Happy National Athletic Training Month

Spring sports seasons are in full swing and summer leagues will be here before you know it. How can you make sure you are properly conditioned so that you avoid injuries that could sideline you for one game or the season? Spring sport seasons are in full swi g and summer l agues will b h re b f re you know it. How can you ma sure you are p operly conditioned so that you avoid njuries that could sideline y u for one game or the seaso

According to the National Children’s Hospital, 50 percent of sports-related injuries could have been avoided had the athletes completed an effective conditioning and training regimen before starting competition in their respective sport. When you are designing a training program, it’s important to look at these aspects:  Time table: when are you starting? According to the N tional Children’s Hospital, 50 percent f ports-related injuries could hav been avoide ad e athletes completed an effective c ditioni g and training r gim n before starting compet tion in their respective sport. When you are designing a trainin program, it’s important to look at thes a pects:  Tim tabl : wh n are you starting?

 Baseline of fitness  Movement skills  General conditioning principles  Sports-specific goals  The athlete’s physical capacity  Baseline of fitness  Movement skills  General c ditioning rinciples  Sports-specific goals  T athlete’ physic l capacity At LSTC, wh n we work with athletes to create a trainin program, we design the program around four ‘season’ of the sp 1. Post Season– The initial 1-3 mon hs aft the regul r season w n at lete as the opportunity to rest and r cup both mentally and physically. It also giv s athlet an scape to avoid burnout. 2. Off Season– Lasts about 4-6 mon hs aft r the post se son and focuses primarily o s rength, f exibility and e duranc decrease the risk of injury. Intense c ditioning should be performed 3 to 5 times a week. 3. Pre Season– Roughly 1 to 2 months before the regul r seas n, workouts begin to shift from s rength training to p specific c ditioning, agil ty drills and ovement skills to nsure athlete will perf rm optimally at the start of the sea 4. Regul r Season– This involves training 4 to 6 days a week to help maintain aerobic and anaer bic c ditioning to imp fitness level. During this time, weightlifting shoul b don twic a week. General Principles of Conditioning: 1. Warm Up/ C ol Down: Increase bl od flo to warm the muscles 2. Motivation: Ke p athle s int rested; G T CR ATIVE! 3. Overload: Wo k harder than normal o put good stress on the body, wh c will lp the body adapt and improve 4. Consistency: C ditioning regularly is effective 5. Progression: Gradually increase he intensity (reps/weights) to increase athlete’ physical ability 6. In ensity: Wo k harder f short periods of time 7. Specificity: Perform drills specific to athlete’s sport 8. Indiv duality: Design a program specific to the individual athlete 9. Minimize tre s: Push athle e but llow ad qua e rest 10. Safety: Use safe techniques and proper equipment At LSTC, when we work with athletes to create a training program, we design the program around four ‘season’ of the sport: 1. Post Season– The initial 1-3 months after the regular season when the athlete has the opportunity to rest and recuperate both mentally and physically. It also gives the athlete an escape to avoid burnout. 2. Off Season– Lasts about 4-6 months after the post season and focuses primarily on strength, flexibility and endurance to decrease the risk of injury. Intense conditioning should be performed 3 to 5 times a week. 3. Pre Season– Roughly 1 to 2 months before the regular season, workouts begin to shift from strength training to sports- specific conditioning, agility drills and movement skills to ensure the athlete will perform optimally at the start of the season. 4. Regular Season– This involves training 4 to 6 days a week to help maintain aerobic and anaerobic conditioning to improve fitness level. During this time, weightlifting should be done twice a week. General Principles of Conditioning: 1. Warm Up/ Cool Down: Increase blood flow to warm the muscles 2. Motivation: Keep the athletes interested; GET CREATIVE! 3. Overload: Work harder than normal to put good stress on the body, which will help the body adapt and improve 4. Consistency: Conditioning regularly is effective 5. Progression: Gradually increase the intensity (reps/weights) to increase the athlete’s physical ability 6. Intensity: Work harder for short periods of time 7. Specificity: Perform drills specific to the athlete’s sport 8. Individuality: Design a program specific to the individual athlete 9. Minimize stress: Push the athlete but allow adequate rest 10. Safety: Use safe techniques and proper equipment

Continued... It’s important for us to understand the individual athlete’s physical capacity and the sport for which they’re training. We would not work with a long distance runner on heavy weight squats like we would a sprinter simply because these two sports don’t require the same forces on the body. By tailoring each training program, we are helping develop each athlete’s ability to perform at the optimal level of competition. Continu It’s important for us to understand the individua athlete’s physical apacity the sp t for which they’re training. We would n t work with a long dista runner on heavy weight squats like we would a sp inter simply because these sports don’t requir the same forces on the bod . By tailoring each trai program, we are helping dev lop e c athlete’s ability to perform at the opti level of competition.

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