NWCF 2022 Impact Report

Impact Report

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Letter from the Leadership

Dear Friends,

As we reflect on the past year, we are thankful for those who make up the NWCF community – our partner agencies, donors, event sponsors, volunteers, and you – for showing steadfast commitment to children and families. The short- and long-term effects of the pandemic and significant health inequities continue to impact children and families in our region. At the same time, we celebrate the life-changing impact of the work happening each day, whether it is a family that has found stable housing after homelessness, or the young man who is setting and reaching his own goals with the help of his mentor (see Partner Agency Spotlight on page 11). In the upcoming pages, you will see a snapshot of what the NWCF community has accomplished in the past year. Here are some of the highlights: Another amazing year of investment Thanks to your partnership, we invested $1M in programs lifting up children, youth, and families. Our partner agencies are a continuous source of inspiration. Their staff on the ground know firsthand what kids and young people are experiencing right now, what they need, and what serves them best. As they adapt and respond with creativity and determination to the enormous challenges of their clients, they have underscored how NWCF is providing critical support. Strength in community For real change to happen, we need to recognize and honor community voices, community expertise, and the power of lived experience. Our 2022 Forum, Buffering Intergenerational Trauma: Child Well-Being and Community Resilience , focused on the strengths intrinsic within our communities and how we can honor them when we work with children. Our five Forum speakers – “united by hope,” in the words of panelist moderator Dr. Ben Danielson – shone a light on a community-based approach to healing. Although we came together virtually, we felt the powerful effect of learning, listening, and finding inspiration together. What’s coming next We have listened deeply to those working directly with children and families and have learned about their needs beyond funding . In response, we are expanding our educational outreach to fill the gap in affordable and high-value education for those in the field. We will be sharing more about this endeavor in the upcoming year. Meanwhile, we continue our long-term commitment to children and families in our communities and to the agencies that work with them. You will see in the following pages that we have committed to multiyear, unrestricted funding for nearly two-thirds of our partner agencies. In short, we are working hard and feeling hopeful. Despite ongoing challenges, we are optimistic because we know the NWCF community is strong, resilient, and committed to change.

Victoria Peattie Helm Chief Executve Officer

Adrienne Heile Chief Program Officer

In partnership,

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About NW Children’s Foundation

NW Children’s Foundation works to end the intergenerational cycle of child abuse, neglect, and trauma. We envision a world in which all children thrive in safe, equitable, and nurturing communities. Our mission can only be fulfilled by putting racial equity and social justice at the center of every aspect of our work.

NW Children’s Foundation

2100 24th Ave S. Suite 320 Seattle, WA 98144

206-682-8447 nwcf.org

Chief Executive Officer Victoria Peattie Helm

President Laura Kerr

President-Elect Tim Stienstraw Vice President Roshaé Lowe Treasurer Elizabeth Warman Secretary Elaine Porterfield Board Members Teryn Bench Meg Burnham Brad Dear Alexandra Geneser Debra Gumbardo

Kayla Higgins Nitasha Mago Ashley Mallinson O’Neil Terri Pauly Frank Podany Malika Shanbhag Briana Smith Sissi Sondgroth

Michael Stark Natalia Stimac Jackie Valentine Heidi Vanderlaan De’Shanel White Tess Willkins

Thanks to your generosity, we were able to provide outreach and grants impacting critical points in the cycle of child abuse, neglect, and trauma.

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2022 by the Numbers

Our 2022 Forum welcomed:

from 135 towns & cities 1,200 participants and 272 organizations

Clockwise from left: Dr. Ben Danielson, Shivon Brite, Keoki Kauanoe, Dr. Kristina Lovato. Center: Dr. Kandace Thomas

NWCF’s Sources & Uses of Funds Fiscal Year Ending in 2022

Sources Private Donations

783,709 694,234 64,200

Special Events (net of cost of goods sold)

Income from Operating Endowment*

284,985 $1,827,128

Planned Use of Reserves**

84.65% Program Expense 15.35% Administrative & Fundraising Expense

Uses Grants & Other Program Expense

1,546,663 280,465 $1,827,128

Administrative & Fundraising Expense

* The Mary Ketcham Kerr Endowment for NWCF operations had reached a value of $1,233,056 at the end of the fiscal year. ** NWCF had accumulated excess reserves to support its current strategic growth efforts and budgeted to use some of those funds in FYE 22.

