Women's Leadership

WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP

NIKET KARAJAGI profile

Professional Identity  Founder Director Atyaasaa Consulting Pvt. Ltd., Atyaasaa Consulting Foundation & Atyaasaa Global Alliances LLP

Professional Experience  Corporate experience in Sales and Marketing  Profit center management  Brand and franchise management  Entrepreneur with over 15 years in the field of management consulting and training internationally  Over 25000 hours of training and consulting experience  More than 2,00,000 professionals trained and coached  Consulting worldwide with 175 top notch organizations across all verticals  Authored management articles in various publications worldwide  Currently facilitating business expansions for European organizations

Training/Consulting/Coaching  Training worldwide in over 100 management topics  Setting up HRM practices  Helping organizations shift business orbits through Organization development projects  Executive coach to various CXO

Qualification  B.E. Mechanical  Master practitioner Neuro Linguistic Programming  Marshall Goldsmith certified and accredited coach  Certified DISC assessor and trainer through Wiley  MBTI – Step I and Step II practitioner  Saville assessment international accreditation  Certified in Design Thinking for Innovation

FEMALE EXECUTIVES where they do better

Parameters

Men

Women

Motivating others

*****

Fostering communication

****

Producing high quality work

*****

Strategic planning

**

**

Listening to others

*****

Analyzing issues

**

**

Note: Each * denotes which group scored higher on respective studies.

Reference: Weatherhead School of Management, Case Western Reserve University

WOMEN’S STRATEGIES for inspiring leadership Act authentically

Act powerfully

Make connections

Fostering feelings of wholeness

Gaining understanding of self and system

Source: Ruderman and Ohlott, What Women Leaders Want, Harvard Business Review, 2004

EUROPE women’s share of board seats

Norway 35.5%

Women’s share of board seats at European stock index companies

Finland 29.9%

France 29.7%

Sweden 28.8%

Belgium 23.4%

UK 22.8%

Parity

Denmark 21.9%

Netherland 21.0%

Women

Men

Germany 18.5%

Spain 18.2%

Switzerland 17.0%

Australia 13.0%

Ireland 10.3%

Portugal 7.9%

Men

Women

Source: 2014 Catalyst Census: Women Board of Directors, Catalyst.org

BARRIERS to women’s advancement

Organizational barriers

 Unfriendly corporate culture  Lack of systematic career development opportunities  Preference for homophily (gender similarity) Interpersonal barriers

 Biases, stereotyping, and preconceptions  Exclusion from informal networks  Lack of mentors

Personal challenges

 Lack of confidence, political savvy, negotiation skills  Home-life responsibilities

Reference: Weatherhead School of Management, Case Western Reserve University

THE GLASS CEILING

“The glass ceiling applies to women as a group who are kept from advancing higher because they are women.” ~Ann Morrison, author of Breaking the Glass Ceiling

“The seen, yet unreachable barrier that keeps minorities and women from rising to the upper rungs of the corporate ladder regardless of their qualifications or achievements.” ~Federal Glass Ceiling Commission, Solid Investments: Making Full Use of the Nation’s Human Capital. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Labour, November, 1995, p.4.

GENERATION OF GENDER BIAS impedes women’s leadership

First generation gender bias

Deliberate barriers

Overt discrimination

Second generation gender bias

Unconscious

Subtle Inadvertent barriers

GENERATION OF GENDER BIAS impedes women’s leadership

“The powerful yet often invisible barriers to women’s advancement that arise from cultural beliefs about gender, as well as workplace structures, practices and patterns of interaction that inadvertently favour men.” ~ Herminia Ibarra, Robin Aly and Deborah Kolb, Women Rising: The Unseen Barriers, Harvard Business Review, 2013.

THE GENDER CONFIDENCE GAP

Female humility and male hubris in estimates of intelligence

(Furnham, Hosoe and Tang 2001)

Internal attribution versus external attribution

(Carter and Dunning 2003)

Imposter syndrome: Women tended to ascribe achievements to luck, timings or contacts ( Clance and Imes 1978)

Women underestimated performance and ability depending on the sex-typing of the task (Lenny, 1977)

ACTIVATING SELF-CONFIDENCE

Self-awareness

Self-efficacy through focus on strength

Adaptability through flexing

Perseverance through

Authenticity through passion values and principles

tenacious initiative

Communicating powerfully and prolifically

IPR belongs to Atyaasaa

IN HINDSIGHT, I WISH I HAD… top 3 choices for 587 men and women

In hindsight, I wish I had…

Count (%)

