2017 July POINT!

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The bioscience industry contributes $6.7 billion in economic activity in the state of Oklahoma. BOOMI NG B IOSCI ENCE

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PHOTO BY JIM STAFFORD

IN THIS ISSUE:

10| Chamber Achieves 2017 Legislative Priorities 14| Flashback-Fast Forward: Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center 22| Chamber, Tinker Have Long History of Cooperation

Bio Industry Contributes $6.7B in Economic Activity PHOTO BY JIM STAFFORD

B ioscience is booming in Oklahoma and more than 30 scientists, business leaders, educators and economic development officers from across the state of Oklahoma took that message to attendees of the 2017 BIO International Convention in San Diego last month. At the convention, attendees connected with an international audience of potential investors and partners, all under the banner of the Oklahoma Bioscience Association (OKBio). “The momentum for this region’s bioscience industry has truly never been stronger,” said Roy H. Williams, CCE, president and CEO of the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber. “The groundbreaking research being conducted in Oklahoma City alongside the opportunities for collaboration and investment set our

bioscience community apart from many locations across the nation. A perfect example of this is the recent sale of Selexsys to global pharmaceutical giant Novartis, proof that what is happening here is generating international interest.” Oklahoma’s bioscience sector currently contributes more than $6.7 billion in economic activity and supports more than 51,000 Oklahoma jobs. The sector also produces annual revenues of more than $4.1 billion. Throughout the state, pockets of research excellence continue to develop in Oklahoma City, Ponca City, Ardmore, Stillwater and Norman. During the convention, attendees were able to share recent successes of the bioscience sector. Read more about the following successes at www.okcchamber.com/news.

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In the mix of the successes is the OKBio, which represents more than 500 bioscience-related businesses and organizations across the state. OKBio is the voice for Oklahoma’s dynamic and diverse bioscience community, and it works with partners statewide to foster productive bioscience partnerships and facilitate access to investment capital.

• OMRF receives federal grant to investigate cell death • Cytovance enters drug development program • Oklahoma Blood Institute introduces new research initiative • Moleculera Labs Highlights Biomarker-Based Tests as Diagnostic Aid for Infection-Triggered CNS Disorders • OKC doctors advance technology to fight solid- tumor cancers • Web-based bio-informatics allows for selective breeding among livestock • PERFEQTA automation software on display at BIO

To learn more, visit www.okbio.org.

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Leadership Notes

The power of a persistent investment I n the minds of Oklahoma City residents, temporary sales tax proposals are often associated with the Metropolitan Area Projects (MAPS). MAPS, MAPS for Kids and MAPS 3 used a penny sales tax for transformative projects, and there is no doubt that those projects changed Oklahoma City’s destiny. But if you look at the history of voter-approved sales taxes in Oklahoma City, these investments have been used for more than just the MAPS programs. Before voters approved MAPS in 1993, a three-quarter cent sales tax added funds to both the police and fire departments. Then after citizens decided to “Finish MAPS Right” in 1998, voters approved a half-penny sales tax for public safety before MAPS for Kids was approved. And before MAPS 3, a penny sales tax was used to update Oklahoma City’s arena so that the NBA team could locate here. Each time voters approved a sales tax the focus was different, but the outcome was the same: a better Oklahoma City. This September, we will once again have the opportunity to harness the power of a penny in changing the landscape of our city. The upcoming Sept. 12 election includes a general-obligation bond program, a 1-cent temporary sales tax that would take effect once the MAPS 3 tax ends and a quarter-cent sales tax intended to fund police and fire services. The focus? Streets and safety, something that is important to improving Oklahoma City’s quality of life for both individual residents and businesses. When combined with funds from the general-obligation bond, yes votes on Sept. 12 will invest $785 million in building and repairing streets and related “complete street” improvements, including sidewalks and bike lanes, all across Oklahoma City. Thanks to our shared history, we know that small, persistent investments can make a huge difference. Whether we are building a new park or making sure our streets are safer, all contribute to Oklahoma City’s ongoing transformation.

