Southwest Austin Edition - March 2020

SOUTHWEST AUSTIN DRIPPING SPRINGS EDITION

VOLUME 12, ISSUE 12  MARCH 25APRIL 28, 2020

ONLINE AT

For the rst time in more than a genera- tion, March 2020 came and went without South by Southwest Conference & Festivals, Austin’s tech and cultural event that draws attendees from across the world. The 10-day stretch of SXSW is more than a festival—it has proven to be an essential nancial asset to the community, now lost in response to the novel coronavirus disease, COVID-19. Initially, several local businesses and laborers said the nancial hardship of losing SXSWwas a weight too heavy to bear. The virus has since escalated into a national emergency and diminished swaths of the service economy in Austin. Like many U.S. cities, Austin’s government has restricted gatherings of more than 10 people, closed dine-in services at all bars and restau- rants, and urged people to work from home. U.S. President Donald Trump said such measures could last until mid-summer. COVID19fallout forces businesses intoght for futures BY JACK FLAGLER AND CHRISTOPHER NEELY THE SPRING SEASON PROVIDES 30% TO 40% OF OUR ANNUAL INCOME. ND OURCOME CONTINUED ON 36

PAST FUTURE

ST. ELMO PUBLICMARKET: An old bus factory is being renovated into the St. Elmo Public Market, which at build-out will include about 25 local vendors, apartments and oce space.

NICHOLAS CICALECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COMING SOON

SPOTLIGHT ST. ELMO After years of planning and construction, three mixed-use projects—The Yard, The Ten-O-Five and Public Lofts—have brought new retail and condos to the St. Elmo district, located east of South Congress Avenue along St. Elmo Road. A fourth project, the St. Elmo Public Market, is eyeing the nish line and could open by the end of 2020. As a revitalized district takes shape, more developers have jumped in to build out what was once the industrial core of South Austin.

TOTAL MULTIFAMILY UNITS: 1 , 2 4 2

7 0 , 2 5 0 RETAIL:

square feet

OFFICE:

1 0 3 , 8 3 0

square feet

HOTEL ROOMS:

INSIDE

36

2 8 6

SOURCE: ST. ELMO PUBLIC MARKETCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

INSIDE

32

CONTINUED ON 34 Texas lost an estimated $3.59 billion in federal fund- ing after a 2010 census undercount, pushing local gov- ernments and nonprots to rev up participation in the coming census, according to United States Census data. The census is a constitutionally mandated survey that is taken every 10 years to count each person where he or she lives on April 1. The rst census took place in 1790 and is only used for data gathering purposes, said Money, power, businessat stake in the2020census BY EMMA FREER AND ALI LINAN BE IN THE KNOW The 2020 census is starting up; here is what you need to know. Every household will receive an information mailer in mid-March. Everyone should be counted where they are living on April 1. The federal government disperses $675 billion annually among states based on population. Local governments, nonprots and schools rely on census funding.

AUTUMN RICH, COFOUNDER OF EVENT PRODUCTION AND FURNITURE RENTAL COMPANY PANACEA COLLECTIVE

SOURCE: U.S. CENSUS BUREAUCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE

Due to the fast-changing nature of coronavirus in the region, readers should visit communityimpact.com to nd the latest coverage on announcements, case numbers, school closures and more.

IMPACTS

TEXAS HONEY BEE FARM

29 MAUDIE’S HACIENDA

6

31

communityimpact.com

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