1977

'It

'It

'It

There once was a note ...

Theme/ l

pure and easy . ..

2ITheme

playing so free . ..

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like a breath rippling by . ..

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The note is eternal . ..

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I hear it, it sees me ..

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forever we blend as forever we die.

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ElMS 1977 State University of New York, College at Buffalo

1300 Elmwood Avenue Buffalo, New York 14222 Volume 66

-funded by the mandatory student activity fee under the auspices of the Cultural Artistic Publications Association

8/Title Page

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Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Academics & Graduates . . . . . . . . 54 On the Side 152 Events

210 245 251

Index . Epilogue

Table of Contents/ 9

own insignificance, and so pitifully incomplete in terms of their own self-awareness. The dilemma becomes a fear; the fear to pursue oneself any deeper, for soon certain frightening things become evident. Happiness is naivete, and too transient to be considered the most desirable of all. Nothing is moral nor immoral, just amoral. The Hope that the dilemma will no longer perplex is not only a transparent moral obligation to society, but also an outright lie' Just where does that leave us? With a conflicting choice. We undeniably choose between the instinct of physical survival as it conflicts with the subconscious to conscious drive of self destruction. Henceforth, "the examined life is not worth living!" What does that accomplish though? The choice is a means, and again an absurd hope to escape the dilemma. So in essence, it is the same; a circle with the endpoint actually the point of origin - to us anyway, for death to be sure, is only inevitable, and all hope is absurd, yet the only alternative. And what of the Perfect Note? Between us Pete, (for no one else is listening,) you were both right and wrong all along. "Such was the note - Pure and Easy .. " Peter Townshend– Songwriter and lead guitarist of The Who, And a member of the Existential Pub Hall of Fame

"There once was a note Pure and Easy ..." -Po Townshend Hold on a second there Pete. You're telling me that since music is a universal, meaning that all cultures, in fact each individual likes some form of music, then there is one under· lying, hence perfect note that would appeal to everyone. Such a note you say, would be Pure and Easy. It certainly sounds good, particularly if you exclude Disco. But let's carry it a bit further. Your friend and mine, Hank Thoreau, said that when he listens to music he fears nothing; he is invulnerable. Automatically music is then transcended into a feeling, and since it is so universal, an expression of such feelings. I'm sure you would agree with this. Now we are on to something. Accepting both your premise and mine, we can logically conclude that the perfect note is one underlying feeling within us all. You claim it is Pure and Easy. If I accept this, then I cannot accept any underlying con· cept as the point of origin (that is, "there once was,") for if it is perfect, then it is complete, hence no need for this delusion we call existence and furthermore, no purpose to the expres· sion of such feelings through music or anything else. Well, then what must we consider to find the perfect note? You were onto it Pete when you tried to test nearly 1,000 people and write a song for each one of them. The only trouble was that ultimately, one must test oneself. In his classic defense, our mutual friend Socrates said that "the unexamined life is not worth living," as he rationalized his own need to question, his need to know. Back to that in a second Pete, but first I want to know what you discovered about those people. What did they have in common? Dilemma, was it not? Insecurity; perplexed by their

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12/ The City

The City/ 13

14/The City

It's alway.; been the same old story Ever since the world began Everybody's got to run for glory Nobody stops to scrutinize the plan.

-P.Simon

The C;ty/ 15

16/The Oty

The City/ I 7

OZZIE'S LAUNDROMAT

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"

18/The City

• L&J ~

o o

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When [was young and they packed me off to school and taught me how not to play the game, [ didn't mind if they groomed me for success or if they said that [was just a fool.

- I. Anderson

20/The Campus

The Campus/ 21

Well I'm no hero That's understood All the redemption I can offer, girl Is beneath this dirty hood With a chance to make it good somehow

Hey what else can we do now? Except roll down the window And let the wind blow back your hair

-B. Springsteen

22/ The Campus

,

The Campus/ 23

24/The Campus

ea.

The Campus/ 25

26/The Campus

I'm singing this note 'cause it fits in well with the way I'm feeling.

- P. Townshend

28(The People

The People/ 29

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30fThe People

The People/ 31

32/The People

"thoughts like the restless sea my many thoughts swell and break on the bank of my mind."

People/ 33

Our roving ELMS reporter traveled the campus in search of the answers to some vital current Questions. Here follows a sampling of the Questions and the replies she received:

Why?

"Why, why? Why, college?"

"Why what?"

"Because of depression and poverty."

"'Cause it comes after 'x',"

"Because my mother told me."

"It's the best of two evils."

"I have nothing else to do."

Where does the light go when you tum off the lamp?

"It dies,"

"All the dark ones come into the room."

"It gets dark."

"It goes and hides in the wall until it turns on again."

"It hides behind the light."

"Into the sky."

"Usually in the brightest spot."

"It's never there?"

"It disappears."

"Very alone."

"Away."

"Out."

Is it possible to clap with only one hand?

"If two people are clapping."

"These are impossible."

"Depends if it's severe enough."

"You could use someone else's hand."

"Yeah, I do it all the time."

34/ Peopie

Where does your lap go when you stand up? "It stretches." "Nowhere. Into my thighs." "Actually, it disappears." "By golly, I believe Canada." "In all directions." "Down." "Out the window." "It falls to the floor. " "It ... I don't know. It just takes on another How high is up? "Depends on how high you are." "Tl..Vice as far as down." "As high as five bottles. Four or five bongs." "As high as you think." "It's your tum --. Hiqh." "Depends on what state of mind you're in." "Infinite." "Higher than down." "Very," uTen feet." "As high as you want it." "Above your eyes." Is there intelligent life on Earth? "I thought so until about five minutes ago." "Uh·huh." "Debatable." "At Buff State we know there isn't." "Some· where in Newark, New Jersey, maybe." "I hope so." "Humm, no. Only if you get a doctorate." "Barely. Right there." "Are you kidding me?" "Relative to the Universe, no." "Uh, very little." "I've never come across any," "That's tough. Forget it." "After reading this article, don't you know?" form."

