In The Bag September 2018

WICHITA’S HANGER

DAVE’S GROWTH STRATEGY

Moving Beyond Checklist Mode

September 2018

“A goal without a timeline is just a dream.” –Robert Herjavec

multiplies toward a stronger family. So that goal shifts to the “goals” column and becomes one of the five goals that you’re going to tackle this quarter. You set a target date for it. When you accomplish it, it shifts over to the “wins” column, and you get to celebrate.

Have you ever felt like you’re stuck in a rut? Each day, you eat breakfast, cram in a workout, shuttle the kids about, do the laundry, pay those bills, get everyone fed before 9 p.m. … and wake up the next day to do it all again. You’re in checklist mode. Three years ago, I was there. I felt like my mindset was stuck in checklist mode at work and at home, and it wasn’t helping me to reach personal or professional goals. What I’ve learned since then has changed the way I set my goals. Instead of going through a checklist, I ask myself whether or not what I’m doing adds value to my long-term goals. Many successful people plan months, years, and even generations into the future to consider what kind of impact their actions today could have on tomorrow. It’s the perspective I adopted to set goals in a more effective way. This goal-setting shift led our team to hone in on our purpose and values. We started to filter everything by asking whether or not they aligned with our core values and other questions to reach the core strategy of what would help us grow. We asked what was motivating to us and what was meaningful. Would these things direct us toward what we wanted to accomplish? This led us to use the “3 m’s” as a requirement for any goal that was put in place. Here’s what that looks like in action: Every quarter, we take all the ideas we have — ways to improve life, work, family relationships — and write them down in an “on deck” column. From there, we decide which of those relate to our core values and strengths, and you test them by asking the 3 m’s: Is it motivational? Is it meaningful? Is it multiplying? For the goals that fit the rubric, they move into the “go time” column. Then, you set a target date and decide how you will celebrate your wins. For example, your goal might be for Mom and Dad to have a date night once a week. Going through the 3 m’s, you determine that it is a meaningful goal, it is motivating, those date nights will multiply and help Mom and Dad have a better relationship, and that bond

goals growth 90 day

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strengths: 1 2 3 4 5

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3 m ’s is it m otivating? is it m eaningful? is it m ultiplying?

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That’s a key part of your goals — choosing how to reward yourself after reaching them. For my team and my family, having a reward in sight at the end is a crucial part of goal-setting. For example, my family has chosen a long weekend trip and a dad-and-daughter day as some of our rewards. At work, we all go out for a nice steak dinner. Why is the reward part so important? I have a friend who works at a big company. When they reach a big goal at work, they spend about two minutes acknowledging what they accomplished. How are you going to stay motivated for the next goal if that’s your only celebration? The celebration is a tangible and meaningful way to connect to your goal.

What’s your goal-setting strategy? Do you celebrate when you reach them? I’d love to hear about how you celebrate your wins!

P.S. I’d love to share our goal-setting strategy with you! Just email owner@ inthebagcleaners.com and we’ll send you a PDF of the 90-day growth goal template.

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