Trinity Elder Law - July 2020

Fourth of July Traditions Peace of Mind Post T he Fourth of July is an amazing holiday in our country — we band together and celebrate our nation’s birthday. It’s a time to enjoy each other’s company and create unforgettable traditions. This time of CELEBRATING THE EVENT THAT CHANGED OUR COUNTRY JULY 2020

year reminds me of some of my family’s most cherished Fourth of July memories, and as a history buff, I can’t help thinking about what this day actually means for our nation. When I was little, my entire family would have a picnic out on my grandparent’s farm by the lake. The lake was just big enough for a couple of docks and their small cabin. Every year my cousins and I spent the day lighting fireworks, swimming, canoeing, fishing, or making s’mores in the firepit!

After law school, I started spending the Fourth of July with my grandmother. She wasn’t quite as active at that point, so we would always have fun watching “A Capitol Fourth” on PBS, a

special, live concert that features the National Symphony Orchestra and many other famous performers.

Around mid-afternoon, things got started for the adults who cooked hot dogs, hamburgers, and steaks. My grandmother would even break out her world-famous deviled eggs that everyone looked forward to. When I was around age 12, my passion for horses intensified, so I ended going to more horse shows over the summer. While the horse shows were fun and beautiful fireworks lit up the sky, those moments could never compare to the fun family times on the lake. The tradition continued, with a slightly different twist, after I graduated from law school. “The lake was just big enough for a couple of docks and their small cabin. Every year my cousins and I spent the day lighting fireworks, swimming, canoeing, fishing, or making s’mores in the firepit!”

Since I’m pretty active and health- conscious during the rest of the year, I like to make the Fourth of July my “festival of eating,” which means eating all the chips and desserts my heart desires! Family traditions aside, it’s impossible for me to ignore the historical aspect of the holiday. I’m so proud of our forefathers for separating themselves from Britain; their courage and passion for freedom united us as a country, and their vision is still alive today. And, according to PBS.org, both John Adams and Thomas Jefferson died on July4, 1826, while those in the rest of the nation were celebrating their independence. As two proud patriots and Founding Fathers, it seems only fitting that they would pass within hours of each other on such a momentous day. I hope you have a wonderful Fourth of July celebration with your friends, family, and fellow Americans and enjoy your own unique Independence Day traditions.

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