Dulwich College Donors' Report 2016

Donors' Report 2016

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Contents

2016 marks a major milestone in the history of Dulwich with the completion of The Laboratory, the College’s most significant project to be built on the campus since the Barry Buildings in the 1860s. We are deeply grateful to all our supporters and community in embarking on this great adventure which will transform the boys’ learning environment at the College for generations to come. Dr Joe Spence, The Master

Introduction

03 04 06 08

College Finances

Bursaries

Campus Works 2019 Society

11 Public benefit and the community 12 Enterprises 16 Roll of benefactors 17-27 Old Alleynians 17 Parents 21 Staff 21 Friends 22 Organisations 22 Trusts and Foundations 22 Pupil benefactors 23 The Canon Carver Society 25

2015-16 at a Glance Gifts Received in 2015-16 £1.8 million Donors 962 Total Received for The Laboratory to 31 July 2016 £4.5 million Total Donors to The Laboratory to 31 July 2016 1,404

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Introduction

Our Donors’ Report is an important opportunity to thank our benefactors – Old Alleynians and friends of the Dulwich College community – and to celebrate the many ways in which philanthropic support continues to play a key role in the life of the College. Within the report you will also find updates about the College’s strategic plans; our finances, our bursary programme and our extensive and important partnership activities, reflecting our heritage and charitable mission.

As we approach our 400th Anniversary in 2019, this is a particularly important time for the Dulwich College community. We have ambitious plans for the future including building on the foundation of the Bursary Appeal Fund and transforming our campus for future generations. It is our ambition to sponsor a ‘New Dulwich Experiment’ and offer financial assistance for up to 50% of our pupils, thereby ensuring easier and greater access to the College for boys whose families would not otherwise be able to afford a Dulwich education. It is also our ambition to create a campus which will foster and enhance the learning and development of boys both in and beyond the classroom. In order to do that we plan to invest over £19 million on capital improvements over the next three years.

Your support is essential in helping us to provide an extraordinary education to young men of all backgrounds. We prepare pupils to better face the world, and better the world they face.

We need and appreciate your help - year after year - to do it well.

Dr Joe Spence

The Master

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College Finances

The summarised information below is taken from the financial statements for the year ended 31 July 2016. All the College’s funds are committed to the pursuit of its charitable objectives.

A copy of the full audited accounts can be found published online at http://www.dulwich.org.uk/college/about/annual- report-and-accounts.

What is the breakdown of the College’s annual income?
 Fees; trading (e.g. lettings and International Schools) and investment income from the College’s endowment account for 90% of the annual income. The Dulwich Estate gave an income distribution of £2.4 million and £1.8 million came from fundraising during the year.

What is the breakdown of the College’s expenditure?
 Staff, operating, trading and finance costs along with depreciation account for 84% of the annual bill. £3.4 million was spent on bursaries and scholarships, leaving a surplus of £3.3 million which helped fund the capital expenditure of £8.3 million during the year including £5.5 million on The Laboratory, which was also funded by borrowing from the endowment.

Income 2015/16 - £43.3 million

Expenditure 2015/16 - £43.3 million

OTHEROPERATING COSTS £5.9m

TRADING £4.0m

STAFF COSTS £24.0m

FEES & EXTRAS £34.2m

55%

9%

79%

13%

BURSARIES/ SCHOLARSHIPS £3.4m

INVESTMENTS £900k

DULWICH ESTATE £2.4m

TRADING/FINANCE £3.4m

5%

8%

8%

2%

SURPLUS (for capital expenditure) £3.3m

FUNDRAISING £1.8m

DEPRECIATION £3.3m

5%

8%

8%

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How strong is the College’s Balance Sheet? The College does have a strong balance sheet. However, at 31 July 2016 £48 million of this represented capitalised building works on the campus and other assets that cannot be realised. There were realisable endowment assets of £24 million but these need to cover the net debt and pension deficit which totalled £16 million.

Distribution of funds raised During the financial

year 1 August 2015 to 31 July

2016, the College raised £1.8 million of philanthropic income, which was used for bursaries, The Laboratory, and ‘other’ - including specific projects, unrestricted income, prizes and awards.

BURSARY APPEAL

Realisable endowment investments

£24m

£57m

THE LABORATORY

Cash Loans (Debt) Other non-realisable net assets

51%

As of 31 July 2016

£7m

(£15m)

£49m

(£8m)

Pension deficit liability

Total net assets

Investments The majority of the College’s investments are held in the Dulwich College Investment Fund (DCIF), a fund managed by investment managers on behalf of the College. The investment managers during the year were BlackRock Investment Management (UK) Limited (BIML) and Veritas Investment Management (Veritas), BIML managing approximately 60% of the fund and Veritas 40%. In the last 12 months to 31 July 2016 the investments of DCIF under the management of BIML had a total return of 7.1% against a benchmark of 6.8%. The investments under the management of Veritas had a total return of 13.3% against a benchmark of 16.1%.

What is the bottom line? We need your support whether as a new donor, or as one of our already loyal supporters. Whilst financially strong, the College operates on relatively small margins. This position will continue over the period of the College’s Strategic Development Plan, including the Masterplan for the site. It is therefore very important that the fundraising continues to be successful if the College’s ambitions are to be achieved without taking funds away from other activities or provisions that the College would normally expect to fund from its annual income.