For the fiscal year ending July 31, 2022, NWCF’s total revenue was $1,732,343, program expenses were $1,546,663, and ending net assets were $1,505,215.

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2022 Grant Distribution: $1,000,000

14% fostering parent-child attachment & parenting skills 17% helping homeless youth to build resources & resilience 12% helping families escape & recover from violent homes 14% transitioning homeless families to stability & self-reliance 17% mentoring & tutoring to guide & support at-risk youth 10% building foster care & adoption to promote permanency 16% treatment to heal children who have experienced abuse

Grants by County

9.6%

10.5%

Pierce $47,500

Skagit/Whatcom $95,000

10.0%

62.3%

Snohomish $104,000

Clark/Lewis $28,000 Island/Jefferson/ Thurston $99,250

4.8%

King $616,750

2.8%

NWCF’s Ripple Effect 1 NWCF Forum 1,200 participants 330,000+ families helped extrapolated from attendee survey responses

NWCF Grants $1M partner agencies 76 children served 235,000+ taken from estimates in grant applications

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NWCF 2022 Grantmaking

S tSrternegntghtehnei n gi n Fg aFma iml i ei lsi e s We provide grants that prevent child abuse and neglect for families at the greatest risk , and that support healing and stability for families impacted by domestic violence and homelessness. We prioritize programs that use integrated services to help build family protective factors. Healing Children These grants help children who have suffered abuse and neglect heal from their traumatic experiences and find permanency and stability . We prioritize programs that target long-term benefits that build resilience and halt the intergenerational cycle of abuse, neglect, and trauma.

*30,000

Amara: Parenting and adoption services to create safety and permanence for at-risk and special-needs foster children. Center for Children & Youth Justice: Innovative approaches to systemic change to support kids, stabilize families, and strengthen communities. Child Advocacy Center of Snohomish County at Dawson Place: Coordinated medical, mental health, advocacy, protection, and law- enforcement services for children in Snohomish County who have suffered abuse. Childhaven: Trauma care and treatment services to strengthen families and support the healing of children ages 0-5 who have experienced trauma. Children’s Therapy Center: Services for special needs children provided by trained social workers, occupational therapists, family resources coordinators, and speech therapists. Encompass: Fully-equipped mobile lab to facilitate therapy programs for children and families in rural areas, homeless shelters, transitional housing, and schools. Family Law CASA: Advocacy for children in high-risk custody cases. HopeSparks Family Services: Family support, education, and specialized counseling for children who have suffered trauma. Jumping Mouse Children’s Center: Long-term, expressive mental health therapy for children who have suffered trauma. Kindering: Services to promote the social and emotional well-being of children involved in the child welfare system and living in out-of-home placements. King County Sexual Assault Resource Center: Parent education and therapy to help non-offending caregivers respond to their child who has been sexually abused and improve safety for their children.

8,250

15,000

*30,000

12,500

*30,000

*30,000

Lutheran Community Services Northwest: Safe, secure, and permanent homes for children who have experienced abuse and neglect. Navos: Early intervention to help young children and their caregivers form secure attachments and break cycles of abuse and neglect. Northwest Family Life Learning and Counseling Center: Emergency transitional housing, counseling, and advocacy services for children and families facing domestic violence and trauma. Northwest Immigrant Rights Project: Legal services and advocacy for abused, abandoned, and undocumented immigrant children. Olive Crest: Recruitment, training, certification, and ongoing support of foster families for children who have suffered abuse and/or neglect. Olympic Angels: Consistent support to foster care youth and families through intentional giving, relationship building, and mentorship.