Roy H. Williams, CCE President & CEO

Sincerely,

Roy H. Williams, CCE Chamber CEO & President

7

CALENDAR OF EVENTS July 11 Member Orientation Time: 8:30 to 10 a.m. Location: Chamber offices, 123 Park Ave. July 25 Sunset Reception Time: 4 to 6 p.m.

schools

Location: Scott Rice, 6900 N Bryant Ave. July 26 MegaLunch Time: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Location: Hidden Trails Country Club, 6501 S Country Club Drive Aug. 8 Member Orientation Time: 4 to 5:30 p.m. Location: Dell USA, LP, 3501 SW 15th St. Aug. 17 Chairman’s Breakfast with U.S. Rep. Tom Cole Time: 8 to 9:30 a.m. Location: Oklahoma Christian University, 2501 E Memorial Road Aug. 23 State of the Schools Time: 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Location: National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, 1700 NE 63rd St. Aug. 29 Sunset Reception Time: 4 to 6 p.m. Location: Bravo Cucina Italiana, 13810 N Pennsylvania Ave.

Save the Date for State of the Schools Oklahoma schools need the support of the business community now more than ever before. Learn more about education improvements at the Chamber’s upcoming State of the Schools on Aug. 23, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. The program will include a keynote address from V. Burns Hargis, president of Oklahoma State University, comments from Oklahoma City Public School District Superintendent Aurora Lora and a panel discussion from area education experts. Panelists include Oklahoma State Superintendent Joy Hofmeister, Representative Leslie Osborn and Edmond Public Schools Superintendent Bret Towne. Tickets are $50 for Chamber members and $75 for nonmembers, and tables of eight are available for $1,250. Register online at www.okcchamber.com/sos. Special thanks to Signature Sponsor Bank of Oklahoma, School Supply/Centerpiece Sponsor American Fidelity Assurance Company Public Affairs and Signature Event Sponsors Central Liquor Company, Devon Energy Corp., Enable Midstream Partners, Hobby Lobby and Walmart District Office of Public Affairs.

Register for events online and view a complete event calendar at www.okcchamber.com/events.

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U.S. Rep. Tom Cole to Headline Chairman’s Breakfast Mark your calendar for the upcoming Chairman’s Breakfast with U.S. Rep. Tom Cole (4th District) from 8 to 9:30 a.m. at Oklahoma Christian University’s Gaylord University Center on Thursday, Aug. 17. At the event, Rep. Cole will give attendees a legislative update on federal issues facing Congress and Oklahoma. Tickets are $40 for Chamber members and $60 for nonmembers. Visit www.okcchamber.com/events to register. Special thanks to Signature Sponsor Cox Communications.

Meet New Business Contacts at MegaLunch Ready to promote your business to an engaged group of Chamber members? Then be sure to register for MegaLunch, one of the Chamber’s most unique

format of this event, only one person per member company may attend, and advance registration (three business days prior to the event) is required. Register at www.okcchamber.com/events. Special thanks to Host Sponsor Hidden Trails Country Club and Networking Event Sponsors AT&T Oklahoma, American Fidelity Assurance Company, Centennial Bank, Grand Casino Hotel Resort, Liberty Business Park and OU Medicine.

networking opportunities. On July 26, MegaLunch will be held at Hidden Trails Country Club from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. MegaLunch uses a computerized rotation schedule to guide members around tables where they present a 90-second pitch to other attendees. Due to the unique

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Chamber Achieves 2017 Legislative Priorities

The 2017 Legislative Session adjourned on May 26. The Chamber achieved many of its legislative priorities this session despite a challenging budget environment and the disappointment of the final weeks of session, when a teacher pay raise was not enacted and many criminal justice reform measures were not considered by the House. The following is a wrap-up discussion of the Chamber’s successes. Read more at www.okcbusinessadvocate.com. Aerospace engineering tax credit, other key incentives protected Despite a nearly $1 billion budget shortfall and increased pressure to identify cuts, all legislation negatively impacting the Chamber’s priority economic development programs was defeated. The Aerospace Engineering Tax Credit was extended by eight years until 2026, and the Aerospace Engineer Tuition Reimbursement Tax Credit, Historical Rehabilitation Tax Credit and Oklahoma Quality Events Act were all protected from legislation that would have repealed or limited their economic development impact.

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taken by North Carolina and Indiana. SB 694, which would have prohibited cities and counties from enacting or enforcing ordinances that protect individuals from discrimination, and SB 197, which would have provided business owners the right to discriminate against those “whose marriage, lifestyle or behavior” was contrary to their own conscience or religious beliefs, both failed to advance. The failure of these measures prevented potentially catastrophic economic losses in Oklahoma and kept the state from joining the list of those states viewed as hostile to diversity. SQ 780 and 781 protected The Chamber worked to protect State Questions 780 and 781, which were overwhelmingly approved by voters in November, from legislation aimed at repealing many of these key reforms. SB 256 would have reclassified many drug and property fines as felonies. In addition, HB 1482 would have reinstated certain drug possession crimes as felonies. Both bills failed to advance.