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“My time at Dulwich has been unforgettable. From the start I have always felt at home here; there is nothing nicer than walking around having friendly conversations with everyone I pass. Academically, the school has given me so much freedom and opportunity to explore all my interests, and outside the classroom, I have been allowed to grow and mature through thousands of hours doing music, scouting, and countless other wonderful activities.” Jonathan Wolstenholme, 2016 Prefect, describes what a Dulwich education means to a pupil today

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Bursaries

From the time of the Founder, Edward Alleyn, who established his College of God’s Gift to provide ‘good learning’ to ‘twelve poor scholars’, Dulwich College has enjoyed a long history of offering an outstanding education to bright boys regardless of their families’ financial means. Many Old Alleynians will remember – and have been beneficiaries of – the ‘Dulwich Experiment’, begun in the 1940s by the then Master of the College, Christopher Gilkes. Under this scheme the fees of boys who passed the entrance examinations were paid for by the boys’ local authorities. During the 1950s and 1960s as many as 85% of pupils at the College were recipients of such support. Local authority funding was replaced by the central government’s Assisted Places Scheme in 1980, which continued until 1997. Since 1997, the College has relied on philanthropic support and its own financial resources to fund bursary places. The Bursary Appeal Fund, consisting mainly of a ring-fenced endowment, was established in 1990 and has been built up through charitable donations over the years. The fund today stands at £10.4 million (including some non-endowment donations) and since its conception has contributed over £2.6 million of bursaries awarded at the College.

Bursaries Today Bursaries today are funded by the College’s Bursary Appeal Fund and from the income distributions of the Estate. In 2015-16, the College spent a total of £2.5 million on bursary support, with 165 boys receiving a bursary. All bursaries are means tested and reviewed annually, and range from 10% to 100% of fees. Over the coming years, the College is committed to expanding bursary provision at all levels and it is our ambition to offer financial assistance for up to 50% of our pupils in Year 7 and above whose parents are unable to meet the cost of the full fees, through the creation of a ‘New Dulwich Experiment’. Our short-term plan is to raise an annual income through regular giving and our Annual Fund programme. The long-term sustainable solution is to build up our Bursary Appeal Fund, the income from which will fund these places in perpetuity. “I entered Dulwich College at the age of nine as part of 'The Dulwich Experiment'. The style of teaching suited me and after winning a mathematics scholarship I went up to Trinity College, Cambridge and studied engineering. My career as an engineer was successful and I want to give other young people the opportunity to receive a good education so that they can fulfill their potential. As my grandfather used to say “The best gift you can give a child is a good education” Richard Garrett (1952-61)

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Campus works

Future major capital projects Planning approval has been received for The Orchard and Old Blew Link, on which work began early in 2017, with completion for the new academic year in September. This project will unify the two boarding units, via a single storey glass link, into one cohesive boarding house, with a Common Room to the rear of the Orchard providing a meeting place for all 55 boarders. 


In the year under review, as well as delivering £2.2 million (2014/15: £1.6 million) of specific minor buildings projects, the College invested just under £5.5 million on The Laboratory, a new state of the art facility for Science and a venue for the Arts. Phase one was completed in April 2015 and works then began on phase two, which was completed on time and to budget in June 2016. The new building has delivered an outstanding teaching and learning facility which has been widely admired and already used extensively by the community and other schools. Phase two further develops this opportunity with a 240 seat auditorium, ‘Informatics’ IT creative spaces and additional laboratories for the Junior and Lower Schools. The Governors committed to funding the full Laboratory project, at a total cost of £21.7 million, on the basis that it would be funded by borrowing £10.6 million from the College’s endowment, charitable donations of £5.9 million and funding the balance from annual surpluses and bank borrowing if necessary. As at 31 July 2016, the total cash spent on the project was £20.7 million, of which £4.5 million had been raised from charitable donations. A further £800,000 is pledged towards this project taking the total pledged income to £5.3 million. Another significant project completed in the year was the renovation and refurbishment of the Hockey artificial pitch, at a cost of £500,000, in use by both College pupils and, outside school hours, by community sports groups.

Work on the Barry Buildings has now begun to repair the terracotta facades at high level on the Centre Block and the contractors moved in as soon as Michaelmas Term 2016 ended. The entirety of the Centre Block will be shrouded in scaffolding and white monoflex for the whole of 2017, while expert stonemasons and craftsmen carry out the intricate work of

cutting out and replacing damaged and failing terracotta and cleaning and repairing the façade and windows. The works are essential and unavoidable as part of the College’s custodial responsibility for the preservation of this important architecture. Parallel to these external works, planning is in an advanced stage for the internal refurbishment of the Barry Buildings, which will restore and upgrade 50 classrooms, teaching staff offices and the corridors of North and South Blocks. This is a mammoth and complex task which will be delivered in phases, one floor at a time, decanting teaching departments into the green portacabins previously used by Science. Classrooms will

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be modernised with the introduction of current technology and IT, whilst restoring the grandeur of
their original design as teaching spaces. This is a very significant and expensive project principally because of the cost of installing new services throughout the buildings, involving new heating plant and pipework to replace old, decrepit and leaking systems, electrical re-wiring and
the installation of full IT networks. The project will begin in the Easter holidays of 2017, with completion within a year to 15 months. implementation in 2018. This will deliver a transformed central campus, restored to full pedestrian use, creating reflective spaces for the boys. The first phase was completed this year with the replacement of the 34 ageing trees of ‘Chestnuts Avenue’ by 52 new specimens in ‘Lime Tree Walk’, which also provided the opportunity to resurface the path with top-dressed gravel. It is intended to submit “The Landscape Plan” for planning permission in 2017, with a view to

Transforming the campus In 2011 the Master and Governors commissioned an architectural Masterplan from John McAslan+ Partners in order to have a clear strategic sense of our potential for delivering a coherent plan for the development of the campus, ensuring we meet the College’s needs today and in the future. This plan has informed current development of the site and has been further developed by a Supplement to the Masterplan delivered by Grimshaw Architects. These key plans identify the opportunities to create a campus which will foster and enhance the learning and development of boys, staff and the wider community both in and beyond the classroom. The total cost of the immediate priority projects in the Masterplan is currently estimated at £19.2 million which includes £10.7 million for the internal refurbishment of the Barry Buildings.