People/ 35

"You are free before the sun of the day, and free before the stars of the night; and you are free when there is no sun and no moon and no star. You are even free when you close your eyes upon all there is. But you are a slave to him whom you love because you love him, and a slave to him who loves you be– cause he loves you."

36/ Peopie

)

...

,

\ ~

I • , , , , . ,

I

. • 1

.

,

Did you know that graffiti was one of the most creative types of writing on this campus? Well, even if you did, read on for gems of wisdom. Like - why do people write on bathroom walls? the answer - Why did you? and still another reply -I'm taking a survey. Then there's the "prophetic" statements: Why don't people write on this side of the wall? Christopher was asking the astronomer, "Can your telescope tell me where the sun goes? " Euell Gibbons is alive and living under Lackawanna. Be like a bee and eat your honey. Down with Virginity! If I could be you, and you could be me for just one hour If we could find a way to get inside each others mind If you could see me through your eyes instead of your ego, I believe you'd be surprised to see that you've been blind ... The Butt Sisters: Bertha, Beulah, and Half-a-, are taking over the world! WATCH OUT!!!!

Of course, poets can think up some meaningful poems: Iwent to Mass Ilayed a gas.

They promised to find What was in my behind. If you sprinkle while you tinkle, please be neat and wipe the seat. My dog turned, looked at me and said "Ya better head over to Tennessee Jed."

Dear Abbey appears on the scene every once in awhile: What do you dowhen you fall in love with a man that's gay?

Answer: Find a third (bisexual) and all go to bed! I haven't been laid in a month what should I do? Answer: Sell your body!

And finally, the unquotable quotes: Gay stall, political stall two doors down, and religion stall to the right. Hi. The whole world is batty. Where's the toilet paper? Tum on' Turn on to Jesus!'! Why do the cleaning ladies clean the walls? We only write on them anyway. I think the elevator is stuck. The government should buy new toilet seats ... ... . And soon.

Graffiti writers will never keep the cap on their pens so count on being philosophically enriched forever!

38/ Features

Crossword Puzzle

Across

l. Faculty Student Association (abbr.). 4. Editor of 1977 Elms. 11.

hall (puts on theatrical productions).

18. The school newspaper. 31. This organization brings you the Sunday night movies (abbr.).

36. Where one goes to get inebriated. 40. The school's only radio station. 44. The Spanish organization. 48 . Title of some professors. 54. Where to get the best food on campus. 71. To write down what one sees. 83. Where the Math department hangs out. 90. Where students hang out during classes. Down 1. Where the Commuter Council hangs out. 4. Where a student on campus resides. 7. What Charles Ash Jr. is president of (abbr.). 8. Omega Nu; Kappa Delta ____ 11. The rowing team 28. Where the studious students hang out. 30. Where the students' money goes. 53. Dr.- Fretwell 58. Dean of the Arts and Humanities. 106. Inter-residence Council (abbr.). 109. What the parking lots are full of.

61. What Miss Turton runs. 77. A graduating person. 83. The cafeteria in the union. 85. Sigma Tau

. Pi Kappa ___

Features/ 39

Directions

Object: To end up where you started.

Playing Pieces: Anything can be used as a playing piece, an old checker, a deodorant can top, etc.

To Play: Commuters start in the Parking Lot and dormies start in Tower II. You can use a deck of cards to determine the number of spaces to be moved. Take out the cards one through six and draw from the pile. If an ace is drawn, move one. If a two is drawn move two, etc. The same idea can be used with a die. You must land on your destination with the exact number.

40/ Features

A Day in the Life ofaStudent at Buffalo State

Need a book In theJlblmymove toLlbnIl/.

Y... _ ..... _ 8IIIdeId J.D• ............ taJoe ... _tum.

PId< up a girl In the Pub but ..... herphone- ...... atum.

Your ... _ cancelled. move to Pub.

Got thr-..In the oI-.r during a dorm party. ~ there.

lbe _ decIdeI tolhlne.cut'" IIIId IIU"jW.d.

Features/ 41

Do You Live In Your Car?

es, this commuter has a friendly place to go: his place of (volunteer) employment. After classes are over for the day, the real work begins. Plans are made and discard– ed, organizational meetings are held and political bargains are made. Somewhere around midnight, after a beer or six in the Pub, the involved commuter joins the ranks of his fellow men, and heads home. So ends our saga of the commuter at Buffalo State. Of course, there's always the "I can't stand living at home" com– muter, and the "get me out of this school" commuter, but that's a different story.