Anti-business/economic development gun measures defeated The Chamber led a broad-based coalition, Oklahomans for Business and Property Owners’ Rights, comprised of 45 businesses, associations, universities and law enforcement groups, to oppose irresponsible expansion of gun rights in a manner that would be harmful to economic development or public safety. Of the 49 bills introduced this year to expand gun rights, no legislation harmful to economic development or business owners’ rights was enacted into law. The Chamber and coalition members successfully stopped all legislation that would have negatively impacted business owners’ rights, allowed guns on college campuses, allowed guns to be carried into high-economic impact events and prevented law enforcement from protecting the public’s safety. Discriminatory legislation defeated The Chamber joined with partners to defeat discriminatory legislation that would have led Oklahoma down the economically devastating paths

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against a portion of the costs incurred in constructing or renovating tourism projects. REAL ID legislation signed into law Oklahoma legislative leaders brought the state into compliance with the federal REAL ID law enacted following the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks by passing HB 1845. Failure to do so would have required Oklahoma residents, beginning in January 2018, to possess a federal ID such as a passport or military ID to fly commercially or to access military installations and federal buildings. HB 1845 was signed into law by Gov. Fallin on March 2. Transportation funding protected In the closing weeks of session, it appeared the Oklahoma Department of Transportation was facing a $250 million reduction in its ROADS Fund, which is the primary funding source for the state’s ongoing infrastructure needs. Such a cut would have been catastrophic and delayed work on key projects such as the Broadway Extension/I-44 and the Crossroads Project (I-240 and I-35). However, a more positive outcome was achieved under the final FY18 state budget agreement, which includes a significant reduction to the

Chamber criminal justice reform measure signed into law The Greater OKC Chamber’s Criminal Justice Task Force, comprised of business leaders, elected/appointed officials and members of the local law enforcement and legal communities, recommended two bills to be considered by the Legislature this session. One of the measures, SB 342, was signed into law by Gov. Fallin on May 25. SB 342 will create a task force to assess existing laws, policies and practices related to fines, fees and costs assessed on those interacting with the criminal justice system to determine the impact on jail and prison populations. Tourism Development Act signed into law Gov. Fallin signed HB 2131, The Tourism Development Act, into law on May 3. This incentive program was repealed in 2014 after it provided financing assistance to the developers of the 21C Museum Hotel. The Chamber strongly supported reinstatement of this program, which will allow a portion of the sales tax generated by new tourism destinations—such as the First National Center and the Convention Center Hotel in Oklahoma City—to be used as a tax credit

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ROADS fund, but maintains its $59.7 annual off-the- top payment and $575 million funding cap. Therefore, ODOT’s current 8-year plan, which includes a historic number of OKC-area projects, will be protected and all current projects will continue to proceed toward completion. The Chamber also strongly opposed a cut to rail funding which appeared in the General Appropriations bill the last week of session. This cut would have jeopardized the Future of the Heartland Flyer.The Chamber worked during the last week of session with ODOT, the City of OKC and transportation appropriations committee chairs, Sen. Stephanie Bice (R-Oklahoma City) and Rep. Dustin Roberts (R-Durant), to amend the General Appropriations bill to restore funding to the Heartland Flyer and keep the opportunity open for future connections to the national Amtrak system. Improvements to A-F school report cards signed into law The Chamber has historically supported meaningful K-12 accountability and performance assessment systems including the A-F school report cards. Therefore, the Chamber supported HB 1693, which was signed

into law by Gov. Fallin on April 28. HB 1693 will improve the current grading system through more valid and reliable measurements. The law will also require collection of valuable information about school progress in certain areas such as performance on assessments, graduation rates, school safety, student engagement and postsecondary readiness. Lawsuit filed challenging cigarette fee On June 7, Phillip Morris USA and local residents and businesses filed a lawsuit that challenges the constitutionality of SB 845, which added a $1.50-per- pack cigarette fee to wholesalers. If the bill is ruled unconstitutional at its August hearing, its projected revenue of $215 million would be removed from the budget and lawmakers would have to implement cuts or attend a special session to generate additional revenue. The Chamber is monitoring the issue and will continue to represent the interests of business should a special session be called.