A feasibility study is in process to determine the best use and future of Chestnuts which is in a very poor state, and a new playground has been built at DUCKS to the delight of the children and staff on the hill, while a memorial garden near to The Laboratory is in design, thanks to the generosity of two former governors.

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2019 SOCIETY

The 2019 Society honours those who have made a gift of £2,019 or more to the College prior to the College’s 400th Anniversary in 2019.

“I found the invitation to join the 2019 Society difficult to resist. As both an OA and a parent of two OAs, I have benefited enormously from all the College has to offer. The 2019 Society is a good way to continue supporting future generations, as well as providing an opportunity to meet up with friends and fellow donors at annual events.” Peter King (1971-76; past parent), 2019 Society member

Donations of £2,019 can bemade in one payment or via instalments. For those aged 18-27 membership is £201.90 and £20.19 for current pupils. For more information or to donate please visit the website www.oa.dulwich.org.uk/2019society or call the development office on 020 8299 5335.

Public benefit and the community

The Governors are cognisant of their responsibilities in providing public benefit. The College has and continues to demonstrate a significant number of areas of public benefit within its core charitable objective of conducting at Dulwich, a day and boarding school for boys in which there is provided a practical, liberal and religious education.

charitable mission is embodied in the College’s commitment to genuine educational partnership with the maintained sector and a strong ethos of responsibility towards wider society amongst students, staff and Governors. There is a particular focus on staff empowering students to take ownership of its community activities, thereby developing leadership and inculcating a genuine and lifelong understanding that privilege entails responsibility towards others. Shaping a legacy of sustained community engagement is thus an annual focus of the student Senior Prefect body. The College is also highly receptive to working with external agencies in support of raising aspiration across both sectors and has thus developed warm partnerships with: the National Citizen Service, the Spring Board Bursary Foundation, the Ogden Trust, the Advocacy Academy and the Stuart Horne Bursary Scheme.

The identifiable benefits include the provision of means- tested bursaries, which totalled £2.5 million in the year, the provision of subsidised access to College facilities for community and educational purposes to the value of £99,000, pupil fundraising for external charities to the value of £35,000, approximately 110 members of staff contributing to various forms of outreach activity benefiting the wider community during term time and holidays (with over 60 doing so in activities of at least three hours every week during term time) and a number of relevant community activities. The College has a strategy of ongoing engagement with the community, reflecting its heritage and philanthropic tradition. This instinctive reference to its Founder’s

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Dulwich continues to act as an educational partner to City Heights E-ACT Academy, which opened in September 2013. The aim is to provide support for the Academy’s educational work but also to establish links and activities which benefit both schools through shared experience and good practice. The relationship between the Academy and the College is a strong one and has developed significantly over the last year, ahead of the Academy moving to KS4 in September 2016, with a particular focus on timetabled Liberal Studies afternoons to run enrichment classes. The College offers considerable financial, administrative and practical support to the Southwark Community Education Council (SCEC), a charitable trust which, in the College’s case, provides a Saturday School experience for some 80 students in Year 6 from eleven participating state primaries in the borough of Southwark, assisting them in making a confident transition to secondary school through Mathematical Problem-Solving, Science, English, Drama and Technology and Media workshops.

The College continues to play a significant part in the work of Southwark Schools Learning Partnership (SSLP), a scheme involving ten schools – seven from the maintained sector and the three Dulwich Foundation Schools – which runs a series of projects for students and joint CPD for staff. Over the last
year the College has hosted events such as the second Liberty Schools’ Conference for sixth formers; Drama workshops on ‘How to Write about Theatre?’ led by theatre critic Mark Fisher; and the five-month project Variations on a Theme, during which the artist and sculptor Peter Randall Page RA worked with sixth-form students from the College and the Charter School. The College has also collaborated with Dulwich Picture Gallery and Mystart/ Film Aid International on an exhibition of works produced by young refugees in North West Kenya, which inaugurated a series of workshops for SSLP students. Boys’ involvement in Community Service has a considerable profile in the College and is recognised in the award of community service ties at the end of

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each term and in the award of College Colours as a requirement of the Dulwich Diploma awarded to boys in Year 13. It is overseen by a Senior Prefect working in conjunction with a Community Service Coordinator. The latter member of staff attends meetings of the Independent Schools’ Community Action Working Party. 145 students participate in 12 different projects, eight of which are external, including at the Hollington Youth Club in Camberwell which the College has supported since 1923. Approximately 20 staff are involved in supporting student involvement. In addition, 18 Year 11 students completed the NCS’s summer Challenge programme, which included working with Aspire Wellbeing in West Dulwich, a not-for-profit day care centre for adults with physical and sensory disabilities. A number of academic departments are involved in subject-specific partnership work, and a particular feature of the Science Department has been the relationship with Bonus

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Pastor Catholic College in Lewisham, which does not have Sixth Form. The Department has provided teaching to Gifted and Talented students in Years 9, 10 and 11 and has worked with the Ogden Trust Scholarship Scheme to encourage boys to study Physics at the College in the Sixth Form.

The Drama Department has collaborated with Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre on two major exhibitions, ‘Theatrical Treasures from Dulwich College’ and ‘The St. Omer first Folio’, with the intention of enabling the College’s theatrical archive to be seen by as wide an audience as possible during Shakespeare 400. As the James Caird now forms part of the KS2 curriculum for Southwark primary schools, staff from the Archives have also hosted twenty tours for visiting primary school classes over the last twelve months. The College also participated in and hosted this year’s Visual to Vocal production, a collaboration between musicians from English Touring Opera, Dulwich Picture Gallery, elderly members of the local community and boys from the College. And, of course, it continues to provide facilities and staffing for the 25th Camberwell Scouts and Dulwich Explorers, an ‘open’ Scout group: 10% of Cubs and Scouts are pupils who are not Alleynians and at Explorer age this increases to 50%.