Some commuters walk, some hitchhike, some ride bicycles while others take the old stance at the bus stop. Some individuals are lucky enough to own a car, at least until they have to park them. The average commuter arrives on cam– pus at 7:15 AM to dodge potholes and find the closest possible parking spot. He then heads for the Pier to drink dishwater coffee and eat day-old baked goods. Class– es start and the commuter usually attends, unless he gets into a scintillating conversa– tion. Most commuters leave campus ap– proximately three minutes after their last class ends. The working commuter has a slightly

different situation. Arriving on campus five minutes late for his first class, the working commuter must then decide whether to change out of his uniform and be ten minutes late, or go to class with it on and endure the stares. Deciding usually to change, this commuter then invariably finds that his closet (the back seat of his car) is missing an essential item: a shoe, a shirt, his jeans. _. Making the best of a bad situation, the working commuter final– ly gets to class, where he is able to relax .. at last. Another out-of-the ordinary commuter is the involved commuter. Instead of head– ing for a lounge or the Pier between class-

Features/ 43

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44/ Features

Pure and Easy Strikes the Donns by Bennett Davis When I was once a little boy I came upon the revelation that somehow and in some way I would like my life to be pure and easy. I struggled, grasped and clawed my way through life for a decade of years; longing, searching and gnawing for my only break– through to a life so pure and easy. It came upon me one day as I was search– ing in the spiritual world for something that was really present in the realms of reality_ I kicked myself in the fanny and off to Buffalo I trotted. I stumbled around the streets of Buffalo always questioning bypassers about where I might find a life so pure and easy. They shrugged their shoulders, smiled, and said, "in the dorms, young man everyone knows that." So, being confident that the Buffalo populous pointed me in the right direction I flew to the SUCB campus. I ran down corridors and jutted in offices till I proudly displayed myself and belched out "Please, I beg of you, let me live in the dorm so my life may be pure and easy." And so it was. Iwas finally on my way! I packed what little material objects I had, (a pair of jeans and a flannel shirt), held my head up high and strutted through those huge glass doors. Already I was beginning to feel pure and easy. The dorm director greeted me with a smile and took me to my room. I swung open the door, opened my eyes, and saw bare walls and a bed frame. "Is this pure and easy?" I said. The dorm director just smiled and strolled down the hall. How could this cubed mass of plaster be pure and easy? Can I live like this? People came by and said hi with a suspi– cious smile as if to say "what do you think you're doing in this hole?" I really didn't know how to react since no one was happy and everyone complained constantly about the world that I had dreamed about for so many years. Broken furniture, broken mirrors, bare hallways, barren rooms, but it was all fine to me - I was living the life I wanted and was happy. People said to me "Why don't you be like us and hate this place, come on, everyone hates this place, join the crowd" "No, I said with a smile, this is my home, this is beauty, you are beauty, we are all pure and easy." And so life went on: they in their way and me in mine and I never stopped believing, hoping and praying that they would see that as soon as they became happy in their own world that all worlds become oh so pure and oh so easy.

Features/ 45

Name: Troy Donohue Home: Teenage Wasteland Age: Old enough to know better, young enough to still try. Hobbies: Jack Daniels, bourbon, scotch, Coors, women, & anything illegal or immoraL Last Book Read: How to Pick Up Girls. Quote: "I don't really remember, but I musta had a good time!" Last Accomplishment: Getting the quote out Profile: OJ extraordinaire. The AlI·American Kid. Con· forming to the highest moral standards through a haze of alcohol and endless chain of women. Author of "The Adventures of Troy", movie star and ghost writer of all the old surf records. Responsible for the spread of Troitis throughout all of Hi·Rise. Beer: Boy Howdy! Bella Abzug

Following a presentation at U.B. on Friday, October 22nd, congresswoman Bella Abzug showed up at Buffalo State to campaign for Jimmy Carter. The first representative from either party to cam· paign on our campus, she addressed a rather unruly Union crowd. Besides backing Carter, she answered questions and contended admirably with the in· creasing noise in the room as well as those students who wanted her to listen to them. Later, stating her views, she remarked that there were about 300 students who really listened to what she had to say. Although her visit was unexpected, her appearance and man· ner were in typical fonn. "Women are not only this country's greatest untapped natural resource, they're also not going to stay hidden away foreuer. They're bursting through in a thousand rich gushers eueryday. If they make it, we'll all make it. We're in this together." -Alan AIda

46/Features

Dr. Fretwell's reorganization plan can be best described by a quotation found in Alvin Eurich's Campus 1980: "No one know.; how dinosaurs became extinct We only know that some things changed and dinosaurs did not." Buffalo State does not want to be the proverbial dinosaur, so the changes that Dr. Fretwell proposed in April 1976 have taken place. The reorganization covered many areas and affected many people. Eight percent of the College's staff and faculty have lost their jobs. Positions open through retire– ment or resignation are not being ftlled. The academic structure changed to three faculties from five. Due to budgetary and other reasons, the number of departments was reduced to approximately 25. The administrative duties of policy and planning, adminisnative affairs, and student affairs were also redeSigned. During the summer, faculty and administration offices started being relocated. People were moved out of Rock– well and Cassety Halls to different campus locations. Bishop Hall was reopened to accommodate some of these people. Offices in Grover Cleveland also moved to promote cohesiveness and efficiency among the staff. Cassety Hall was turned into a "second" Student Union by having most of the student organization offices moved into the basement and first floor of the Hall. The other major change was the redistribution of peo– ple to different positions. Dr. Kury, former Dean of Hu– manities and Social Sciences, has become Dean of Graduate Studies and Research. Dr. Williams, formally Dean of Graduate Studies and Research, is now Dean of Applied and Professional Studies. The entire structure of the Maintenance Department has been reorganized. Several other changes of the same nature have been made. The changes outlined by Dr. Fretwell have, for the most part, taken place. The proposed changes in departmental structure caused Criminal Justice Majors to picket Grover Cleveland Hall, but on the whole a spirit of cooperation has prevailed. We have yet to see if it is a change for the better.