Sought out mentoring relationships with higher- level management Participated in informal networks within my organization

185 (25%)

158 (21%)

Made sure I got credit for the work I do

135 (18%)

Participated in coaching

131 (17%)

Made a long-term career plan

122 (16%)

Discussed unwritten rules with supervisor

118 (16%)

Made my accomplishments known to others more senior

115 (15%)

Source: Unwritten Rules: Why Doing a Good Job May Not Be Enough. Catalyst, 2010

IN HINDSIGHT, I WISH I HAD… top 3 choices for 587 men and women

In hindsight, I wish I had…

Count (%)

Planned a career path early

97 (13%)

Been more outspoken about my career goals

96 (13%)

Participated in informal networks outside my organization

83 (11%)

Gained more experience in different roles

79 (11%)

Participated in formal networks

73 (10%)

Sought out feedback about my performance

92 (12%)

Asked about unwritten rules directly

63 (8%)

Source: Unwritten Rules: Why Doing a Good Job May Not Be Enough. Catalyst, 2010

TYPES OF NETWORKS

Task networks

Career networks

Social/support networks

Power networks

IPR belongs to Atyaasaa

COMPETENCIES top leaders exemplify most: women vs. men

Men Women

Takes initiative

Practices self-development

Displays high integrity and honesty

Drives for results

Develops others

Inspires and motivates others

0

100

Source: Study conducted by Jack Zenger and Joseph Folkman

COMPETENCIES top leaders exemplify most: women vs. men

Men Women

Builds relationships

Collaborations and team work

Establishes stretch goals

Champion change

Solves problems and analyzes issues

0

100

Source: Study conducted by Jack Zenger and Joseph Folkman

COMPETENCIES top leaders exemplify most: women vs. men

Men Women

Communicates powerfully and prolifically

Connects the group to the outside world

Innovates

Technical or professional expertize

Develops strategic perspective

0

100

Source: Study conducted by Jack Zenger and Joseph Folkman

TOP COMPETENCIES OF LEADERS

360 degree survey of 7,280 leaders from public, private, government, commercial companies around the world

Competency

Men Women

Takes initiative

48% 56%

Practices self-development

48% 55%

Displays high integrity and honesty

48% 54%

Drives for result

48% 54%

Inspires and motivates others

49% 54%

Builds relationships

49% 54%

Collaboration and teamwork

49% 53%

Source: Are women better than men? J. Zenger and J. Folkman, March 15, 2012 www.exed.hbs.edu/

TOP COMPETENCIES OF LEADERS

Competency

Men Women

Establishes stretch goals

49% 53%

Champion change

49% 53%

Solves problems, analyzes issues

50% 52%

Communicates powerfully

50% 52%

Connects the group to outside world

50% 51%

Innovates

50% 51%

Technical and professional expertize

50% 51%

Develops strategic perspective

51% 49%

Source: Are women better than men? J. Zenger and J. Folkman, March 15, 2012 www.exed.hbs.edu/

CORPORATE LADDER ladies vanish

In total 325,000 women had entry level positions

150,000 had made it to middle management

7,000 had made it to Vice President, Senior Vice President, or CEO On average 53% women made up of the entry level employees On average 40% women made up of managers On average 35% women made up of Directors

On average 27% women made up of Vice Presidents

On average 24% women made up of Senior Vice Presidents On average 19% women made up of Executives in C-Suite

Source: Unlocking the full potential of women at work by Jonna Barsh and Lareina Yee, Mckinsey and Company, 2013

WOMEN’S ACCESS to leadership positions

Educate men and women about second generation gender bias

Create safe identity workspaces to support transition to bigger roles

Anchor women’s development efforts in a sense of leadership purpose rather than in how women are perceived

Source: Women Rising: The Unseen Barriers, Harvard Business Review, 2013

SECOND GENERATION gender bias

Second-generation gender bias refers to workplace practices or normative patterns of interaction between the sexes that may appear neutral or non-sexist, in that they seem to apply to everyone, but which discriminate against or oppress females in social situations.

Barriers for women due to second generation gender bias

A paucity of role models for women

Gendered career paths and gendered work

Women’s lack of access to networks and sponsors

Double binds

Source: Women Rising: The Unseen Barriers, Harvard Business Review, 2013

CREATE SAFE identity workspaces

Safe space for learning, experimentation, and community

Considering performance feedback

Identifying common experiences at workplace

Building communities for women to discuss feedback, compare notes, and emotionally support one another’s learning

Source: Women Rising: The Unseen Barriers, Harvard Business Review, 2013

THANK YOU

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