College staff have also continued to deliver practical Physics and Chemistry in support of start-up A levels at St. Thomas the Apostle College, Peckham. In Sport, the College continues
to administer, host and provide staffing for a variety of annual sporting events and activities involving the maintained sector, including an indoor Rowing taster session for local Year 4 students and Southwark Schools Athletics Days, involving 700 local students, and a PSV Eindhoven coaching day for 22 schools in Southwark and Lambeth.

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Enterprises

The commercial activities of the College are operated through its wholly owned trading subsidiaries, Dulwich College Enterprises (DCE) and Dulwich College Enterprises Overseas (DCEO). DCE manages the College’s UK commercial activities. DCEO manages the College’s overseas commercial interests.

school in Myanmar which opened its junior campus as Dulwich College Yangon in August 2016 (a senior school campus is due to open in August 2017). Work was also begun for the establishment of a second campus in Shanghai (Minhang), which opened in Summer 2016. The overseas business generates an income from royalty fees based on a proportional share of the international schools’ total fee income, and a fixed annual fee for each school. The arrangements are governed by a World Charter signed in August 2014. Through DCEO and DCMI we are creating the best of British education overseas, enhancing the Dulwich brand worldwide and securing a substantial and reliable annual income to support Alleynians now and in the future.

There are a number of separate departments within DCE: Events (which lets out College facilities), the Commissariat (the school shop), the Sports Club, the Outdoor Centre and the Foundation Coach Service. The overseas business of DCEO involves the licensing of the College’s name and intellectual property to DCMI, which runs international schools in China (Shanghai, Beijing and Suzhou), South Korea (Seoul) and Singapore. Besides these schools, DCMI also operates two Dulwich High Schools in China for Chinese students. The two Dulwich High Schools work in partnership with established Chinese schools: Suzhou High School and Yung Wing School in Zhuhai. During the year the College also collaborated with DCMI on the establishment of a

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Roll of benefactors

Old Alleynians

Every year the College produces a Roll of Benefactors, to thank all those who have given financial support to the College. The £1.8 million raised for our charitable purposes in 2015-16 reflects the generosity of many of you, our valued benefactors. An impressive 962 donors contributed to projects such as The Laboratory and bursaries with participation from Old Alleynians, Trust and Foundations sources, and the Dulwich Community including staff, current pupils and parents. The list includes gifts received between 1st August 2015 to 31 July 2016, representing the College’s financial year. Every effort has been made to ensure that the Roll of Benefactors is complete and accurate. If your name has mistakenly been missed off then please accept our apologies and do inform us. We will be happy to publish corrections in the next roll. We would also like to take this opportunity to thank all those who have supported the College in other ways; notably through time, expertise, and good will. Specifically we would like to acknowledge the Governors, members of the Development Committee, the Alleyn Club Committee, and Friends of Dulwich College.

Richard Bolton Ronald Branscombe Richard Burgess Michael Calder Roy Carter David Chaffin Rodney Chambers Bryan Cox Roger Croucher Anthony Daltry Robert Davidson Colin Deverill Peter Dorey His Hon Timothy Nash John Faulkner Christopher Field Dirk FitzHugh Michael Garrett MBE

1940-49 Derek Akers

Geoffrey Dove Peter Edgley Robert Esden Marshall Field CBE Martin Godfrey Peter Grose

Brian Harding Dr John Lewis Donald Mawbey Peter Munson Alan Pollard Ian Thompson

Prof Sir Bryan Thwaites Sqn Ldr James Witherow

Terence George Donald Goodsell

1950-59 Michael Bushby Lt Col Terence Adams Jerrold Alexander Prof Ewan Anderson Prof Yeshwant Bakhle Christopher Barrett William Barry Christopher Batten Bernard Battley John Bell

Christopher Gordon Gp Capt Paul Gray Prof David Greer

David Griffiths Mervyn Harper Roger Hedge Ronald Hickson Philip Holliday Brian Howes Stuart Hulse David Jowett Geoffrey Keeble

To everyone who has given, pledged, or is planning a bequest to the College, we thank you very much indeed.

Ronald Blythe Denis Bodiam

2019 Society Member

Deceased

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1960-69 Roger Alexander Richard Alford Roy Amlot QC Nigel Archer Roger Bacon Jeremy Baker Richard Barwick Philip Beaven Patrick Bentley

Lt Cdr Bruce Lemonde William Leon Antony Linaker Derek Long Colin Mander Val McCarthy CBE Brig Bruce McDermott CBE Dr Hector McLean CBE Colin Mealor David Mitchell John Morris David Price Ian Rankine George Ray His Hon Michael Rich QC Bruce Shilstone Robert Smith CMG Humphrey Nye Edward Pearce Richard Thorn Michael Thorpe Dr C John Toynton Dr Dan Tunstall Pedoe David Walker Brig Johnny Walker OBE DL Derek Ward Peter Webster Andrew Wilson Prof Michael Winterbottom Derek Woolston John Yelland Anonymous (x3) Colin Spears David Stewart Michael Stone Nicholas Tatman

Derek Goodchild Peter Gower His Hon Judge Andrew Goymer

Laurence Green Dr Denis Gross

David Heycock David Holliday Geoffrey Holloway Brian Hopper Christopher Ignatowicz Martin Jackson Dr Robert Johnson James Kendall Michael Kennard Prof Brian Kennett The Revd Canon Nicholas Kerr Martin Langford Ian Lister Peter Lyon The Revd Brian McHenry CBE Robert Newton Gp Capt Derek North DL David Paul John Pearse Dr Jefferson Pearse Jeremy Pearson Prof Roland Petchey Jan Pringle Patrick Rawson Edward Richart Philip Rickard The Rt Hon Sir Colin Rimer MA LLB The Rt Hon Peter Riddell CBE Robert Scott Lt Col David Setchell Michael Simons