In these years of the struggling seventies one word has come out of the heavens and descended upon our lives with greater consistency and frequency than any other. The word is cut– backs. Buffalo State College, leading the state school system in many respects, also presents itself as one of the top contenders in this category. Cutbacks, as the motivator of this all college meeting, was not the topic of discussion. Rather a new plan , a new hope. and a new future were determined by Dr. Fretwell and pre– sented to the college. Specifically SUCB will now have less departments; forty down to twenty-four. Some have vanished, some have merged, while others have vanitized their names or remained the same. For your own sanity consult your local listings. This concept of streamlining departments, as uncomplicated as it appears, will lead to the development of a whole new cur– riculum, course outline, and set of degrees and programs. A new form of departmental lingo will be created and then trans– ferred into a revised college catalog. The new functionalism was but one part of this All College Meeting. The remainder of the time was used by Dr. Fretwell to discuss trends in education as a whole, and what he con– siders a Buffalo State education to be. Education according to Dr. Fretwell, has become too specif– ic. Rather than having a general college education, students are graduating with specialized degrees for one occupation. Another goal which educators nationally, as well as at SUCB, have set is the return of literacy to the college campus. This is upon directive from the President's office so don't bug your proff about correcting your spelling. The conclusion of the 1977 All College Meeting was on both a philosophic and practical note. Dr. Fretwell called upon facul– ty and students alike to "strive for excellence: We serve none, least of all the students, if standards are minimal and expecta– tions even lower."

I

Features/ 47

Winter in Buffalo by Stephen Brady If the World Series is over, you know it's winter.

With the demise of the beloved Yankees by those ruffians from Ohio, Buffalonians prepare for several long months of shoveling, salting, sliding, falling and general discomfort. Hockey has started, and our local heroes, the Sabres, are well on their way to another season of losses to the Broad Street Bullies and upset wins over Les Canadiens. Local pro basketball is also underway, and the Braves' season is expected to bounce up and down as much as the ball. Football fans, waiting for the end of a too long season, should prepare to see juice freeze in the middle of an end sweep, and the "electric company" may be in for a major power shortage. For those of you new to Buffalo weather during the dark side of the year, there are several tidbits of information that this veteran of Western New York winters will pass on to prepare you for the onslaught of the white blankets. To those of you with cars, be forewarned that the campus parking lots are not moved closer to the building during winter. Unless your platform shoes have studs, you should invest in a pair of steel-belted radial snowshoes. Anyone living at home or in an apartment in Buffalo, make sure your waterbed has a fresh supply of anti-freeze, unless you like to ice skate in the bedroom. Accu-Weather predicts a mild winter, so prepare for almost continuous snowfall from October till April. Then again, if you are a ski enthusiast, you may not want to wax your skis because the traditional "snowbelt" usually turns to a summer resort while the flatlands of Buffalo take on the appearance of International Falls, Minnesota in January. Winter in the "armpit of the east" does have a bright side, I think. Christmas is arriving with a jolly "Ho-Ho-Ho" from the Mastercharge people, and the malls and stores are decorating to bring about the traditional plastic image of J. C. Superstar's birth. The dealers of seasonal dribble, the store owners, do us all a favor and display things that do nothing but remind us of warmth ... bikinis, sneakers and baseball equipment. Many people think of winter as a chance for extra days off from school in the form of "snow days." For those of you new to the concept, it does happen, but don't get your hopes up. It took a major ice storm to close the smog-covered halls of Buffalo State last year, and the great weather predictor ... me ... does not see another such occurance until 1985. But I have been known to be wrong ... often. So, as you trudge from building to building dodging the bodies of the dead lost in snowdrifts, take heart. The blue skies of summer are just around the comer ... in Los Angeles ... in Miami ... in Rome ... anywhere but Buffalo. REPRINTED WITH PERMISSION OF TIlE RECORD_ Stephen Brady is the News Editor of the RECORD, and is a senior in the Mass Communications program. He does not live in Buffalo, but rather in the Town of Pendleton, which is close enough to Buffalo ... for anyone. 48/Features

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Features/ 49

"Une" Wins State Competition

Casting Hall's presentation of "line" won first place in the short play category at the New York State Theatre Festival Association. The company was then to be invited to various locations along the Eastern seaboard to perform. This was the first time Casting Hall, representing Section nine, had ever won the New York State competition. In addition, Bob Fitzsimmons, as the beer drinking man who opens the show, was named the runner up for the "best individual performance of a supporting actor" award in the competition. According to Neil Macdonald, president of Casting Hall, almost all schools from across the state and many community theatres attend as well. "line," by Israel Horovitz, was first presented at Buffalo State in the Bishop Hall Black Box Theatre October 15-23, 1976. Directed by Lori McDonald, the play concerned man's frantic compulsion to be first in line. Jane Montgomery, laMar Webster, Doug Crane, and Willie Thompson also starred in the winning production. Social Hall Floor During the rainy summer of 1976 the floor col– lapsed in the Social Hall. The base warped because of improper maintenance and a residue of stale beer. Albany was notified and floor reconstruction was scheduled to be completed by September 1. The floor was ripped apart, but contractors were unable to put in a new one. Another deadline was set for October, but difficulties again prevented it from being met Finally, after four feet of snow, the Social Hall's floor was put down. The new floor is linoleum. This is to prevent another buckling due to constant use and spilled beer. The organizations on this campus were greatly hindered by the floor construction. Many of the organizations were counting on the Social Hall for fund raising events, such as beer blasts, movies, coffee houses and discos. The loss of this facility only proved how necessary it is.

