Emery Law Office August 2018

AUG 2018

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AUTO ACCIDENT ATTORNEYS MAKE AWFUL DRIVING INSTRUCTORS L earning to drive is one of those rites of passage that marks the journey to adulthood. Getting a freshly printed license is something that teens across the country look forward to, but before they take the test, they need to learn how to drive. Most people’s memories of their first experiences behind the wheel involve putting around, doing an endless amount of three-point turns, and trying to perfect parallel parking. In between this routine practice, however, you’ll often experience a misadventure as a new driver. That was certainly the case for my dad when he took the initiative to teach me how to drive. Luckily, my mishap didn’t involve any other drivers or property damage; it was just a scary moment for me, my dad, and our 1980 Honda Civic hatchback.

you might suspect, that makes me a stickler for safe driving techniques and a nervous Nellie when I’m in the car with young drivers. Nevertheless, I gave it a go with my eldest daughter, Katie. It only took one bad trip for me to swear off teaching driving forever. Katie was driving from her school to our house, which was at most a mile away. Somehow in that short jaunt, she

managed to hit a stop sign on the driver’s side of her car! It was in that moment that I thought to myself, “You know what, I think teaching the kids how to drive will be a great bonding experience ... for the stepparents and in-laws.” I’ve never put on my driving instructor hat since, and Katie now goes to St. John’s University in New York City, where cars are more of a nuisance than a convenience. I’m sure the stop signs of Queens are thankful. All kidding aside, learning to drive can be a rewarding experience, provided you go about it the right way. The habits you learn in drivers’ ed will be those you take onto the road, so it’s important to instill good habits early on. If you have a driver turning the ignition for the first time this summer, be sure to give them the education

First, I’ll provide a little background. When I was growing up in St. Louis, Lambert International Airport was expanding its size and scope. Both of my parents worked in the aerospace industry for McDonnell Douglas, so we lived very close to Lambert. Conveniently, right as I was ready to get behind the wheel, there were loads of empty streets by our house, which were being cleared for airport development. My first driving experiences took place on these streets, and my first scary moment as a driver.

“As challenging as learning to

drive can be, I have to admit that I found it much easier to be the student than the teacher.”

I was idling on the side of the road and forgot to switch the car from drive to reverse, or maybe it was vice versa. Whatever the case, I took off in the wrong direction. Just before we ended up in a roadside ditch, my dad pulled the emergency brake, saving us a world of hassle. “That’s why you learn to drive using a car that has the e-brake in the middle,” he said with a laugh. As challenging as learning to drive can be, I have to admit that I found it much easier to be the student than the teacher. When my kids were old enough to begin driving, I had been a practicing auto accident attorney for years. As

and tools to stay safe on the roads.

P.S. My youngest, Zachary, will be learning to drive this summer, so it might a good idea to drive slowly if you happen to be in Shelbyville during the coming months. -Melissa Emery

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3 WAYS TO MENTALLY PREPARE YOUR KIDS FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR

opportunity to help them prepare a study schedule. Ask the following questions to help them get started: “Do you want to dive right into homework when you get home? Do you need to accommodate for a sport or extracurricular activity? Do you work best when doing your assignments in one large chunk, or would you prefer taking breaks in between assignments?” Your kids may find that last year’s schedule doesn’t work for them this year. Emphasize that this is okay; part of growing up is learning how and when you work most effectively. Don’t be afraid to help them switch things up as the school year progresses.

It may not feel like it yet, but summer is coming to a close, and summer break is ending along with it. Soon, the kids will be back to early-morning breakfasts before the school bus arrives and late-night study sessions. Thankfully, there are some steps your family can take during these closing weeks of summer to ensure your kids hit the ground running this school year.

SET AN EARLY BEDTIME

For many kids, summer schedules are flexible. They may have become accustomed to sleeping in and staying up late without any obligations. Getting back into the rhythm of the school year can take some getting used to. In fact, according to psychologist Cherie Valeithian, it can take upward of two weeks to properly adjust to a new sleep-wake cycle. So why not give your kids a head start and ensure they begin the school year bright-eyed and bushy-tailed?

ASK YOUR KIDS HOW THEY FEEL

Maybe your kids are excited about the school year. Maybe they are anxious, or perhaps they’re just disappointed to see summer vacation come to an end. Starting a dialogue about the aspects of school your kids are looking forward to and those they’re dreading can help you dispel myths and identify problem areas. More than anything else, this can help your kids feel at ease about the coming year.

OUTLINE A HOMEWORK SCHEDULE

Resuming a homework regimen can be a difficult transition for some kids. Late summer, when they don’t have assignments to worry about yet, can be a great

IS YOUR CHILD READY TO DRIVE TO COLLEGE? TIPS FOR CAR AND DRIVER PREPAREDNESS

PACK SAFETY SUPPLIES

This fall, my eldest son, John Bozell, will pack up his car and head off to his first semester at the University of Kentucky. I’m not really worried about John acclimating to college life, as he’s always been a diligent student and made friends easily. My main concern is making sure he makes the drive to college safely and doesn’t have any car trouble while in Lexington — worries of an auto accident attorney, right? To give me as much peace of mind as possible, we’ll be taking every step to ensure that both car and driver are ready for their journey. If you have a child heading off to school and bringing along their vehicle, don’t skip these three important steps before you send them off.

In addition to plenty of ramen noodles, your student shouldn’t take off without some safety essentials in their trunk. Put jumper cables, reflector triangles, a car jack, a first-aid kit, and a snow brush on your supply list. Ideally, your child will never have to use these items, but in the event they do, it will be a huge help to have them on hand. You could also consider signing them up for AAA membership or another roadside assistance service.