John Bouldin Bryan Bowers Christopher Bradshaw

Dr Martyn Brown Frank Browning

Douglas Butterfield Robert Butterfield The Very Revd Dr A Carr KCVO Prof Aldwyn Cooper Col Robert Crawley OBE Dr Richard Crocombe

Mike Davies Peter Davies Jeremy Davies Christopher Dean Alistair Defriez Geoffrey Driscoll Simon Dyson Jeremy Eccles Christopher Edwards Brian Elliot Christopher Elston John Fordham Angus Freathy Col Keith Galbraith Richard Garrett

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John Smallwood Ian Smith Dr Richard Soper Martin Stone Tom Sutton Peter Thompson Prof Andrew Tomkins OBE Dr Graham Townsend The Venerable Robin Turner CB DL Robert Upton CBE Anthony Wallace John Walters Ivor Warburton Patrick White

Robert Condon Nicholas Cremin Guy Davis Giuseppe De Benedictis Martin Dunkerton Tony Edgley Charles Fellows-Smith Russell Heath Robert Holland Andy Huggett David Ince Bruce Jones William Jutsum Peter King Jonathan Lee The Revd Tony Leighton Mark Leonard Malcolm Levinkind James Gowans Steven Hastings

Kevin Ryall Prof Seif Shaheen Prof Bruce Sizer

Michael Smith Timothy Smith David Stocker

Robert Stockwell James Stronach Christopher Tarrant The Revd Canon Stuart Thomas James Thornton Stuart Tutt Dr Martin Vallis Michael Wade Nicholas Waller Graham Ward CBE Dr Rick Weber Robert West Peter Wibberley Dr Tony Wierzbicki Vincent Williams

Nicholas White John Williams Brian Willis Charles Wood Prof John Wyke Anonymous (x1) 1970-79 Michael Abrahams Andrew Allen Anthony Anderson David Aston Simon Bailey Stephen Barber David Barke Timothy Birse Stephen Bondfield

Trevor Llewelyn Stephen Locke Keith Macquarie Richard Mattick Colin McCaul Neil McGhee Peter Miles Michael Mustoe Keith Penfold Andrew Reid John Renel Michael Rice Anthony Roberts Nicholas Robinson John Rose Nick Rundle

Andrew Winter Timothy Yates

1980-89 Dr Mark Bentley Dr David Brightman Rodney Britto Douglas Burnham Alastair Capon David Clacher John Corcoran James Cunningham Robin Davies

Derek Bryan David Camp

Andrew Chadney Robin Chapman William Chappell

Gerald Dowler George Farha

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Charles Foster Dr Dominic Gooding Andrew Guy Nicholas Hallwood Russell Harper Timothy Havenhand Louis Kenna Anthony King Dr Gregory Lawton

James Wadsworth Nick Wenban-Smith David Wise Anonymous (x2)

Mohammad Talukder Adam Turnbull Benet Turnbull

Deep Valecha James Young Anonymous (x1)

1990-99 Ayodeji Agun Andrew Baker Gavyn Berry

2000-09 Fahad Abdulla Patrick Atkinson Kunle Babawale Charles Bagley James Baker John Cassidy Kishan Chandarana Timothy Duncan Alastair Fulton Simon Inzani Parthiv Kurup Dr Alexander Langley Jamie Lawlor Tom Lawrence Jonathan Mead Dr Leon Rocha Dr Onn Thein Michael Thurgood Rajvinder Virdee Arthur Virgo Nianyi Xu Anonymous (x1)

Nicholas Lay Charles Lee Roy Lee Guy Lester

Kenneth Beuden William Burghes Duncan Byrne Timothy Eclair-Heath Dr Ben Field James Franklin Nicholas Hamilton Andrew Hill Richard Horner Owen Jenkins Jo Jenner Zaki Kanaan Kamran Khalid Nicholas Lawson Syd Martin Lt Cdr Thomas McPhail Dr Ashraful Mirza Ram Moorthy Benjamin Nicol Alexander Parvin Hugh Price Sumit Rai Michael Sakkas Richard Sharman Mark Shaw Simon Smith Dr Christian Smith

Darius Lewington Dr Nicholas Martin Samuel Morland

Dr Rahul Nath Alexander Offer Peter Petyt Darius Poli Andrew Ralph

Dr Nicholas Rollitt Lt Col Philip Rosell Dr Christopher Roseveare Raoul Roy Dr Vish Saxena Chris Scott Martin Self Dr Puvan Selvanathan

Daniel Sheratte Matthew Smith Stephen Smith Richard Starr Andrew Tatman Ian Tredgett Peter Vicary-Smith

2010-16 Charles Apthorp Thomas Blowes Michal Dabrowka Tom Deasy

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The Gleave Family Jon Grussing David and Sarah Hanrahan Dr Venetia Herzmark Tony Higlett Jayne Hill Peter Hogarth Worth and Janet Houghton The Ivin Family The Jacob Family Naushad and Naseem Jivraj David Kavanagh and Harriet Mellor Alexander and Sally Keith Mr and Mrs J Kennedy Hwan Kyoon Kim Geoff and Gabrielle Koffman Christian and Stefania Rinaldi Kutscher Dale Lattanzio and Bevan Watt Mark Loveday The Marchant Family Matthew and Amanda McEvoy Daniel and Sarah McKimm Marc Meyohas and Fiona Bembridge Ian and Karen Milne Virginia Milnes Robert Montague Olga Moser Eva Muldoon-De Groot Sarah Murphy The Neal Family Sanjay and Anjula Newatia Ian and Sally Notley Ellen Opman