Those who are handicapped Those who are handicapped on this campus suffer from facilities designed for the remainder of the student body_Measures were taken to remedy spe– cific problems. Drinking fountains, previously at an inconvenient height for the people in wheelchairs, were lowered. Tower I was redesigned so living conditions could better meet the needs of the handicapped. In addition, the lack of wheelchair ramps was corrected by the replace– ment of the back door stairs of the student union, with a concrete ramp. Hopefully, alternative revisions will continue to aid the handicapped on campus.

SO/Features

Mountains rising surrounding and protecting

Weare never truly free We all have our hangupsand consciences and society to hold us back. If only we could unlease ourselves just once and run free with open minds we might be able to discover who we really are and to enjoy just being ourselves. moi-meme

Giving Security Trees and Grasses

Flowers and Wildlife

Freeing our souls

moi-meme

Quiet Snow falling lightly kisses the ground and lies silently

clothing the earth in its virgin white muffling the sounds which indicate this bustling city, hushing the rush

of the impatient people, telling us quietly to stop and think and listen to life. moi-meme

Features/ 51

Will You Never Settle?

Gail Masserman

Going from place to place Answering to no one Bending trees to appear old and whisking hats from people's heads How cruel you are when you want attention but how soothing you can be when the sun is blistering relief You keep nature flowing And all those flowers growing Removing the airs of people Who think they're above the clouds

Sitting in my rocking chair poetry book in my lap staring out the window

at the stars snow glistening on the mountain tops.

Your anger lies in storms Your sweetness, in calm

voices call me in the darkness speaking to me through the loneliness of the night

You, the wind,

and smiling, I start to write of their songs.

will remain long after All else is gone.

moi·meme

52/Features

Love is hope ... For

seeing awakening sunrises, deeply coloured sunsets ... living life to its fullest, enjoying every minute ... waking up and finding yourself still in his anns .. . walking in the rain thinking of him ... elation, a feeling of joy, knowing he's thinking of you ... a brighter tomorrow after a radiant today ... . . . together ... Forever.

For

For

For

For

For

. .

'

" - - -; :~ ... ,~. - "

.~

The Window

Gail Massennan I sit and watch through panes of glass

While everything becomes A Mass Of memories and puzzlements from days gone by. A drop falls on the window, but it is A tear or rain - the drop is now a stream, And I still cannot distinguish between them I am secure on the inside looking out but through this window I must climb out, Into A world of uncertainty Where I shall grow become The flerson I see Reflected in the window

Features/ 53

To the Class 011977: In the Book of U Chi, the Chinese philosopher Confucius wrote that "when the Great Principle prevails, mutual con– fidence is promoted and good neighborliness cultivated .. There is no need then for people to shut their outer doors." I hope your experience at Buffalo State has included open– ing the doors of your lives, as well as the windows of your minds and hearts. Sages through the centuries, envisioning the ideal society, have counted on the striving of each new generation to bring the people of the world a few steps closer to that goal. We have long understood that people can best flourish in a spirit of neighborliness and mutual suPJ:lort, qualities which can be developed through our homes, our religious and aesthetic ex– periences, and our academic and related learning. You graduates of 1977, recalling the year of the big snow storms, will be reminded of powers in the world greater than your own. While the forces of nature are very strong, we need to remember that the power of human beings to inspire and help each other can be even greater. Go forward in a spirit of openness and servic€- May the wind be always at your back!

Sincerely,

E. K Fretwell Jr. President

56/ Administration

Colonel Silas R. Maolyneaux, Executive Assistant to the

Mrs. Heidi L Mahoney, Assistant to the President

President

Mr. Earle Y. Hannel, Director College Relations

Dr. James H. Young, Vice President for Policy and Planning

Adminisbation/57

Barbara Frey, the Vice President of Academic Affairs, greeted me early one winter day with a smile and enthusiasm few people ever have. Her undergraduate work was done at Geneseo, she received her Masters in Boston and finally her Doctorate in In· diana. Being responsible for Academic Programs, all Deans must report to her concerning courses and programs. Dr. Frey also governs acceptance and gradua~on standards and is responsible for the governing of monies for programs. She says, however, that others share her responsibility and not all work is done solely by her. Ms. Frey came to Buffalo State at the beginning of the Great Expansion of 1963. She has seen quite a few changes occur. She states that there has been a serious reversal in money and sup· port. Also, then the student population was mainly involved in teacher education. In 1965 Liberal Arts programs were intro· duced and threw off the balance slightly. Now she feels there is much more of a balance between professional and career·oriented students and programs with those interested in a more liberal education. Dr. Frey also states that the school is trying much hard· er to give attention to the urban problems so prevalent in a large city such as Buffalo. For the future she states that she would "like to see the entire campus become a more stimulating intellectual environment. " Our campus, according to Dr. Frey, is "considered by us as the most diversified in the University system." She adds that "of course I'm sure we'd get argument from the others!" Because of this great diversification with such extensive Art, Industrial Arts and Fine Arts departments, a lot of money is neces· sary to run them. Commenting on some cutbacks on campus, she said that so far no entire program had been cut and that most courses cut were ones whose information was carried in some other course. She said that the reason for the cutbacks was not because of less allotted money from the state, but because infla· tion and automatic salary increases for so many on campus leave less money for academic use. Despite all the monetary problems at this time she really enjoys her job and loves all she does. In closing, she stated that "In spite of current situations,we look forward to exciting new possibilities strengthening our existing programs and developing new options for students." by Patty Bell

