Marc Lopez Law December 2018

DECEMBER 2018 LOPEZ LAW

FROM THE DESK OF

Marc Lopez

SEASON OF JOY, SEASON OF STRESS

How do I love the holiday season? Let me count the ways. I love the incandescent bulbs that frame windows, line roofs, and light the sky with good cheer. I love the family time spent around a crackling fire. I love catching up with friends who are in town for their annual visit. I love decorating the Christmas tree with my wife and daughter as if it’s the most important thing in the world. If the holidays have a drawback, it’s this: More people get in trouble this time of year. No matter how hard I work — and I put in a lot of hours at the office — the months of November and December always seem to present me with more business than I’m prepared for. While it’s both economically desirable and professionally satisfying to know that my services are in demand, I can’t help but feel sad that so many people find themselves facing criminal charges in the midst of the season of joy. business and trace it directly to people’s increased levels of stress. I tend to see Christmas as overwhelmingly positive, so I need to remind myself that not everyone is as lucky as I am. Some people live paycheck-to-paycheck, and that doesn’t leave a lot of room for material generosity. Some people don’t have family to spend time with, or they aren’t on good terms with the family they do have. Some people lack basic necessities like a hot meal and a roof. No matter what you have going on in your life, the holiday season seems to amplify and add to it, and this is on top of the overcommitted lives we already lead. The less adept you are at managing your stress, the more likely you are to do something you’ll regret. Before you reach for the bottle, take some deep breaths. Try to treat yourself like someone you actually care about. I’m no mind-reader, but I am a keen observer of human behavior. I don’t find it especially hard to look at the uptick in my holiday

“Yesterday, Dec. 7, 1941—a date which will live in infamy— the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the empire of Japan. […] It will be recorded that the distance of Hawaii from Japan makes it obvious that the attack was deliberately planned many days or even weeks ago. [...] With confidence in our armed forces, with the unbounding determination of our people, we will gain the inevitable triumph— so help us, God. I ask that the Congress declare that, since the unprovoked and dastardly attack by Japan on Sunday, Dec. 7, 1941, a state of war has existed between the United States and the Japanese empire.” –President Franklin D. Roosevelt The attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 led to the severe destruction of the United States Pacific Fleet, but it lit a flame in the hearts of Americans. The sudden strike by the Japanese forces destroyed 20 American vessels, eight of which were battleships, and over 300 airplanes. Over 2,000 military and civilian American lives were lost, and another 1,000 suffered injuries. The following day, President Roosevelt gave his Pearl Harbor address to the nation, urging Congress to take action and declare war on Japan. This event brought the citizens of America together for the first time since WWII began. It was time to go to war. Although the attack caught America by surprise, the war had seemed unavoidable for some time. In 1937, Japan declared war on China to seize its import market for financial gain and to expand Japan’s territory. The Japanese government had been struggling with economic and social issues, and its leaders REMEMBERING PEARL HARBOR The Attack That Brought World War II to America

Finally, if you’re going to drink, don’t drive. If you’re going to drive, don’t drink. And when all else fails, always remember to Plead the Fifth.

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When You Can’t Stop the Fall, Roll With It Slipping & Falling sought to solve these problems by taking the land of neighboring countries. In retaliation, America attempted to intimidate Japan by banning further trade with them. Instead, this action only made the Japanese government more reluctant to leave China. In the years that followed Japan’s declaration, Washington, D.C., and Tokyo engaged in negotiations, but neither was willing to budge. Japanese forces planned their attack on the United States for several months before putting their devastating plans into action. Their goal was to destroy the United States Pacific Fleet in order to remove any opposition to their takeover of the South Pacific. While their attack was incredibly damaging, it didn’t incapacitate the fleet. Pearl Harbor’s aircraft carriers were away when the attack took place and were considered the most important aspect of a naval fleet at that time. The Japanese also failed to destroy the U.S. Navy’s oil storage depots, repair shops, and submarine and shipyard docks, allowing the navy to recuperate quickly from the attack.

There are many memorials to remind U.S. citizens of that day. A marble memorial was built over the fallen USS Arizona, dedicated to all military persons who were killed in the attack. Another monument was built on the northwest shore of Ford Island, close to where the USS Utah sank. In later years, the ship was added to the national register of historic places and was declared a national historic landmark.

Dec. 7 serves as National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day. It honors individuals who survived the attack and those who did not. Remember those who lost their lives on that day and throughout WWII and the other brave soldiers who fought to keep the freedoms we have today.

Slick roads and icy sidewalks become part of the landscape every winter, and every year the risk of falling is very real. For many people, avoiding a fall can be difficult enough without ice coating every walkable surface. Young or old, here are a few ways you can stay on your feet this month. The correct footwear can save you from a nasty tumble or heart-stopping slip. Finding boots that are specifically designed to keep you steady on a slippery surface is a must. It’s also a great idea to buy waterproof footwear to keep your feet warm and dry in the snow. Ice cleats can be helpful as well; they slip over your regular shoes and give you the added grip you need. If you don’t want to wear your winter boots anywhere but outside, bring an extra set of shoes with you so that you can switch once indoors. IF THE BOOT FITS

you balance should you start to slip. It also helps to spread your weight out evenly by not walking with your feet close together. Try not to be distracted when you’re walking on ice — keep your eyes forward and make sure you know where you’re placing your feet.