David Robinson James Robinson Ray Sacks and Wendy Jones Tommy Sanmoogan John Sheldon Nataliya Shilova Adeniya Sofolarin and Ailie Macadam The Storey Family The Strigo Family Saleem and Florence Taj Dr Lorna Tidmarsh Lord Andrew Turnbull KCB CVO and Lady Diane Turnbull George Ubah and Cesarina Mezzanotte-Ubah The Wakely Family Mr G G Watson Prof Olaf Wendler and Dr Renate Wendler Andrew White Simon White and Dr Frances Woisin Simon and Annabel Williams Andrew Wills Duncan and Claire Wilson Andrew and Claire Wright Frankie Yick Anonymous (x5) Staff, former staff and partners

Robert Double Carl Heimann Robbie Muir Zhipeng Shen Parents and past parents The Abbott Family Paquale Amodio and Randa Hanna-Amodio Reshma Ashraf Mason Ian and Debbie Baggs Jonathan and Carol Baldachin The Bayley Family Nicholas and Elizabeth Bliss Tim and Kathleen Bradley Amanda Brilliant The Ceccolini Family Gregg and Paula Cowie Ian and Teresa Dawkins Rosemary Dawson Paul and Jane De Rome Clement and Olufunke Deniran Dr Michael Fenlon and Prof Yvonne Doyle Marc and Alessandra Dwek Christopher Fanner and Siobhan Brzezina George Farha and Suha Hourani Campbell and Lisa Fleming Vicky Flind David and Jixin Flowers Pavel Fuks and Tatiana Kudina Olivia Gavin Bunt and Dr Susan Ghosh

Fiona Angel Michael Ashcroft John Charnley Basil Cridland A Evans

The Parfitt Family Mr and Mrs Podger Christine Robinson

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The Revd Neil Fairlamb Dr Toby Griffiths John Heath John and Laurie Hindley Dr John Jennings Katy Jones Alasdair and Ruth Kennedy Damian King Guy Lawrenson Nigel Prout David Rose Chris Rowe Iain Scarisbrick Jane Scott Dr Joseph and Angela Spence Dr Gardner Thompson Rick Wilson Sarah Wood Simon and Penelope Yiend William Young Friends Hubert Ashton Martin Ball Richard Bampfylde D Barker Bernard and Margaret Battley David Bawtree Rachel Booth John and Elizabeth Bouldin Anne Buchanan Hugh Carson Terry Walsh Tercia West Mark Whittaker

Alan Duncan John Emms Friends of Dulwich College Suzanne George John Gibbs Geoff Goodall Robert Hadfield Dr E B D Hamilton Lomond Handley Simon Hansell Keith The Earl of Malmesbury Philip Hedges Piotr Holysz

Anonymous (x5)

Organisations Career Milestones Ltd Carstairs Golf Society City of London - Queenhithe Ward Goldman Sachs International Hodder & Stoughton Killik & Co Morgan Stanley

Old Alleynian Football Club Political Economic Review Reach Holdings Richemont Streathers Clapham LLP Anonymous (x1)

Daniel Jarrett Francis Jevons David Kemp J Kenley J Kitching Simon Lambert James Leahy Jennifer Ledger The Looker Family Jane Macquitty

Trusts and Foundations

ACE Charitable Foundation Alleyn Club Arkwright Scholarships Trust OA Lodge The Karia Foundation The Linbury Trust The Lovering Charitable Foundation The Ogden Trust The Peter de Somogyi Memorial Trust The Timothy Franey Charitable Foundation The Worshipful Company of International Bankers The Worshipful Company of Painters & Stainers

Sir Peter Marshall Madeleine Melling Major General A Ritchie CBE Susan Rowe

Omar Shaheen Jonathan Silver Ann Thornton Beryl Tidy Timothy Toyne Sewen

Paul Vaculik David Walsh Thomas Yarwood L Zund

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The Worshipful Company of Pewterers Pupil benefactors Saba Abdo Tommi Adegbehingbe

Florence Black Thomas Blackman Max Bliss Bjorn Bloomquist Oliver Boardman Wolfgang Boettcher Alexander Bowes Jonny Brearley Edward Brilliant Magnus Broadley Will Brooke Oliver Brown Sebastian Brown

Nico Constantinou Edward Cook Nick Corbett

Alex Eskandari Lewis Evans Eddie Farara Joseph Farara Billy Farha Joe Fetherston Samuel Fishlock Benedict Fitzpatrick Sam Fleming Zach Fleming Wesley Fong Sunrise Foster Jack Fox Downes

Joshua Corbett James Cosway Gussie Coulter Sathya Cowie Fraser Cox Thomas Crawley-Boevey Charlie Croft Jardel Cumberbatch Edward Curran Alfie Curry Sebastian Curtis Zac D'Ancona Daniel Davies Sebastian Davy Richard De Rome Emmanuel Del Prete Hakan Digby Andrey Dobrov Edward Doepel Dominic Doepel Konstantinos Doran Thomas Drayton Joshua du Parc Braham Henri Dubois Isaac Dudzicki James Duffy Thompson Benjamin Duggan

Shehzore Adil Ryaan Ahmad Munir Ahmed Emilio Ali Daniel Almeyda Thomas Almeyda Ekow Amoah Fergal Antonioli Timothy Apthorp Johnnie Baggs Batis Baghaie Maxi Bailey Karl Bainge Sam Baker Benjamin Bamert James Barnett Teigue Barrow Aditya Batla Tommaso Batori Freddie Beacon Monty Beames Aaron Befekadu Tom Benavides Clark Max Bertin Christian Bertrand Tyler Biggs Jamie Billington Sonny Birrane Will Bishop

Edward Brydon Harvey Buchan Paddy Burke Conor Burke Ben Campbell Louie Carrigan Alexi Carver

Noah Franklin Angus Fraser Nicholas Fung Aiken Furlong Angus Gao

Dom Glassbrook Cameron Gleave Henry Gooderham

Harry Caulfield Bruno Ceccolini Oliver Chang Fergus Chawner Egor Chernyshova Nassir Choudry Herbie Christophers Harry Clark George Clarke Danny Clinton Tom E Coates Alejandro Cogolludo- Blank Jeremie Cohen Maximillian Constantinou