Dr. Barbara Frey, Vice·President for Academic Affairs

Miss Angela Palmieri, Dean of Student Affairs

Dr. Robert Patterson, Associate Vice·President for Academic Affairs 58/ Administration

James Caputi, Associate Vice·President for Finance and Management

Mr. William Troy, Assistant Vice·President for Student Affairs

Glenn Nellis, Associate Vice·President for Policy and Planning

Daniel Hunter, Jr., Interim Director of Financial Aids

• Dr. Irene Hulicka, Dean of Natural and Social Sciences

Dr. Harry Ausprich, Dean of Arts and Humanities

Administration/ 59

Wendel B. Wickland, Accelerated Programs and Individualized Degree Program

Sheila L Hausrath, Director of Residence Life

Dr. Ralph W. WiUiams, Dean of Applied and Professional Studies

Dr. David B. Walch, Director of Academic Services

Rosalie A. Turton, Director of Alumni Affairs

60/ Administration

Neale W. Peck, Director of Records and Registration

Kevin M. Durkin, Director of Admissions and Records

Richard N. Han, Director Academic Standards and Advisement

JI

..

. ; !.P ...

~. ~ ,),;

/

~

\':}.f Carole S. Harris, Assistant Registrar

Administration/ 61

Richard J. Lecastre. Director of New Student Programs and International Student Affairs

John E. Kennell. Director of Student Activities Jack Kennell has been at Buffalo State since 1969 as Director of Student Activities, Previous to living in Buffalo, he spent len years in Indiana, which he recalls as being rather conservative and having stringently controlled student funds. Here he has noted the great freedom to become involved and be a part of school changes, which he hopes more of the students will take advantage of. (Getting students to take the initiative to start a program with strong support is becoming more apparent. Now we only need cooperation from the admini– stration.) At Buffalo State, his main objectives are to see students involved with deci– sions. and to see students' ideas put forth (to the board of trustees) and into action. The 'open door policy' is established, keeping the liaison between stu– dents and administrators on an informal leveL They are encouraged to drop in with new proposals or old problems,and talk things out. John Kennell has several people working with him. They assist in the areas of Student Union Board, Student Government and a student Information bureau. Under Mr. Kennell's guidance. the Sweet Shop, ticket office, Pub, lock· er rooms and bowling alley have been formed and become regular spots of interest in residents' and commuters' school life. They also reinstated thiS year special items to aid the student - the Minority Cultural Resource Center; free university, allOOling credit free courses; the student activities calendar: and the travel program, allowing students cheaper charter rates at holiday times. There are a fev.! things John Kennell would like to have changed. First, he would like to see a more collegiate atmosphere. Traditions haven't been kept up. Fraternities and sororities are passe. Since athletics is a large and important part of school enthusiasm. he'd like to see them faciliated to their fullest extent. In addition, he \..\Iishes the student would be more aware of what the school can do for him. The extra·cunicular activities are frequent. with a large choice of clubs. U.S.G. programs are usually scheduled during the day (for commuter convenience). Resident and commuter interaction is at a minimum, but he and his staff are working at it. Working with young people doesn't alv.Jays mean success. Jack Kennell has to give of himself to attain his goals, but he enjoys his work. With a job such as this one, it is imperative that one have a good rappert wilh people. and be able 10 relate well with someone who is perhaps a bit younger in age. though not in spirit. 'Here r can retain my youthfulness.' by Joan D. Belinsky

Dr. Isaiah Reid. Director EOP/SEEK

62/ Administration

Dr. Theodore W. Kury. Acting Dean of Graduate Studies and Research

FSA Staff: Row 1: Shelley Moore, Jane Nowak. A1vera Schennerhom, Anne Portale. Row 2: Bill Shephard, Mike Flaherty, Orma Panzica, Ed Michalski. Anne Mortellaro, Joe Drahnak, Mike White, Peter Liberti, Ed Smith.