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FAST FORWARD

FLASH BACK

Oklahoma City’s Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center (MMAC) has been an important part of the U.S. Department of Transportation and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) since its opening in 1946. The work of the MMAC includes training air traffic controllers, keeping federal aviation records and conducting aviation research through the various services. In 1943, Oklahoma City had just seen the successful opening of an air depot and an aircraft production facility to help with the war effort (see page 2). These two successful projects had opened the door for Civil Aeronautics Administration (which was later replaced by the FAA) to recognize the value of centralizing their operations in order to increase efficiency – and Oklahoma City’s track record of success made it an obvious choice. By the end of World War II, Oklahoma City was the front-runner for the project. In addition to its central location, Oklahoma City was an attractive location to officials due to the large Army space west of Will Rogers

Airport that was left vacant after the war. In June 1946, the Standardization Center and its 50 employees from Houston relocated to Oklahoma City, starting MMAC’s more than 70-year history in the Oklahoma City community. After the first relocation, others followed and the center continued to grow. MMAC drew students from all over the world for aviation classes in Oklahoma City. And the growing popularity of aviation caused MMAC to continually expand. By 1957, the center built its first permanent building, which opened on the 20th anniversary of the CAA. Over 70 years later, MMAC continues to break barriers in the world of flight. MMAC works as the support facility for the entire FAA and the U.S. Department of Transportation. The center’s services include the Enterprise Service Center, the FAA Academy and the FAA Logistics Center. MMAC is one of two centers that support all five aspects of FAA oversight: airports, the Air Traffic Organization, aviation safety, commercial space transportation and security/hazardous materials safety.

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Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center - FAA

Today, MMAC is one of two FAA centers that support all five aspects of FAA oversight.

MMAC employs 3,600 people and educates more than 1,000 students annually. When combined with the contractors located at the facility, MMAC has approximately 6,300 employees and students on its campus, with a $1.65 billion economic impact. MMAC provides a concentrated space for pilots, educators and trainees from all over the world to gather and advance

aviation research and build upon the foundations of the FAA. Its body of work includes providing supply chain management and support services to the FAA, conducting aerospace medical research and training, and providing safety approvals for high-fidelity spaceflight operations and processes.

SPECIAL THANKS TO THE 2017 TOTAL RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT CAMPAIGN SPONSORS.

C A M P A I G N P R E S E N T E R

s i g n a t u r e e v e n t s p o n s o r s

L e a d e r s h i p e v e n t S p o n s o r S

n e t w o r k i n g e v e n t s p o n s o r s

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M A J O R S p o n s o r s

aHepalinkCompany

C o r p o r a t e S p o n s o r s

Bank SNB Centennial Bank Everest Bros. The Funk Companies

Gulfport Energy Corporation Jones P.R. Levelland Productions, LLC

Manhattan Construction Company McAfee & Taft Midlands Management

R.K. Black, Inc. Remington Park Racing Casino United Mechanical, Inc.

Chickasaw Nation Department of Tourism Cool Greens Cornerstone Development, LLC Eskridge Lexus Of OKC First Fidelity Bank Heritage Place, Inc. KPMG LLP s u p p o r t i n g S p o n s o r s

Ackerman McQueen ADG, PC BKD CPAs & Advisors Bockus Payne Associates Architects Capstone Construction Services Central Oklahoma Habitat for Humanity Chicago Title

National Reining Horse Association Phillips Murrah, PC The Professional Basketball Club, LLC - Oklahoma City Thunder Riverwind Casino SONIC, America’s Drive-In Trochta’s Flower’s & Garden Center Voya Financial Advisors

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ECONOMIC INDICATORS

OKC Ranks No. 2 for Best Places for Families

• The zip code 73170, located in south Oklahoma City, ranked high in both school quality and housing affordability, resulting in the Oklahoma City metro being ranked No. 2. • HomeUnion analyzed neighborhoods with the most affordable homes and highest-ranked public schools. • HomeUnion shows that homes purchased within these zip codes will see property values increase faster than others in their metro.

