Franklin - Brentwood Edition - January 2020

FRANKLIN BRENTWOOD EDITION

VOLUME XX, ISSUE XX  XXXXXXXXXX, 2020 2020 ANNUAL COMMUNITYGUIDE COMMUNITY INFO 7 TOP STORY TO WATCH IN 2020

I

ONLINE AT

VOLUME 1, ISSUE 11  JAN. 27FEB. 23, 2020

Franklin’s need for aordable housing continues

DINING LISTINGS

8

SHOPPING LISTINGS

9

The Village at West Main Street is one of a few examples of aordable housing in the Franklin area. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)

EDUCATION

11

City Administrator Eric Stuckey said that in his 11 years with the city of Franklin, providing attainable hous- ing for residents has always been a main topic of conversation in the community. BY ALEX HOSEY AND WENDY STURGES

“I think it’s always been an issue,” Stuckey said. “In a way, we are victims of our own success, in that real estate values continue to climb, and while that has a lot of positives, that can also be challenging in terms of providing housing that aligns with the workforce

in our community.” Stuckey said aordable housing has only gotten to be a larger issue during the last ve years. According to data released inDecem- ber from the U.S. Census Bureau’s

DEVELOPMENT

13

DINING FEATURE BUSINESS FEATURE

16

17

REAL ESTATE

20

CONTINUED ON 14

City moves to balance resident concerns amid growing tourism Franklin puts limits on short-termrentals

AN ATTRACTIVE AREA Franklin’s reputation as a destination has brought millions in spending to the area but has also spurred a rise in short-term rentals.

BY ALEX HOSEY

of that number.” With the growing number of tourists coming to Franklincame an increase in thenumber of short- term vacation rental properties in the city limits, rising from 220 active rentals in 2016 to over 500 in late 2019, according to AirDNA, a website that tracks the performance of short-term rentals. As a part of the city of Franklin’s recently enacted citywide zoning ordinance, which was developed throughout 2019 and adopted at the CONTINUED ON 19

400 500

When Ellie Westman Chin started in her posi- tion as the president and CEO of the Williamson County Convention and Visitors Bureau ve years ago, she said the bureau formulated a stra- tegic plan with the hope of bringing 2 million visitors to the area by the end of 2020. “That was a pretty aggressive goal based on what our growth had already been,” Westman Chin said. “But in 2018, we had 1.72 million vis- itors, so it got us really within striking distance

Q1 Q3

Q2 Q4

300

200

0 100

2016*

2017

2018

2019*

communityimpact.com

Made with FlippingBook flipbook maker