*30,000

*30,000

*30,000

10,500

*100,000

18,500

*30,000

*30,000

*30,000

8,250

* Multi-year grants; amounts shown are distributed over a three-year period.

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NW Children’s Foundation 2022 Grants

Healing Children (continued) Pediatric Interim Care Center: Immediate, short-term, medically supervised care for drug- exposed and fragile infants. Ryther: Residential and outpatient behavioral and mental health services for children who have suffered trauma. Secret Harbor: Therapeutic foster care, in-home support, and residential treatment services for young people who have experienced significant trauma. Sound: A cross-system collaborative mental health and advocacy program for children and families impacted by domestic violence. TeamChild: Advocacy and specialized legal services connecting high-needs youth in crisis with support programs and services.

*30,000

*30,000

Toddler Learning Center: Education services and therapy in the home for young children with intensive medical, mental, or social risk factors. Wonderland Child & Family Services: Early diagnosis and treatment for children ages 0-13 with developmental delays or disabilities due to prenatal substance exposure. Youthnet: Social and educational programs to improve outcomes for youth most at risk of child abuse and neglect, poverty, school failure, substance abuse, and other challenges . YWCA Clark County: Therapeutic preschool and child care model to support children who have experienced homelessness and/or trauma. YWCA Pierce County: Comprehensive services and therapeutic intervention for children and families who have witnessed or experienced domestic violence in their home.

*30,000

15,000

*30,000

15,000

13,000

18,000

*30,000

7,500

Strengthening Families These grants prevent child abuse and neglect for families at the greatest risk and support healing and stability for families impacted by domestic violence and homelessness. We prioritize programs that use integrated services to help build family protective factors.

*30,000

14,250

Abused Deaf Women’s Advocacy Services: Housing, counseling, parenting and children’s programs for Deaf and DeafBlind victims of sexual/domestic violence. Anacortes Family Center: Comprehensive services to families experiencing homelessness, including shelter, affordable housing options, and community advocacy. Brigid Collins Family Support Center: Evidence-based services including therapy, case management, and parenting education for at-risk families with children from birth to 12 years. Child Care Action Council of Thurston County: Support for early learning communities through child care, early learning, and parent education. Children’s Home Society of WA: High-quality child and family support services, including finding adoptive families and permanent homes for children in foster care. Consejo Counseling and Referral Services: Advocacy services and transitional housing to domestic violence survivors and their children to foster independence and greater self-sufficiency.

Domestic Abuse Women’s Network (DAWN): Advocacy, mental health therapy, emergency shelter, 24-hour crisis and support line, and an expanded program for youth in order to end the generational cycle of domestic abuse. Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Services: Services to increase child safety and prevent future violence for families who have experienced domestic violence. Domestic Violence Services of Snohomish County: Community education, shelter, case management, and integrated support for victims of domestic abuse and their children. East African Community Services: Innovative education, mentorship, advocacy, and parent engagement programs, developed by and for the communities they serve.

15,000

*30,000

*30,000

*100,000

10,000

14,000

14,250

Your reliable support year after year has helped us not only sustain our operations, but to grow and expand our work to support families experiencing homelessness to find housing and

13,100

stay stably housed. – 2022 Partner Agency

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NW Children’s Foundation 2022 Grants

Strengthening Families (continued)

*30,000

*100,000

Family Education and Support Services: Skills, activities, and resources to support related caregivers of children who have suffered abuse to ensure their families thrive. Housing Hope: High-quality child development services to children and their parents specifically designed to meet the needs of families experiencing homelessness or poverty. Interfaith Association of NW Washington: Referral, support, and advocacy services for families during and after their stay in emergency shelter. LifeWire: Support groups, advocacy assistance, and one-on-one counseling for children and youth who have experienced violence or abuse. Lydia Place: Parent educator home visits, group parenting education, and therapeutic interventions for children in shelters and transitional housing. Mary’s Place: Safe, inclusive shelter and services to support women, children, and families on their journey out of homelessness. New Beginnings: Support for domestic violence survivors and their families including legal, financial, mental health, housing, and referral services. New Phoebe House Association: Comprehensive recovery and reunification program for families who face multiple challenges and are involved with the child welfare system.