2017’s Best Places for Families School Quality & Housing Affordability

Metro

Zip Code

School Quality Rank

Housing Affordability

Kansas City

64014

88.5

$159,700

Oklahoma City

73170 63026 33496 60503 46112 44147 19044 30519 43065

89.6 81.1 87.9 81.9 86.3 87.1 84.2 86.5 86.1

$165,000 $167,000 $167,500 $168,000 $184,100 $200,000 $217,500 $220,000 $229,500

St. Louis

Palm Beach

Chicago

Indianapolis Cleveland Philadelphia

Atlanta

Columbus

Source: HomeUnion, 2017

For comprehensive Economic Indicators and Regional Data, please visit your Greater Oklahoma City Chamber Economic Development Division www.greateroklahomacity.com/economicindicators or contact Eric Long, Research Economist – (405)297-8976; elong@okcchamber.com

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GRAND OPENINGS

Ribbon-cutting ceremonies are a great member benefit. If your company wants to celebrate a new location, expansion or renovation, contact Amanda Bowen, abowen@okcchamber.com or 405-297-8961. To view more photos, see the schedule of upcoming Grand Openings or subscribe to the Grand Openings calendar, visit www.okcchamber.com/grandopenings.

MassMutual Oklahoma 1300 N. Walker Ave., Suite 200 Oklahoma City, OK 73103

The Manhattan OKC 210 Park Ave., Suite 150 Oklahoma City, OK 73102

Jenny Craig 8545 N. Rockwell Ave. Oklahoma City, OK 73132

Crescent Medical, PLLC 3727 NW 63rd St. Oklahoma City, OK 73116

Concentra Urgent Care 200 S. Quadrum Drive Oklahoma City, OK 73108

Salata 12220 N. MacArthur Blvd., Suite A Oklahoma City, OK 73162

An investment in Human Capital Your organization’s employees are among its greatest assets. Putting the OU Medicine YourHealth program to work for you can help promote better health and increase retention of these valued employees. Find out how the YourHealth program can help your organization decrease healthcare costs, reduce absenteeism, increase productivity and decrease sick leave through the following programs: • Physician-guided health screening • Health risk appraisal • Health audit • Wellness navigator • Executive physicals • On-site health clinic • Wellness portal

Oklahoma City Boathouse Foundation New Bridge 800 Riversport Drive Oklahoma City, OK 73129

www.oumedicine.com/yourhealth For more information, call (405) 271-2455 or visit

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Chamber, Tinker Have Long History of Cooperation

In June 1938, a chance landing of an Army Air Corps bomber at Will Rogers Airport changed the course of Oklahoma City’s history. In that plane was Lt. Col. Robert Olds, commander of the Second Bombardment Group at Langley Field, Virginia. The unusual sight of a bomber in Oklahoma City caused a stir, and the Chamber manager Stanley Draper welcomed Olds at the airport to satisfy his curiosity. From that initial meeting and the conversation that followed, a vision was born. Olds pointed out that Oklahoma City was in an ideal spot to serve as a permanent air depot, halfway between military fields in California and Virginia. After a decade of economic depression, Chamber leaders saw an opportunity that could usher Oklahoma City into a decade of recovery. As the United States monitored the growing unrest in Europe leading up to World War II, the U.S. government began issuing defense contracts, and Oklahoma City began to lose population to cities that had acquired defense work. In addition to securing $3 million in defense contracts by the end of 1940, the Chamber asked firms and individuals to contribute money to secure land that would be used for military expansion in Oklahoma City. By December 1940, a group of Chamber members formed the Industries Foundation with $294,000 in trust. With those funds, the group purchased 1,219 acres adjacent to a municipal airport for a U.S. Army Air Base. The Chamber’s preemptive work put Oklahoma City on the short list of locations the Army was considering for an air depot location. In February 1941, the government asked the Chamber to submit a proposal for the project, with details about labor availability, housing, utility services, area transportation and services that a large base needed. Because the Industries Foundation had acquired the land previously, and because Oklahoma City residents had approved bonds to finance part of the construction, most of the requirements were met on the spot. However, Muskogee, Okla., and Wichita, Kan., both emerged alongside Oklahoma City as front runners for the depot.

In March 1941, Air Corps officials visited the sites in order to determine the best location, and they favored Wichita. Still, they presented a stringent list of requirements that Oklahoma City had to meet before they could be awarded the depot, thinking that it would be impossible. Through cooperation between local, county and state governments, and much to the surprise of the military leaders, Oklahoma City was able to deliver on every demand. On April 8, 1941, Oklahoma City was rewarded with a U.S. Army Air Depot and all the future growth that came with it. By October 1942, the depot employed 14,292 people. Around the time of the air depot’s opening, the U.S. military announced plans to strategically locate three aircraft production plants in the middle of the country. Chamber representatives then pursued that option, feeling that it was the perfect complement to the defense work being done at the depot. City and Chamber leaders again worked to fulfill a list of prerequisites, including increasing the pipeline of qualified workers by encouraging residents to apply for defense work. This campaign was so effective that the Chamber’s secretary enrolled in night courses in mechanics and left the Chamber for Douglas Aircraft shortly after. The new manufacturing plant was under construction by July 1942. By April 1943, C-47s were rolling off the line in record numbers. When the war ended, the Army took over the manufacturing plant to make it a major aircraft maintenance center, a decision that continues to reap economic benefits for the Greater Oklahoma City region to this day.

