Heights - River Oaks - Montrose Edition | March 2020

HEIGHTS RIVEROAKS MONTROSE EDITION

VOLUME 1, ISSUE 12  MARCH 4APRIL 7, 2020

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IMPACTS

LOCAL CAMPS

BUSINESS FEATURE

DINING FEATURE

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Just weeks after an apparent accidental shooting killed one Houston ISD student, a report of a threat paralyzed students at Heights High School. Students exchanged worried messages, rumors cir- culated and parents began to get involved. “Within a span of three hours one third of my class- mates had gone home because they thought they were no longer safe on campus,” said Emily Ramirez, a senior at Heights High School. She recounted the episode, which turned out to be a false alarm, in testimony to Houston City Council’s Public Safety Committee on Feb. 5, joined by her peers at Bellaire High School in asking for more attention to the root causes of school shootings. District trustees and ocials have been grappling CONTINUED ON 20 Houston ISDgrappleswith complex issue of safety BY MATT DULIN

3,9383 homeless people were counted in Harris, Montgomery and Fort Bend counties in 2019.

A Troubling trend

BY EMMA WHALEN HousingHouston's homeless As Mayor Turner sets sights on new fundraising goals, experts worry about at-risk population An annual three-day tally of the Houston area’s homeless population, known as the point-in-time count, shows an over 50% decrease since 2011. City and nonprot leaders, however, worry that the number of people at risk of falling into home- lessness—like Perez was beginning at age 14— could begin to outpace those who nd permanent housing. SEARCH outreach specialist Otha Norton, left, assists Carlton Ray and records data in a multi-agency information system.

National statistics have tracked a spike in shootings and fatalities at K-12 schools, with shootings more than doubling from 2017 to 2018. Another 16 incidents were reported in January 2020.

Shooting incidents

Active shooter incidents

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80 60 40 20 0 '10 '11 '12 '13 '14 '15 '16 '17 '18 '19 5

When Brittany Perez was living out of her car, at times the best place to sleepwas anywhere she could nd a gate. “You can’t go to a park because they close at night so sometimes I would go to an apartment complex and stay inmy car there because at least I knew I was safe,” she said.

By the end of the year, Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner is committed to seeing a 10% reduction in the city’s homeless population. To boost chances of success, Turner is soliciting $50million in dona- tions for The Way Home, the coordinating body of

SOURCE: CENTER FOR DEFENSE AND HOMELAND SECURITY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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communityimpact.com

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