Memory Care America - September 2019

Richard Kelly Finds a Home and Family at Memory Care of Simpsonville Sharing Your Stories

In her best-selling lifestyle guide “French Women Don’t Get Fat,” Mireille Guiliano advises women in their 50s to invest in a set of free weights — nothing too heavy, perhaps 3–5 pounds — in order to maintain their toned, youthful appearance and range of motion. She notes that lifting weights isn’t entirely necessary during your 20s and 30s, but it’s essential to maintain muscle tone and bone density in your later years. Though Guiliano’s evidence is anecdotal, the science confirms that lifting weights can be an indispensable aid to healthy aging for both men and women. A study published by the National Center for Biotechnology Information recommends strength training 2–3 times per week to lower your risk of health problems and preserve bone density, independence, and vitality. According to WebMD, “Muscle loss is one of the main reasons people feel less energetic as they get older. When you lift weights, work out on machines, use resistance bands, or do exercises with your own body weight (like pushups and situps), you build strength, muscle mass, and flexibility.” You don’t have to join a gym to reap the benefits though; just pick up a set of free weights and a resistance band and research how to safely use them in your own home. Bodybuilding.com recommends designing a workout routine that includes one or two exercises for each of the major muscle groups: legs, back, shoulders, arms, chest, and abs. Try 8–10 repetitions per set, but don’t push yourself to use heavy weights. Even options that are 10 pounds or less should be enough to keep you chasing after your grandchildren for years to come. One public figure who has taken the weightlifting creed to heart is Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. The documentary “RBG” shows the 86-year- old judge at the gym, pumping lightweight iron with her personal trainer, and she even walked spring chicken Stephen Colbert through her routine on “The Late Show.” Ginsburg has called her trainer “the most important person” in her life apart from her family, which is a ringing endorsement for lifting weights if ever there was one. STAY TONED BY LIFTING WEIGHTS AT HOME The Anti-Aging Benefits of Free Weights

Frank Kelly didn’t have to tour Memory Care of Simpsonville to know it was the right facility for his father. Richard Kelly’s health had deteriorated so much at the facility he was previously living in that he was hospitalized for dehydration and malnutrition. Frank was at his wits’ end looking for the two employees who had made sure his Vietnam veteran father was happy and healthy. But the employees, Andy Garrison and

Geri Catlaine, had left the facility. When the doctor heard about this quest, they called Memory Care of Simpsonville, where they knew Geri and Andy were working. Geri quickly called Frank, who raced toward Memory Care of Simpsonville to register his father. Headed in the opposite direction, Andy and an ambulance went to pick up Richard and bring him to his new home. “I said, 'Geri, would you put your mother here?' And she said yes. And I said, ‘Give me the paperwork.’ And then we went on the tour of the facility,” Frank recalls. "When Andy came back to the facility … we saw each other and shook hands and gave each other a hug.” After nearly a year in Memory Care of Simpsonville, Richard has found his home. As if Frank needed any more assurance that his father would be taken care of again, Richard was singing karaoke the day after he moved into the community! It was quite the feat for the 11-year Air Force veteran who once taught Survival, Evasion, Resistance, and Escape (SERE) training to military members. Today, Richard swaps war stories with his fellow community members and the staff at Memory Care of Simpsonville. Once an escape artist, Richard no longer feels compelled to slip out the doors, and when he can’t sleep, his favorite nurse gives him projects or chores. Frank trusts the staff to care for his father so much that if he isn’t available, both Geri and Andy have power of attorney over Richard. “He smiles, he gained 20 pounds, he’s not enraged and wanting to hit anyone anymore,” Frank says. “They go the extra mile when no one else will … It’s got to be the greatest facility that I’ve ever seen … I’ve given out about 1,500 of your cards already.” You don’t have to keep our work a secret; referrals are the best compliment you can give us. If you would like to be featured in our newsletter or if you know a family that could benefit from our services, please call 833.MEM.CARE (636.2273) or visit MemoryCareAmerica.com. The family Richard had found for himself was finally reunited.

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