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WELCOME NEW MEMBERS

A+ Fitness, LLC Fitness Centers & Training Mr. Roderick Benman............ 810-5386 6051 N Brookline Ave., Suite 137 Oklahoma City, OK 73112-4273 www.getaplusfit.com

Advantage Bank Midwest City Location Banks Ms. Danita A. Rose................ 419-1000 10100 SE 15th St.

The Barrel Restaurants Mr. Dave Attalla.................... 525-6682 4308 N Western Ave. Oklahoma City, OK 73118-5418 www.barrellokc.com Belle Isle Restaurant & Brewing Co. Restaurants Mr. David Riesenberg............ 840-1911 50 Penn Place

Midwest City, OK 73110 www.advantagebank.biz

Accident Injury Management (AIM) Attorney Support & Services Mr. Bart Terrell.............(855) 432-1246 5909 Northwest Expressway, Suite 300 Oklahoma City, OK 73132 www.accidentinjury.management Advanced Restoration & Contracting, LLC Fire & Water Damage Restoration Ms. Jessica Hernandez.......... 706-8294 1125 SE Grand Blvd., Suite 101 Oklahoma City, OK 73129 www.advancedrestorers.com

Advantage Battery Batteries Mr. Richard Swearingen........ 787-0033 612 N Rockwell Ave. Oklahoma City, OK 73127 www.advantagebatteryok.com Air Systems and Pump Solutions, LLC Pumps & Compressors Mr. Randy Davis.................... 512-5100 3200 S Ann Arbor Ave. Oklahoma City, OK 73179-7632 www.aspsoklahoma.com

1900 Northwest Expressway Oklahoma City, OK 73118 www.belleislerestaurant.com

Bill Parsons Commercial Insurance Insurance Mr. Bill Parsons..................... 833-4860 7428 NW 106th St. Oklahoma City, OK 73162

Asset Management

Personal Trust

Employee Retirement Plans

Investment Consulting

“ Invest in tomorrow. InvesTrust today. ”

(405) 843-7177 investrust.com

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Blue Note Lounge Bars / Taverns Mr. Dave Attalla.................... 434-8832 2408 N Robinson Ave. Oklahoma City, OK 73103-4322 www.bluenoteokc.com Bottle Notes Wine Bar Restaurants Mr. Jay Listen........................ 285-5859 1201 NW 178th St., Suite 106 Edmond, OK 73012 Amusement / Entertainment / Attractions Mr. Chad Niblett.................... 731-9192 2501 W Memorial Road, Suite 227 Oklahoma City, OK 73134-8044 www.breakoutgames.com/oklahoma-city Byers Creative Advertising / Marketing Ms. Angela Byers.........(918) 949-3399 101 Park Ave., Suite 1300 Oklahoma City, OK 73102-7216 www.byerscreative.com

Carlton ShowBiz, Inc. Trade Shows, Expositions & Fairs Mr. Bob Loudermilk......(316) 299-8272 708 Fox Hill Drive Edmond, OK 73034 www.carltonshowbiz.com Catch 21, Inc. Financial Services Ms. Rebecca St. Germain...... 701-8111 1218 W Rockcreek Road

Commonplace Books Book Stores Mr. Ben Nockels.................... 551-1715 1325 N Walker Ave. Suite 138 Oklahoma City, OK 73103 www.commonplacebooksokc.com Communication Federal Credit Union Credit Unions Mr. Jason Leach.................... 879-5600 3401 SW 104th St. Oklahoma City, OK 73159 www.comfedcu.org DSW Designer Shoe Warehouse Retail Ms. Lindsey Coffman............. 759-6216 6339 SW 3rd St. Oklahoma City, OK 73127 www.dsw.com Deep Fork Catering Caterers Mr. David Attalla................... 848-7678

Norman, OK 73069 www.catch21.com

Breakout Operating, LLC DBA Breakout Games - Oklahoma City

Cheapest Auto Insurance Insurance Mr. Kyle Wilson...................... 604-3849 1014 SW 59th St. Oklahoma City, OK 73109-4903 www.aautoandhomeinsurance.com/oklahoma-city-ok

Classen View Veterinary Clinic Veterinarians - D.V.M. Dr. Matthew Clark................. 525-8868 2301 N Classen Blvd. Oklahoma City, OK 73106

Defining Medicine Life is precious, so there is no room for complacency when treating illness.at’s why the teamat OUMedicine works tirelessly to better understand disease – and discover cutting-edge ways to beat it.