Joshua Gooding Rowan Gooding Harry Goodwin Louis Goodwin Angus Gould Philip Grammatikopoulos Frederick Greenwood Charlie Griffith Aidan Guppy

Dan Durkin Carlo Dwek Freddie Eccles Ted Eden Ralph Ellison Nicholas Elton

Luke Gurnhill Theo Gurnhill Jesse Gyane William Haddock Sham Hadgu Harry Hamilton

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Edward Hargrave Benjamin Harper Sam Harris Innes Harvey Kasper Heaton Alex Hemple Cameron Henderson Oisin Hetherington Joe Higgins James Higgins

Lucas Keith Tom Kelly Ben Kemp

Thomas Lui Torin Lynch James Lyon Penn Mackintosh Alasdair Mackintosh Theo Macklin Benjamin Maclennan Alexander Macnab Eshan Macpherson Milan Makrak-Singh Nicky Makrak-Singh Uzair Malida Constantine Malinovski Marcus Marchant Max Marchini Casper Massey Dexter McChesney Niall McKeown Rahul Madan Sahil Madan Josh Maguire

Leo Milne Samuel Milne Georgy Mina Nicolas Mo Yung Charlie Monksfield Billy Morris Sam Morrissey Savva Moser Matt Muldoon Finlay Munyard Jim Murdoch James Mwendwa Dev Nahar Hamzah Nasser Clinton Ng Louis Ng Alexander Notley Elliot Notley Felix Notley Haydn Oakley Josh Oakley Joseph O'Connor

Raoul Kemp Luca Kemp Matthew Kempton Jamie Kennedy Cameron Kerr

Sam Ketteley Sameer Khalil

Henry Hilton Tess Hindley Seymour Hine Alex Hitchen

Saajid Khan Amjad Khan Fynn Kiewell Oliver Killeen Alexander Kinch Jack Kinsman Alan Klejn Wei Keong Kon Christoffel Konijnenberg Darrius Kudiabor-Thompson Avi Kumar Nathan Kutner Ramsey Lababidi Diego Lacheze-Beer

Jack Hoffmann Samuele Hogan Joseph Hooper Christian Hopper Ben Hopper Tom Howlett Edward Humphries Joseph Hunt Zakariya Hussain

Alex McLean Oliver McNeil Calum McNeill Shreesh Mehrotra

Henry Ognev Edward Olsen James Olsen Louis O'Malley Thomas O'Neill Freddie Oxley Lorenzo Pacciana Andrestinos Papadopoulos Kit Parsons Roshan Patel

Tohid Ismail Gregory Ivin Ali Jivraj

Dexter Lachmann James Lattanzio Henry Laughton Matthew Law Chris Law Derek Law James Lee Harry Leslie Frederick Leslie Ellson Lin Stephen Liu Henry Loynes

Kamren Mehta Luke Meyohas Arjaan Miah Zachary Michaelides Zeb Micic Joshua Migliardi-Jones Ben Miller Lucas Miller

William Johnson Callum Johnston Lekh Joshi Max Joynson Zaki Kabir Max Kapsalis Krautwald

Orfeas Karavas Charlie Kearney Patrick Kearney Ossian Keith

Sunay Patel Ethan Patel Christopher Paton Dylan Pelz

Benedict Milliken Christopher Millis Jonathan Millis

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Finbar Percy Henry Perez-Hernandez Ben Philpott Solomon Pilbrow Ewan Plowden-Wardlaw Alexander Poli Bertie Poullis Rory Probert Tommaso Quaglia Omar Ramzan Alexander Rassmuson George Rawkins Matthew Riedy Aman Ritzmann Charles Robb Fraser Roberts Tyler Roberts-Hewitt Zack Rose Patel Dmitry Rusanov Alex Rush Alessandro Russo Dara Sabeti Oliver Sachs Luke Sanmoogan Rhys Saunders Jake Scarisbrick Felix Schneideman Dylan Schofield Jackson Schreyer Ben Schut Selvin Selbaraju Edward Read Skye Richarz Seth Ridgeon

Jack Shabi Jun Xiao Shen Adam Sheriff Joshua Shuster Owen Sibert

Felix Synge Teymour Taj

Tommy Walmesley Oliver Warner

Edoardo Taricco Thomas Taylor James Taylor

Jay Welland Ben Welland

Laurence White Thomas White Wilfrid Whiteley Kennedy Wilks Joe Williams

Alexander Simcox Mitchell Simmonds Josh Simpson Jai Singh Chaturvedi Richard Skelton Monty Slater Kiran Slatter Eddie Smith Samuel Smith Alex Somes Pinero Kiran Soulsby Billy Spackman Arthur Spencer Gianluca Spetale Harry Spicer Oliver Spillett Oscar Squirrell Josh Stanley Rory Stein Matthew Stern Sam Stewart Jonathan Stone Oliver Storey James Storey Adam Storey Jacob Stott Alexander Strigo Ezra Stuart Yuki Suter Oliver Suthersanen- Tutt

Ollie Taylor John Taylor Dylan Taylor Phillips Emre Tezcan Joshua Theaker Max Thorpe

James Williams Edward Wilson Reuben Wilson Lyosha Wiseman-Clarke Conor Wisentaner

Oliver Thwaites Lorcan Tierney Ed Tillson Guy Tillson Logan Tong Amelia Tong Oliver Totten Stanley Traynor Jacob Tree

Justin Wong Oscar Wood

Archie Wright Jefferson Xue Juejun Xue George Youakim Michael Yu Matthew Zeffertt Jimin Zhang Zhengyuan Zhu

