural change to happen.

Farmers like the interaction between the different team players and learn from the questions asked and the ensuing discussions.

From a Teagasc perspective, we are delighted to be involved in the co-delivery of the CellCheck Farmer workshops. Our involvement allows our Dairy Advisers to co-deliver important messages around milk quality – messages which we would be communicating in any case. I believe however that the team based approach gives the milk quality message more meaning and impact. After all, the Teagasc adviser,

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER FEBRUARY EDITION 2017

GUEST CONTRIBUTOR

veterinary practitioner, co-op adviser and milk machine technician can’t all be wrong, especially when they are all “singing from the same hymnsheet”? Farmers like the interaction between the different team players and learn from the questions asked and the ensuing discussions. The practical (and simple) demonstrations e.g. the correct approach to teat spraying also engage much discussion and are leading to practice change on dairy farms. The inclusion of the CellCheck Farmer workshops as part of the Dairy KT Groups programme is a welcome development but could perhaps be seen as a double- edged sword. While it is compulsory to complete the CellCheck workshop as part of the programme – consequently ensuring that a higher number of dairy farmers attend – the choice to attend (or not) has been taken from the dairy farmer. Notwithstanding this,

feedback fromfarmers attending theworkshopsuggests a very positive and effective learning experience. As more dairy farmers are trained, continued development of the CellCheck Farmer Workshop concept will be important to continue to attract farmers. Future developments for consideration might include prudent use of dry cow therapy. It will also be important to look at how the messages are “packaged” and what practical demonstrations can be developed for any new modules developed. I would also welcome the future development of a “farm-based, tailored, problem solving” service, using the same team based approach as adopted for the delivery of both the €uroMilk pilot study and the CellCheck Farmer Workshops.

REFERENCES: Bandura, A. (2000) Exercise of human agency through collective efficacy, Current Directions in Psychological Science , Vol. 9, No. 3, pp.75- 78. McCoy, F. and Devitt, C. (2010) EuroMilk pilot study: a team-based approach to milk quality and mastitis control in Ireland, Irish Grassland Association Journal , Vol.44, pp. 43 – 48. Millar, J. (2010) The Role of extension for improving natural resource management: the Australian experience. In: Jennings, J., Packham, R. and Woodside, D. (eds), Shaping Change: Natural Resource Management, Agriculture and the Role of Extension . Australia: Australasia-Pacific Extension Network (APEN), pp. 102- 110.

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER FEBRUARY EDITION 2017

CELLCHECK TIP OF THE MONTH If in doubt, leave it out!

[Click here] for previously published tips

E arly lactation is a high risk time for bulk tank residues, particularly antibiotics, as many of the cows calving down will have been treated with dry cow antibiotic several weeks ago and it can be a very busy time of the farming year. Milk contaminated with any residue of antibiotic must never enter the bulk tank.

Remember!

1. Ensure colostrum and transition milk is not included in the bulk tank. • Withhold milk for at least the first 8 milkings after calving- you can’t visually assess colostrum levels. 2. Minimise residual teat sealer. • At first milking after calving, strip any cows treated with internal teat sealers at least 10-12 times • Withhold their milk for at least the first 8 milkings even if they didn’t get antibiotic dry cow therapy (DCT). 3. Dilution is not the solution! • Once a cow calves check the exact date that she was treated with antibiotic DCT. • Ensure that the specified Minimum Dry Period days plus the Milk Withholding Time post-calving is adhered to before putting her milk in the bulk tank. • Cows calving earlier than expected may not have completed the full Minimum Dry Period. For these cows, you must follow the product instructions. • If you suspect an error in cow identity, treatment or calving date records, do not put the milk in the tank until the issue is resolved. Consult your milk processor immediately.

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER FEBRUARY EDITION 2017

CELLCHECK TIP OF THE MONTH

4. Double check any bought-in cows • Make sure you ask the seller for exact

treatment dates of any purchased cows. Find out what DCT products were used.

5. Talk with your staff and relief milkers. • Make sure they know the routine for checking before putting the milk into the bulk tank. • Clearly mark all cows being excluded from the tank, and make sure all staff understand the marking system.

Finally, if you suspect any cows have been milked into the tank by mistake notify your milk processor immediately to avoid contaminating a full silo of milk.

For more information on reducing the risk of residues in milk, see Management Note F in the CellCheck Farm Guidelines for Mastitis Control

Antibiotic dry cow treatment is infused into each quarter immediately after the last milking of a cow’s lactation. It is an important management procedure for treating existing udder infections and preventing new infections during the dry period. All DCT products are registered with the Irish Medicines Board (IMB), and have a specified Minimum Dry Period (MDP) after treatment. If a cow calves before this time has expired, withholding periods for milk may be longer than usual. Withholding periods (WHP) are shown on the product labels, and also on the IMB website www.imb.ie . Follow these guides to minimise risk of antibiotic residues in meat or milk after use of DCT: • Ensure all cows to be culled have passed their recommended withholding period for meat. • Withholding periods for meat are counted from the date the DCT is administered. • Check each cow that received DCT has passed her Minimum Dry Period when she calves. • If not, mark her clearly and withhold milk from the bulk tank. • Keep colostrum and transition milk from all freshly calved cows out of the bulk tank. • For milk quality reasons, all cows should have their colostrum and transition milk withheld from the bulk tank for at least the first eight milkings after calving. This applies to all cows, whether they received DCT or not. • For cows that did receive DCT (and their Minimum Dry Period has elapsed), a withholding period for milk after calving is specified for each product (see product labels or IMB website www.imb.ie ). • If you suspect an error in cow identity, or treatment or calving date records, do not put the milk in the bulk tank until the issue is resolved. Consult your milk processor. There may be cases where a milk antibiotic check test may help avoid the possibility of an inadvertent inclusion of residue positive milk. You should immediately contact your milk processor representative to discuss appropriate action. F Guide to withholding periods after use of dry cow treatment Management Note

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CellCheck Farm Guidelines for Mastitis Control

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER FEBRUARY EDITION 2017

CELLCHECK REGIONAL COORDINATORS

A Resource and Point of Contact for CellCheck Activities in your Area

Paul Cullinan 087 2470803 Mayo/Sligo Aurivo

Brendan Dillon 087 2626851 Cork/Waterford/ Wexford/Wicklow Glanbia

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Tom Starr 087 6697010 Tipperary/Limerick Arrabawn Co-op

Sean McCarthy 066 7163200 Kerry/Clare Kerry Agribusiness

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John Fitzpatrick 086 0426567 Kilkenny/Laois/Carlow/ Kildare/Dublin Glanbia

Sinead Treanor 023 8822369 West Cork Carbery Group

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Tom Downes 087 2564669 Longford/Monaghan Lakeland Dairies

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Andrew O’Neill 086 1836505 Tipperary Tipperary Co-Op

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