Coye Law - October 2017

2017

407-871-3811 Coye Law Chronicle www.coyelaw.com

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ONLY STUPID PEOPLE WOULD LET A LAWYER PUT THEM ON A BILLBOARD!

“I WON TWO MILLION!” $$$

I see it almost every day — and at least three times a week. It never fails. I’ll be driving along the highway, and there it is: a billboard put up by a personal injury lawyer with a picture of a client. Next to that photo is a giant check, usually accompanied by a quote: “So and So Attorneys Got Me $500,000!” or something like that. Folks, I don’t know why someone would let an attorney do that to them, but I’m here to tell you that it’s not worth it. We already live in a society where a lot of information about ourselves is easily found. Why add to that? At best, you’re putting yourself out there and giving away even more information. At worst, you’re telling anybody who drives by, which could be millions of different people every week, that you just got a big pile of cash. And what’s that going to do? Well, as soon as those people find out a little more about you (and it won’t be hard with your face

“These billboards don’t explain that each case is unique, nor do they explain that after you get your money, you may still have to pay court costs, attorney fees, and other expenses.”

already on there), you could get calls from just about every charity imaginable. You could get sales visits, find yourself tracked down by con men, and possibly even targeted by violent criminals. If you have outstanding debts and your creditors see that sign, you can bet they’ll be in touch, too. And the same is true with family. You have zero control over who sees that billboard, and it’s not like a TV ad that runs occasionally — it’s always “on,” so to speak. In addition to the privacy concerns that raising a billboard with someone’s face next to a giant check bring up, there are other problems that arise, as well. This sort of thing means clients come in with unrealistic expectations about how much money they can get for their case and how long it will take

to secure that money. These billboards don’t explain that each case is unique, nor do they explain that after you get your money, you may still have to pay court costs, attorney fees, and other expenses. As you can see, there are a whole lot of downsides to letting an attorney put your name on a billboard next to a big check. But what are the upsides? That’s where it gets a little unclear to me, and that’s a big problem in and of itself. As attorneys, we’re required to look after our clients’ best interests, period.

How is this in someone’s best interest?

It isn’t. Period. – Wade Coye

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