KNOWING HOW TO FALL

Unfortunately, even with all the precautions in the world, falls still happen. While no one has invented a way to trip and fall gracefully, there are a few ways you can avoid a serious injury when it does happen. If you find yourself starting to fall, lean forward to help prevent a direct impact to your spine or the back of your head. Try to roll with it, or, if you’re falling backward, try to land on your bottom. Also, try not to catch your full weight with your arms or hands, as that can lead to broken arms or wrists. If you do slip and fall this winter, it’s important to address your injury. It’s better to seek out medical attention than ignore the problem, which can only get worse the longer you put it off.

ONE STEP AT A TIME

It’s important to move cautiously when you’re on an icy sidewalk. Make sure to keep your feet flat while you’re walking and your hands out of your pockets, which will help

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How One Man Rescued Hundreds of Animals HURRICANE HERO TONY ALSUP In the wake of destruction, it’s easy to focus on self-preservation. After all, fight-or-flight instincts are hard-wired into our brains so that we can survive dangerous situations. But while fear drives the actions of many in times of chaos, there are a few who find greater strength in compassion. Tony Alsup considered the potential devastation of Hurricane Florence as he sat comfortably in his home in Greeneville, Tennessee. Rather than sit back and watch, the truck driver by trade packed up an out- of-commission school bus he’d bought and set off to South Carolina with one goal in mind: to save as many animals as possible. Stopping by every shelter he found along the coast, Alsup rescued over 60 cats and dogs in both North and South Carolina and took them to Foley, Alabama. The heroic efforts of Alsup saved the lives of many animals, but it wasn’t the first time he’d rushed into danger for a good cause. He’d originally purchased the school bus, which he turned into Noah’s Ark last year, to save animals in Texas and Florida as Hurricane Harvey pounded the Gulf Coast. When he finished there, his mission shifted to helping animals in Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria ravaged the island.

It’s said that character is defined by the way someone acts when no one is watching. Many people heard of Alsup’s bravery after the devastation of Florence, but as news stories turned to sports, politics, and business, America slowly moved on. Victims of the hurricane who lacked supplies received less national attention, but more than a month later, Alsup’s commitment to the cause was as strong as ever. Living out of the back of the bus for weeks, he drove pets out of the persistent flooding and convoyed shipments of desperately needed supplies to the coastal Carolina towns. You can follow Tony’s commitment on Facebook. He’s not asking for money or fame; he’s just a person with heart to serve, using social media to promote awareness about those who desperately need our help. If you’re wondering what drives such a person, you can find it written at the bottom of every update he posts: “Love y’all, mean it.”

BUTTERY ROASTED CHESTNUTS

Ingredients

2 pounds fresh chestnuts, unpeeled

2 teaspoons kosher salt, or more to taste Pinch of freshly ground nutmeg

2–3 sprigs rosemary

1/2 cup unsalted butter, melted

Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Directions

1. Heat oven to 450 F. 2. Place a large sheet of foil on a rimmed baking sheet. 3. On a large, flat workspace, place chestnuts flat side down. Using a sharp knife, carve an X on the rounded side of each chestnut. 4. In a large bowl of hot water, soak chestnuts for 1 minute. 5. Pat dry and transfer to a medium bowl. Add rosemary,

butter, salt, pepper, and nutmeg. Toss to coat and transfer to baking sheet. Arrange in a single layer. Gather the edges of the foil together, leaving an opening at the top. 6. Roast until peels curl up, about 30–45 minutes. 7. Transfer to a platter and serve while hot or warm.

Inspired by Bon Appétit Magazine

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE From the Desk of Marc Lopez PAGE 1 Remembering Pearl Harbor PAGE 1 How to Slip and Fall the Right Way PAGE 2 Hurricane Pet Hero PAGE 3 Buttery Roasted Chestnuts PAGE 3 Holiday Decoration Tours PAGE 4

CHRISTMAS TOURS

Get Away and Be Festive This Holiday There’s nothing quite like the magical lights of the holiday season, and some destinations in the U.S. have perfected the craft of holiday decoration. If you’re looking to get away this December and still engage in seasonal festivities, add one of these places to your must-visit list.

NEW YORK CITY’S ROCKEFELLER CENTER New York City is an iconic location for

arches, but around the holidays, they are lit up with white string lights and flanked by snow. The Christmas decorations and lights surrounding the archway make for a Western- themed holiday pulled right out of a John Wayne classic. For holiday admirers looking for a unique spin, Jackson has you covered. This one’s for the Christmas lover. If you can’t make it out to Santa Claus, Indiana, this holiday season, you can still celebrate Christmas in this tiny Midwestern town in January, June, or even October. Embracing its unique name, the town boasts a museum, holiday shopping center, and a Christmas theme park. In a moving tribute, the town’s YEARLY YULETIDE IN SANTA CLAUS, INDIANA

Christmastime. The scene is like a Hallmark card: Ice-skating lovers whiz past miles of twinkling lights underneath an exceptionally tall and amply-decorated tree. The tree is specially selected by Rockefeller Center’s landscaping crews, who scout out trees years in advance. It remains lit from November to early January, so you have plenty of time to check it out.

residents also write responses to children’s letters to Kris Kringle himself. It’s impossible to avoid holiday cheer in this town.

DISNEY WORLD’S CHRISTMAS MAGIC

What better place to celebrate the most magical time of the year than in the most magical place on Earth? Walt Disney World’s halls are decked to the max with a parade, gingerbread homes, strings of lights, and festive parties. Plus, costs to visit Disney World can be cheaper during the Christmas season, so keep an eye out for a vacation steal.

RANCH CHRISTMAS IN JACKSON, WYOMING

Jackson, Wyoming, takes its frontier culture to the next level during the Christmas season. All year, the city proudly displays four elk antler

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