Sheila J. Nickson, Affinnative Action/ Human Development Officer

Dr. Fedele J. Goi, Director of Counseling

Administration/ 63

Laverne B. Anderson, Director of Security

June H. Truesdale, Director of Placement

Louis J. Kaminski, General Manager, College Store

Dr. Winifred Mernan, Director Student Health Services

6lt/ Administration

(

LUCY MARIE ALESSI

SOLOMON AVO AKANDE

BARBARAANGLE

MICHAEL L ARGUE

JOHN ANTONEW

ABRAHAM ALSTON

MARK S. ANDERSON

DEBRA ASH

PAMELA ARKEN

ANNEARUNGTON

66/Graduates

JOYCE AUSTIOR

ROlANDAumy

WILLIAM AYERS

BARBARA BAINBRIDGE

UNDABAKER

lCRRY LYNN BAlDWIN

JAMES BAlDWIN

VERONICA A BAUCKI

LOmEBARMASH

JENNY BARONE

Graduates/ 67

SUSAN BARRY

DAVID BARTON

KATIiY BAUERS

SUZANNE BAYDER

DOROTIiYBEAMAN

BEVERLYBEANBLOSSOM

SUSAN BECKER

CATIiERlNE BEGLEY

DENlSEBErrz

68/Graduates

CAROL BENJAMIN

AUNDRAYBENN

EILEEN A BENNETI

MINDYR BERGER

JUDI BERENSON

ELLEN BERGMAN

EVAN BERMAN

SlEPHANIE BERMAN

FRANCES BERNAT

ROBERT BIGGIE

JOANBIRO

,

\

RICHARD DAVID BISHOP

UNDA BLASZCZVKIEWlCZ

SUSANBU\lR

DEBBIE A BLESS

CU\lRE BLOCK

Graduates/ 69

Helene Arnone

Donis Closs

Emil Hoch

70/Faculty

other commemorating a couple's 50th wedding anniversary. For the remainder of the leave, Joe Bolinsky plans to do some travelling, claiming it is necessary to make a complete break into a different environment in order to accomplish things. Since he has spent his sabbatical time close to home so far, he has visited and worked at school from time to time, and is consulted occasionally by students for certain problems. Finally, what are his objectives for the remainder of the sabbatical? He wants to continue his work on his more sub· stantial pieces and develop ideas in wood. When teaching, one must necessarily involve oneself with the students and their work, and hopefully his not teaching will liberate more time to do what he desires. Changes during this free time are of tempo and perspective and the absence gives Mr. Bolinsky time to "change gears". He feels the importance is to accelerate one's labors, and looking at his works, I believe he is achieving what he aspires to. by Marian Muranyi

What distinguishes Joseph Bolinsky from the remainder of the faculty at Buffalo State this year is the fact that he is on sabbatical. My interview with him focused on what he has done, planned and hopes to pursue for the duration of his leave of absence. Professor Bolinsky, who studied Fine Arts at the State Uni· versity of Iowa, has been on our staff since 1954. During this time, he took one other leave - spending two years in Rome, Italy, with his family. There he was able to exhibit his works, travel and continue the type of activity he enjoys. This year will be the third that has seen Joseph's studio in Campus school. The larger area provided has proved an excel· lent access for the students to their work and an inspiration for more sizable creative pieces. In his absence, Mr. Joseph Jack· son, a graduate student from U.B., has taken over one of Mr. Bolinsky's classes. The first of his projects this year was to work on two com· mission pieces for Temple Sinai. These kept him from taking on new endeavors. The completed wooden sculptures were 8'h feet high - one in remembrance of a man's death, the

"Courtesy of Courier Express/ Paul Pasquarelo"