HAVE DOCUMENTS IN ORDER

Any documentation related to the vehicle should also be up-to-date and in the glovebox. Do a thorough check of all documents, from registration to insurance papers, to ensure that nothing gets missed.

GET A THOROUGH TUNE-UP

No car should begin a journey to campus without a stop at the mechanic. Many auto shops even offer back-to-school tune-up promotions. Instruct your mechanic to check fluid levels, tire pressure, wiper blades, brakes, seatbelts, and lights. If possible, it’s also a good idea to have the vehicle undergo an inspection. That way, your student won’t have to worry about heading to the DMV between classes.

If you’d like a complementary document holder to send off to college with your loved one, call Emery Law Office at (502) 771-1LAW (1529) today.

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HAVE A LAUGH!

DEFENSIVE, DISTRACTION- FREE BEHAVIORS While we don’t think of cars as deadly weapons, there’s no denying that automobiles are extremely dangerous. Think about it. A car is a multi-thousand-pound object capable of traveling in excess of 80 mph. For parents of young drivers, teaching your children the responsibility that comes with operating a vehicle is crucial. Chief among these responsibilities are to stay alert while behind the wheel and to drive defensively. The dangers of distracted driving should be made crystal clear to young drivers. While the term has gained popularity to discuss the dangers of using phones while driving, that’s not the only distraction facing those on the road. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) defines distracted driving as “any activity that diverts attention from driving, including talking or texting on your phone, eating and drinking, talking to people in your vehicle, fiddling with the stereo, entertainment, or navigation system — anything that takes your attention away from the task of safe driving.” Research conducted by AAA found that roughly 60 percent of all accidents involving teens happened as a result of distracted driving. It only takes a moment of distraction to cause an accident, so you need to tell your teens that those text messages and Facebook posts can wait. “Keep your eyes on the road,” may be cliche advice, but it’s invaluable. Driving requires constant vigilance. When your child is behind the wheel, their only focus should be safely and lawfully arriving at their destination. Your teen should also be mindful that other drivers may also be distracted on the road. Teaching defensive driving tactics will allow them to react to the actions of other drivers. They should leave space between themselves and other vehicles, and never assume that they know how another vehicle will behave. Leaving a few extra seconds of reaction time can be the difference between a near miss and a serious wreck. Driving may be something we do every day, but that doesn’t mean it should be taken lightly. A thorough grasp of the dangers of distracted driving will provide your child with all the rationale they need to drive with complete attention on the task at hand. TEACH YOUR TEEN SAFE DRIVING HABITS

GREEN BEAN AND SESAME SALAD

INGREDIENTS

• 3 cups green beans, ends trimmed • 1 teaspoon white wine vinegar

• 1 tablespoon olive oil • 2 tablespoons sesame seeds, toasted • 1 small red onion, finely chopped

• Small bunch of fresh mint • Small bunch of flat-leaf parsley • Salt and pepper, to taste

DIRECTIONS

Inspired by Delicious magazine. WE WANT YOU TO THINK OF US AS YOUR LAW FIRM. If you have a legal matter that needs attention, let us know. If we can’t handle the matter, we will refer you to a firm that can. Please feel free to refer us to your friends and family for their legal needs. We welcome the opportunity to help. 1. Bring a large saucepan of water to boil; cook green beans for 4–5 minutes; drain well. 2. In a blender, mix finely chopped mint and parsley with olive oil, vinegar, salt, and pepper. Blend until combined. 3. Add dressing, onion, and sesame seeds to beans. Toss together. Cool dish, then refrigerate until ready to serve.

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LESSONS FROM DRIVERS’ ED 1 INSIDE

HOW TO PREPARE YOUR KIDS FOR SCHOOL GET YOUR TEEN’S CAR COLLEGE READY 2

THOSE TEXTS CAN WAIT GREEN BEAN AND SESAME SALAD 3

THE STRANGEST HOLIDAYS IN AUGUST 4

ARE THESE ON YOUR CALENDAR? AUGUST’S SILLIEST HOLIDAYS

F ebruary has Valentine’s Day; September has Labor Day; December, of course, has Christmas; and August has, um, National Raspberry Cream Pie Day. August may not host any major holidays, but it doesn’t lack for some of the goofiest on the calendar. AUGUST 6: NATIONAL WIGGLE YOUR TOES DAY While the origin of this holiday is uncertain, it’s held every year on August 6. To celebrate, people are encouraged to wear sandals, flip flops, or other toe- exposing footwear. You can also frolic barefoot in the grass or simply stretch those

digits throughout the day. Just don’t expect to see any Hallmark cards devoted to National Wiggle Your Toes Day anytime soon.

AUGUST 13: LEFT-HANDERS DAY About 10 percent of the population is left-handed. Lefties may be stuck in a right-hand-dominant world, but on August 13, they rule the roost. Originally founded in England, Left-Handers Day has taken off in the U.S. Righties are encouraged to try out a left-handed approach for the day. Lefties, for their part, are free to be themselves. AUGUST 17: NATIONAL THRIFT SHOP DAY Thrift shops are a staple of American commerce, so it makes sense that there is a day devoted to them. Take the day to hunt for lost treasures and screaming deals. Many thrift shops also benefit nonprofit organizations, giving you even more reason to frequent them. AUGUST 27: NATIONAL ‘JUST BECAUSE’ DAY This celebration is really scratching the bottom of the holiday barrel. Joseph J. Goodwin created National “Just Because” Day in the 1950s. It’s a day to do something “just because.” Be spontaneous and have a little fun. There’s no one way to celebrate, which is fitting, given that the existence of the holiday seems to defy logic altogether.

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