Angus Treherne Pollock Francis Treherne Pollock Andrew Tse

Michael Ubah Euan Vaughan Juan Vila Rodriguez Jay Viray Nikolas Vrahimis Valentino Vrahimis Tom Wade William Wakefield

The Canon Carver Society

Graham Able Derek Akers 1937 - 1944 Warwick Armstrong 1958 - 1965 Christopher Austen 1952 - 1958

Zed Wakefield William Wakely Angus Walker Harry Wallace

Joe Seligman Hector Senior

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The Revd Betty Mockford William Morgan 1954 - 1963 Jack Morrison 1948 - 1955 Dr Peter Mudge 1947 - 1955 Peter Munson 1945 - 1949 Dr Colin Niven OBE Palmes Académiques 1952 - 1960 Bruce Noble MBE 1951 - 1958 John Norton 1947 - 1956 Richard Norton 1951 - 1959 Robert Parker 1950 - 1957 Richard Pearse 1958 -1966 Keith Penfold 1963 - 1971 Barry Phelps David Shapland 1954 - 1961 Bruce Shilstone 1944 - 1950 Dr Michael Shirley 1948 - 1955 Robert Smith CMG 1945-53 Anne Sowton Anthony Spain 1940 - 1944 Merrill Spencer Veronica Spink Michael Stone 1946 - 1954 Mary Stoneley Ralph Sutton 1954 - 1964 Nicholas Tatman 1952 - 1958 Barry Taylor 1961 - 1969 Maureen Teitelbaum Brian Thomas 1949 - 1957 Neil Thompson 1954 - 1962 Ann Thornton Prof Sir Bryan Thwaites 1936 - 1940 His Hon Michael Rich QC 1945 - 1954 The Rt Hon Sir Colin Rimer MA LLB 1954 - 1962 Nick Rundle 1969 - 1976

Richard Austin 1964 - 1971 Jeremy Baker 1953 - 1960 Bernard Battley 1948 - 1956 Marion Baxter Sir Peter Bazalgette 1962 - 1971 Vivian Bazalgette 1961 - 1969 Philip Beaven 1957 - 1964 The Revd Colin Beevers 1951 - 1959 Robert Bembridge 1945 - 1953 David Bethell 1975 - 1983 Timothy Birse 1966 - 1973 Ronald Blythe 1947 - 1954 Richard Bolton 1945 - 1953 Dr Michael Boyes 1942 - 1946 Patrick T R Brown 1945 - 1953 David Burden 1952 - 1959 John Bushby 1944 - 1948 Michael Bushby 1944 - 1950 The Very Revd Dr Arthur Carr KCVO 1952 - 1960 The Revd Ronald Casebow 1943 - 1950 Roger Chadder 1948 - 1956 Keith Chaundy 1948 - 1955 Dr Geoffrey Cook 1945 - 1955 Nick Cosh 1957 - 1965 Commander Graham J T Creedy LVO 1948 - 1956 Robert Deakin 1942 - 1945 Peter Dorey 1944 - 1951 Sir Peter Duffell KCB CBE MC 1949 - 1956 Dr David Dunlop 1954 - 1962 Nigel Dunsmore-Rouse 1947 - 1949 Christopher Edwards 1952 - 1961 Susan Ellicott

Brian Ellis MBE 1947 - 1955 Alan Evans 1944 - 1948 Alex Evans 1954 - 1957 David Ewings 1992 - 2002 Christopher Field 1951 - 1959 Alan Finlay 1942 - 1951 Peter Franklin 1946 - 1950 Godfrey Garrett OBE 1948 - 1956 Anthony Gibbs 1947 - 1954 Janet Gotch Commander Bob Grainger 1964 - 1973 Christopher Gravatt 1945 - 1950 Alan Gregory CBE 1937 - 1944 James Hammer CB 1942 - 1947 Ronald Hickson 1948 - 1956 Norman Hocknell 1945 - 1950 Michael Holmes 1950 - 1959 Peter Humphrey 1953 - 1960 Pauline Jones Dr Niloy Karia 1979 - 1986 Raymond Keene OBE 1959 - 1966 Roger Knight OBE 1957 -1966 Vaughan Lilley 1953 - 1961 Commander David Lingard 1952 - 1960 Jacqui MacDonald-Davis Ralph Mainard Nigel Massey 1952 - 1960 Dale McDonald Sumner 1945 - 1951 Dr Hector McLean CBE 1945 - 1953 Anne Hanson 1944 - 1949 John Harper 1942 - 1948 Russell Harper 1976 - 1983 Timothy Havenhand 1974 - 1983 Ian Hay Davison CBE 1945 - 1949

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Lord Andrew Turnbull KCB CVO The Venerable Robin Turner CB DL 1952 - 1961 Wilfred Tyson 1948 - 1951 Michael Wade 1967 - 1972 David Walker 1945 - 1950 Brig Johnny Walker OBE DL 1951 - 1959

Dr Martin Walker 1971 - 1978 Terry Walsh John Walters 1954 - 1962 Robert Weaver David Webster OBE 1941 - 1948 Robert West 1959 - 1966 Roger Westbrook CMG 1952 - 1959

Clive Whitbourn 1957 - 1964 Jane White Anthony Williams 1954 - 1962 The Revd Berresford D R Wood 1945 - 1951 Anonymous (x2)

“I urge everyone to think of leaving a gift to the College in their will to furnish those in the future with the tremendous benefits we enjoyed in the past.” John Lovering (1961-68), Governor Dulwich College (December 2010-present)

A legacy to Dulwich College is your opportunity to support the education of future generations of Alleynians, helping the College to provide first class resources for teaching and learning, and to make a Dulwich College education available to as many bright and able boys from all backgrounds, as possible.

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DULWICH COLLEGE Dulwich Common, London, SE21 7LD Telephone: +44 (0)20 8299 5335 Email: development@dulwich.org.uk Web: www.dulwich.org.uk Registered Charity No 1150064

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