SUSAN BOBENREAD

DEBORAHA BLOCK

VICKI BLUMERICK

REBECCA BLO~

MARY E. BOIES

SUSAN BOL1WOOD

I W1WAM BOMBRIA

KAlliLEEN D. BONDS

GAIL BORATIN

KENNElli ARTHUR BOOS

MARGUERITE BORDEAUX

DIANE R BQURHIS

72/ Graduates

MICHAEL BRANCIFORTE

moMASBRADlEY

JANNAL BRACKETT

DONALD C.BRANT

KERRY S. BRENNAN

TERRANCE J. BRENNAN

BErn BRESlJIY

BITIYBROWN

JOANNM. BROWN

JOSEPH BROWN

Graduates/73

,

DONALD RAlPH BUDDE

KATHERINE BURGETT

MAUREEN BUMBERY

NANCY M. BULDAS

AN11iONY BURNS

PAMELA BURTON

CAMILLE BUSH

74/ Graduates

PEGGYCAIN

THEODORA BYNES

VINCE CAITO

DENISE CALlJ\HAN

EILEEN M. CAPS'ffiAW

MANUEL CARABALLO SUSAN ELIZABETH CARLTON

MARGARET CARRICK

MARlA CASSESE

MARK ANTHONY CERONE

AMY CHASANOFF

Graduates/ 75

William Bennett

Howard Sengbusch

Jan Ditzian

John Morganti

76/ Faculty

,

Janie Jenkins

Faculty/ 77

MARTIN CHALMN

SANDRA CHERRY

MARIECHESNICK

1\. ':', '. ' . :. CAROLYN CHISIM

RICHARD CHIORANDO

BARBARA TOBY CHINSKY

EDWARD CIESUK

ANN MARIE CIESLIK

TIMCLAFUN

THOMAS CIRILLO

DAVID M. CUMEK

MATHEW CLARKE

NANCY HELEN CLARKE

JAMES CLARK

DAVID CLARK

78/ Graduates

SUZANNE COlllY

SAMUEL COLEMAN

AUDREY COLE

MARY LOU COLES

JOANNE E. COWER

KAlHERlNE COWNS

DIANE COWER

ANN COLOMBO

CATHY CONNORS

VICTORIA A CONSOU

KATHY CONSTANTINE

SUZANNE COON

GERAlD S. COOKE

Graduates/ 79

ANGELACOSfANZO

DEBORAH J. COOPER

JONETIACorroN

BETIi COWAN

SHIRLEYA CURTIS

MICHAELCURTIN

ROBERTACSONT

DIANE S. OSIZMAR

JOLYNNE CROUT

FERNDANAY

ANDRiENNE D'ALOISE

DIANE J. D'ANTHONY

SO/ Graduates

DESIREE D'ARCANGEUS

GAIL A. DARUSZKA

- ROO DAYTON

FRANKJ. D'AVI>NlATO

ROBERr DAVILA

BErTY M. DAVIS

MARSHADAVIS

EDWARD DEAN

CAROL DEIBEL

PHYLUS o.JOHN

JOHNA DELGROSS

BILL DeLONG

CLAUDE C DeLORRAlNE

Graduates/ 81

MARIO DeMARCHIS

GLENDA DEMBURE

DEBORAH DeMIllE

BEVERLY DENSON

PATRICIA DENHAM

KAREN DENNING

DIANE DeROCHE

KATHY DeSANllS

RICHARD D. DEREN

JOHNDEVICO

MICHAEL REX DEWEESE

82/Graduates

SUSAN DICKERSCN

GEORGE G. DICKEY

FRAN C. DICKSON

DEBRADIER

PAULMURPHY DISCHNER

DANDIOCEDO

LOUISE M. DIPKIN

MELDDEE F. DlS11.ER

DIANE M. [);TOMASSC

MEUSSA DONNER

MICHAEL R DONOHUE

Graduates/83

Mr. Glenn and Mr. Rotella are teachers of Introduction to Human Development (EDU 210). This semester the course was taught with a different approach - field observations - visiting various institutions and observing human interactions and physical settings on an independent basis. Previously, Bob Glenn and Jim Rotella set a week by week schedule, including times and days that each group was to visit each place. They contacted, in addition, each of the institutions to confirm the appointments. Both teachers' classes were com· bined and the students were divided into small groups of 4·5 people, each group having at least one car and driver. All of the groups visited elementary and secondary schools, Day Care and Nursery schools, businesses and factories. Each student kept an individual joumal of the places he visited, and included his reactions and any significant facts about them. Some groups also formed a portfolio of pictures. Along with these observations there were both a required and recommended reading list, and on certain days, class would convene for video· tapes and discussions. Mr. Glenn is planning to continue this approach, although Mr. Rotella does not. Jim feels they attempted field orientations too early - that coordinating the course, keeping communi· cations open, and getting so many students out on the field successfully was much too difficult with such a large group. How· ever, Mr. Glenn feels more positive about the method, his goal for the class being, "A survey of human development through the life cycle with emphasis upon implications for parents and teachers." For those who were in the course, there were some drawbacks. It would happen that many places where visits were scheduled made excuses or were uncooperative at the visitation time. However, there were also some excellent receptions, where students were welcomed and enjoyed an enriching experience. Both of the teachers agree that certain changes should be implemented. Rrst, students should have various alternatives - the traditional lecture class or a combination of classroom and field activities having more general plans, allowing the students to make the final arrangements. In the course of the semester, the teachers allowed students who liked field observations to continue with them. Those who ~. 1 didn't were offered the choice of a lecture class, or a combination of the two. It seems that getting out and seeing the physical and psycholog· ical environment of classrooms, Day Care centers, factories. etc., and allowing the students to write about them in terms of con· ditions and interactions is indeed putting the students on the outside looking in - at what human development is all about. As Mr. Rotella believes, "People learn through different strat· egies - we must accommodate the strongest learning strategies of the individuaL" by Nanci Roberti

GiseleFeal

Monica Brinson

84/Faculty

Joseph Adessa

Faculty/ 85

TERRANCE A. DOOLEN

GERAWINE DORSEY

DONNA DOTIERWElCH

CYl'ITHlA DROSENDA.HL

MARGAAITDROGE

LEO DOYLE

SHERI DuBOISE

RlCHAAD DWYER

RONAlD J. DROZIX)WSKl

GAAYEAGA.N

GREGORY DZIOMBA

86/Graduates

\

SUSAN EBERSOLE

MARY EBERT

JAMES D. EGLOFF

PATn JEAN ECKERT

KATIiRYN EICHORN

SUSAN ELLSWORTIi

LUCILLE EMMI

Graduates/ 87

CHARlES lliOMAS ENOCHS

JODYG. FAIST

Pf.TIR EVAIDI

KHADIJEH FALASIRI

DEBORAH ADAIR FANNIN

MICHAEL FASSl

MARY ANN FAVATA

PETER WlllJAM FEE

GAIl MARIE FElTER

MARYFEUCETTl

88/ Graduates

ELIZABETH ACK

BARRYAEBERT

MARK ALE

DIANE ROSE AOCCO

lJ\URA AOROlTO

ROBERT FlJ\GLER

ELIZABETH Fl.J\NNERY

MAR1liA FLEET

SITVEN FUlSCHER

BRIDGETO.FLYNN

LORI S.FUCKSrnN

Graduates/ 89

DAVID M. FOLSOM

VIRGINIA FORSYTl-i

JOAN FORSYTl-iE

GARY FOSBRINK

ROBINJ.FOX

BARBARA LYNN FORDE

SHARON R. FRAILEY

DEBRA FRANCLEMONT

KAREN FRANSMAN

BREIT FREY

NANCYFROMER

9O/Graduates

LUCIA FRONCZAK

TOM FUSCO

RICHARD A GACZEWSKI

MARY ANNE GAGAT

LESUE A GA!J>.NT1

EUZABEni R GARVER

DEBBIE GAYNOR

MARY E.GEELAN

LORI A GEISMAR

JOANNE GENCO

JULIAGLANC

DAVID GUNA

Graduates/ 91

92/Faculty

Paul Homer

John Mack

AllanKom

Rex Lohmann

Faculty/ 93

JANICE MARIE GOlJ3A

EDWARD P. GOERSS

ROSAlJND B. GOLDMAN

FERN DEBRAGOLDBlJI1T

BEll-i ELLEN GOLDBERG

DEBRA J. GORDON

STEPHEN E. GOODMAN

KIM M. GOODIN

DIANE GOLOMBEK

FREDRIC GOLDSTEIN

DEBORAH ROSE GOUN

DEBORAH GORTON

JONATIiAN GRAHAM

GREGGGOUYD

94/Graduates

WILLIAM T.GRAHAM

" \ \

JAMES GRASBERGER

NANCY J. GRECO

UNDA GREENBAUM

PAUL GRIEBNER

CAROL A GROCKI

CATI-IARINE M. GUBALA

LuANN GUGINO

PATRICIA GUGINO

MARY GUMLAK

JUUE M. GURLO

MARION HAAS

DEBRA HACKETT

Graduales/ 95

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