OU Medical Center | OU Physicians | The Children’s Hospital | OU College of Medicine | oumedicine.com

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Board of Advisors Deep Fork Group Restaurants Mr. Dave Attalla.................... 650-3823 7320 NW 109th St. Oklahoma City, OK 73162 Lead Investor DIGI Security Systems Security Control Systems & Service Mr. Scott Simpson................. 531-0073 116 E Sheridan Ave., Suite 107C Oklahoma City, OK 73104 www.digiss.com DIGI Security Systems Security Control Systems & Service Mr. Scott Simpson................. 531-0073 2603 N Shields Blvd. Moore, OK 73160 www.digiss.com DIGI Security Systems Security Control Systems & Service Mr. Scott Simpson........(918) 824-2520 5411 S125th E Ave., Suite 303

The Drum Room Restaurants Mr. Dave Attalla.................... 604-0990 4309 N Western Ave.

Esca Vitae Bakeries Mr. Donald Mills.................... 601-0402 1114 Classen Drive Oklahoma City, OK 73103-2608 www.escavitae.com Exodus Photography Photographers Mr. Rick Cotter...................... 623-7943 11870 Spencer Jones Road Jones, OK 73049-7110 www.exodusphotography.com Board of Advisors Farmers Bank Bank Services Mrs. Tonya Robertson...(580) 654-2265 31 W Main Carnegie, OK 73015 www.farmersbankok.com Kennemer and Council, LLC Home Improvement / Remodeling / Repairs Mr. Kole Kennemer.......(580) 821-2854 711 W Broadway Ave. Elk City, OK 73644-5217

Bronze

Oklahoma City, OK 73118 www.drumroomokc.com

Drunken Fry Bars / Taverns Mr. Dave Attalla.................... 286-1939 5100 Classen Circle Oklahoma City, OK 73118 Jim Dunlap Consultants, LLC Government Relations Mr. Jim Dunlap...................... 361-5399 11201 Hillsdale Drive Edmond, OK 73013-0471 www.dunlapconsultants.com Lead Investor Embark Solutions, LLC Real Estate Management Mr. Thom Rychecky............... 595-3203 13002 N Broadway Extension P.O. Box 6666 Edmond, OK 73083 www.embrks.com

Bronze

Bronze

Bronze

Tulsa, OK 74146 www.digiss.com

TOGETHERWE ARE STRENGTHENING OUR COMMUNITY Learn more about how you can get involved at YMCAOKC.ORG

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The Manhattan OKC Restaurants Manager................................ 605-5300

Oklahoma Flooring and Construction Innova- tions, Inc. Flooring Contractors Mr. Dalton Fashik.................. 795-3570 10443 N May Ave., Suite 773 Oklahoma City, OK 73120-2610 www.ofciinc.com

Studio 6 Extended Stay Hotels & Motels Mr. Jesse Brown.................... 737-8851 5801 Tinker Diagonal Midwest City, OK 73110 36th Studio West Salon Company Beauty Salons / Barber Shops / Spas Ms. Shanan Hull.................... 495-2226 6639 NW 36th St. Bethany, OK 73008 www.36thstudiowest.com Lead Investor Threshold, LLC DBA Threshold Climbing + Fitness Fitness Centers & Training Mr. John Tarkington............... 470-3611 6024 Westlake Memorial Pkwy. Oklahoma City, OK 73142 www.thresholdclimbinggym.com Top Quality Doors, LLC Gates & Gate Operating Devices Ms. Selena Belvin................. 579-3667 P.O. Box 720262 Norman, OK 73070 www.topqualitydoors.net

210 Park Ave., Suite 150 Oklahoma City, OK 73102 www.themanhattanokc.com

The Mantel Wine Bar & Bistro Restaurants Mr. Dave Attalla.................... 236-8040 201 E Sheridan Ave.