Parent Trust for Washington Children: Support and education services for high-risk, underserved families through every stage of a child’s life. SafePlace: Basic needs and comprehensive, age-appropriate support services for children and teens in families who have experienced domestic violence. Solid Ground Washington: Programs and support for children who have experienced homelessness and domestic violence. Vashon Youth and Family Services: Wrap-around and trauma-informed programs that promote protective factors for Island children and families to reduce the likelihood of child abuse and neglect. Vine Maple Place: Comprehensive housing and support services for single parents and their children to build stability and self-sufficiency. Vision House: Transitional housing and integrated support services for homeless mothers and their children. Wellspring Family Services: Trauma-informed early learning center and parenting support serving families experiencing homelessness. Youth Eastside Services: Research-based mental health interventions for young children with risk factors for poor brain development.

*30,000

*30,000

*30,000

*30,000

*30,000

*30,000

*30,000

*100,000

12,000

*30,000

12,000

*30,000

*30,000

18,000

Empowering Youth These grants help youth fulfill their potential, so they can make good life decisions and break the intergenerational cycle of abuse, neglect, and trauma. We prioritize programs that focus on instilling youth with necessary assets to grow into strong, responsible adults, including positive role models and peer support.

8,000

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Island County: Enduring, professionally supported one-to- one mentoring relationships for Island County children aged 6-16 facing adversity. Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southwest Washington: Mentoring for children who are at risk of dropping out, violence, substance abuse, and other juvenile problem behaviors. Cocoon House: Housing and wraparound support services for homeless young people 12 to 17 years old, and their children.

*30,000

*30,000

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NW Children’s Foundation 2022 Grants

Empowering Youth (continued)

*30,000

Communities In Schools of Lakewood: Mentoring, tutoring, and wraparound support for underserved students provided through a network of community volunteers. Communities In Schools of Renton: Mentoring, tutoring, and wraparound support services for underserved students provided through a network of community volunteers. Community Network Council: Emotional and academic intervention, support, advocacy, and community building for Black and Brown youth and families. Community Passageways: Alternatives to incarceration for youth and young adults through restorative and culturally relevant programming, mentorships, legal support, and more. Eastside Academy: Education, addiction recovery, mental health counseling, housing, and mentor relationships for students. Friends of the Children: Long-term professional mentoring to guide children facing tough challenges to reach their potential and achieve their goals. Friends of Youth: Housing, support services, and case management for homeless young parents and their children. New Horizons Ministries: Safe shelter, case management, mental health services, employment, and housing support for youth and young adults experiencing homelessness. Northwest Education Access: Higher education advocacy and opportunities for young people struggling to overcome poverty and adversity. Northwest Youth Services: Emergency housing and case management for homeless youth ages 13-17. Rochester Organization of Families: Resources and services for children, youth, and families to achieve a healthy, positive and drug- free community.

*30,000

13,000

15,000

*30,000

ROOTS: Emergency shelter, case management, and access to a continuum of support services for homeless young adults in Seattle’s University District. SafeFutures Youth Center: Comprehensive services to help low-income and refugee/ immigrant youth build healthy futures and break down barriers that hinder success. Skagit Valley Family YMCA: Emergency shelter, drop-in services, case management, and referrals for Skagit County youth ages 13-17. Sound Discipline: Partners with educators, organizations, and families to transform schools into equitable learning communities. Street Youth Ministries: Drop-in center, case management, activities, and outreach to mitigate immediate and long-term harms for unhoused youth and young adults ages 13-26. Teen Feed: Low-barrier/trauma-focused crisis intervention, service referrals, and life-skills mentorship for homeless, high-risk youth. The Mockingbird Society : Foster care system development through youth leadership, legislative advocacy, and extended family model for foster care. Treehouse: Comprehensive support for the educational needs of youth in foster care. Youth Tutoring Program (CCS): Tutoring to elementary, middle, and high school youth living in six low-income and public housing communities in Seattle.