PDQ Restaurants Mr. Justin Heagerty.......(210) 542-6896 14215 N Pennsylvania Ave. Oklahoma City, OK 73134 www.eatpdq.com Board of Advisors Prime Architects Architects Mr. Gene Lavastida......(866) 226-1394

Oklahoma City, OK 73104 www.themantelokc.com

Bronze

Motel 6 - OKC Airport Hotels & Motels Ms. Kelly A. Verzani............... 946-6662 820 S Meridian Ave. Oklahoma City, OK 73108 www.motel6.com Lead Investor Oklahoma Aviation, LLC Aircraft - Management & Consulting Mr. Shohaib Kassam............. 787-4568 5905 Tulakes Ave., Suite A Bethany, OK 73008 www.okav.co

Bronze

330 W Gray St., Suite 100 Norman, OK 73069-7111 www.prime-arch.com

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Smith Design Company Construction Companies Ms. Erin Smith...................... 431-8606 1011 NW 6th St. Oklahoma City, OK 73106 www.smithdesigncompany.com

• Clerical • • Light Industrial • • Technical • 24 Hour Service • 7 Days a Week (405) 942-8338 www.keystaffi.net

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Triton Foundation Repair Contractors - Foundation Ms. Katie Pickens.................. 437-9031 1038 County St. 2937 Tuttle, OK 73089-3032 www.tritonfoundationrepair.com US Health Advisors Insurance Mr. Ernest Diaz...................... 938-9323 21344 Backhorn Road Edmond, OK 73012-1101 www.ushagent.com/ernestdiaz Victory Property Solutions Real Estate Investment Mr. Roger Godwin.................. 464-0411 5925 NW 49th St. Warr Acres, OK 73122 The Wedge Pizzeria Restaurants Mr. Dave Attala..................... 602-3477 4709 N Western Ave. Oklahoma City, OK 73118 www.thewedgeokc.com

The Wedge Pizzeria Restaurants Mr. Dave Attalla.................... 270-0660 230 NE 1st St. Oklahoma City, OK 73104 www.thewedgeokc.com

Members Upgrade Their Support of the Chamber Board of Advisor and Lead Investor companies play a key role in the Chamber’s work in Oklahoma City. To increase your investment, contact the membership division of the Chamber at 297-8949 or info@okcchamber.com.

Board of Advisors Innov8tive Computer Services

Lead Investor Modular Services Co. Manufacturervs Mr. James A. Walker.521-9923 500 E Britton Road Oklahoma City, OK 73114-7701 www.headwalls.com

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Mr. Gray Delacluyse.608-1122 600 NW 23rd St., Suite 102 Oklahoma City, OK 73103-1464 www.innov8tive.io

2017 OFFICERS

THE POINT! ISSUE #3509 - July 2017 Editorial staff: Kaylee Terracina, Nate Fisher, Cynthia Reid

RHONDA HOOPER Jordan Advertising Chair DAVID RAINBOLT BancFirst Corporation Immediate Past Chair JOHN HART Continental Resources Treasurer BRUCE LAWRENCE

CARL E. EDWARDS Price Edwards & Company Vice Chair, Innovation and Bioscience STEVE HAHN AT&T Oklahoma Vice Chair, Membership JUDY J. HATFIELD, CCIM Equity Commercial Realty, LLC Vice Chair, Military and Aerospace PERCY KIRK Cox Communications Vice Chair, Economic Development BRADLEY W. KRIEGER Arvest Bank Vice Chair, Government Relations TOM J. MCDANIEL American Fidelity Foundation Vice Chair, MAPS Development

JENNY LOVE MEYER Love’s Travel Stops and Country Stores Vice Chair, Marketing and Communications J. LARRY NICHOLS Devon Energy Corporation Vice Chair, Strategic Planning TERESA ROSE CROOK Oklahoma City Community Foundation Vice Chair, Talent and Education NATALIE SHIRLEY Oklahoma State University - Oklahoma City Vice Chair, Convention and Visitor Development ROY H. WILLIAMS, CCE Greater Oklahoma City Chamber President & CEO

Designer: Josh Vaughn

297-8900 thepoint@okcchamber.com www.okcchamber.com www.twitter.com/okcchamber www.facebook.com/okcchamber The Point (ISSN 1075-6264) is published monthly by the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber, 123 Park Avenue, Oklahoma City, OK 73102.

INTEGRIS Health Corporate Secretary CLAYTON I. BENNETT Dorchester Capital Vice Chair, Strategic Planning PETER B. DELANEY Vice Chair, Forward Oklahoma City

e-mail thepoint@okcchamber.com.

Advertising rates upon request. Publisher reserves the right to refuse any advertising.

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