7,000

*30,000

*100,000

15,000

*30,000

*75,000

15,400

7,000

*30,000

*30,000

*30,000

*100,000

*30,000

*30,000

*30,000

We sincerely appreciate this ongoing partnership with NWCF. Investments like yours make it possible to continue walking alongside youth in their journey to a happy, healthy adulthood. – 2022 Partner Agency

$1,000,000

Total 2022 Grants:

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Corporate Sponsors

Thanks to our sponsors, 100% of event contributions from individuals go to heal and prevent child abuse, neglect, and trauma.

NW Children’s Foundation Forum - February 2 Buffering Intergenerational Trauma: Child Well-Being and Community Resilience

Premier Premera Blue Cross

Benefactor Kaiser Permanente Perigee Fund Washington State Department of Children, Youth and Families Leader Alaska Children’s Trust Raikes Foundation

Streaming Partner Evia

Advocate Thomas V. Giddens Jr. Foundation

Patron Mat-Su Health Foundation

Partner Medina Foundation

Thank you so much for these powerful Forums. Each and every one is mind-altering toward hope, justice, and better outcomes for the children and families we serve. – Steve Shapiro, King County Public Health

NW Children’s Foundation Gala + Auction - May 14

Reimagine: A Brighter Future for Kids

Brighter Future Partner Isola Homes Presenting Sponsor Baird Private Wealth Management

Platinum Sponsors Kerry Propel Insurance Gold Sponsors Fremont Studios John Howie Catering

Corporate Table Sponsor Stoel Rives LLP

Silver Sponsors Heritage Bank Pedersen’s Event Rentals

Runde & Co. LLC Trophy Cupcakes

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Partner Agency Spotlight

Friends of the Children Friends of the Children–Seattle partners with community organizations, schools, and foster care systems to identify children ages 4 to 6 facing the toughest systemic barriers, pairing them with a professional mentor from kindergarten through high school. Richmond became Damarion’s professional mentor when Damarion was in fifth grade. Throughout the struggles of middle school and high school, Richmond partnered closely with Damarion’s family to help him build the skills he needed to succeed socially and academically.

Over the years, Damarion and Richmond have spent their time together working on Damarion’s goals.

“He really dedicates himself to anything that has to do with getting him prepared for the next thing,” said Richmond. When Damarion wanted to focus on health, they worked out together. Before Damarion got his license, Richmond helped him study for his driver’s test. When Damarion was on the field for a football game or track meet, Richmond was a familiar face in the stands. Richmond describes their relationship as more of a partnership.

“We are grateful for NW Children’s Foundation’s committed partnership. They are truly an example of how important partnerships like these are to sustain our 12-plus-year journey alongside our youth as they realize their power to achieve their goals and dreams.”

“It’s equal all the way out. He knows what he needs and wants and we just find ways to do it.”

Damarion’s Next Goal: College Bound Damarion recently graduated from high school with a full- ride scholarship to Huston-Tillotson University in Austin, Texas, where he will study education. Richmond knows that Damarion is ready to take on these exciting chang- es. He’s also confident that their relationship will remain strong.

– Lacie West, Executive Director of Friends of the Children–Seattle

Friends of the Children–Seattle is a NWCF Evergreen grantee, receiving a three-year grant of $100,000. Evergreen grantees are longtime partners of NWCF that consistently demonstrate their high impact and effectiveness in halting the intergenerational cycle of trauma, abuse, and neglect.

“It might not be week to week, but it’s not going to stop,” said Richmond.

When Damarion’s next goal comes around, they’ll tackle it together.

NONPROFIT U.S. Postage PAID Seattle, WA Permit # 2135

21OO 24th Ave S. Suite 32O Seattle, WA 98144

www.nwcf.org | 2O6.682.8447

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