Law Office of Elliott Kanter APC - December 2018

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December 2018

SKIING, HOLIDAYS, AND HAMBURGERS ON CHANGING SEASONS AND TRADITIONS

In past editions of this newsletter, I’ve talked about some of my memories from growing up on the East Coast, especially concerning my nostalgia for holidays like the Fourth of July and Thanksgiving. But if there’s one thing I don’t miss about my Pennsylvanian homeland, it’s the snow. It can keep its “winter wonderlands” and “one-horse open sleighs” — I’ll take sunshine and palm trees any day of the week. Of course, this wasn’t always my attitude. Believe it or not, I used to be quite the avid skier. The first time I went up as a young man, I didn’t think I’d ever do it again. I made the mistake of trying night skiing first, and the iced snow may as well have been concrete. I’ve never been more sore than I was after that night of slipping, sliding, and crashing down the mountain. Fortunately, some friends in law school brought me back into the sport. But really, it was moving out west that solidified my love of skiing. From the winding Alpine runs at Steamboat to the powdery heights of Sun Valley, my wife and I have explored a lot of the amazing skiing this part of the country has to offer. In fact, we started researching where we wanted to go next as early as October! Part of me misses those days, but after our daughters were born, having a warm, relaxing holiday season became more important. In our household, we celebrate Hanukkah and Christmas. It was important to my wife and me that we raise our kids to have, above all else,

good morals and a respect for their shared heritage. Lighting the menorah and decorating our tree (some years at the same time) became our own Kanter family tradition. I preferred to take on the role of Santa Claus to my old December role of “The Hamburger King.” Not to be confused with any fast-food royalty, “The Hamburger King” is the title my siblings gave me when I was old enough to cook dinner during the holiday rush. You see, my father ran a clothing store, so between Thanksgiving and

hands were on deck. Our whole family would work well into the night, taking care of all those last-minute holiday shoppers in an era before Amazon and same-day shipping. We then, as a family, would celebrate the store closing by going out to dinner. While it was a different sort of experience from the holiday classics you may be familiar with, I’m certainly grateful for those hectic, hamburger-filled holidays. By the time I went to college, I had an easier time adjusting to the independence than a lot of my peers. It was important to me to pass on this same sense of independence to my daughters as they grew up. Now that they’re both grown and pursuing their dreams in LA and New York, I couldn’t be more proud. One thing hasn’t changed though; they love spending the holidays back here at home in sunny San Diego.

WHILE IT WAS A DIFFERENT SORT OF EXPERIENCE FROM THE HOLIDAY CLASSICS YOU MAY BE FAMILIAR WITH, I’M CERTAINLY GRATEFUL FOR THOSE HECTIC, HAMBURGER-FILLED HOLIDAYS.

Christmas, he’d keep the shop open until 9 p.m from the day after Thanksgiving until Christmas Eve. During the holiday break from school, my siblings and I also helped out in the store. In the week or so leading up to Christmas, my mother (a teacher) would moonlight as a store clerk as well, providing a crucial extra hand. As the eldest, I was in charge of feeding the troops at home. My siblings didn’t complain. After all, I made a darn good burger.

So from all of us Kanters, happy holidays, and have a fantastic new year!

By the time we were old enough to stock shelves and fold clothes, Christmas Eve meant that all

-Elliott Kanter

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Law Office of Elliott Kanter APC | (619) 231-1883

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4 WINTER ILLNESSES YOU’D RATHER AVOID KNOW WHAT TO LOOK FOR BEFORE THEY ATTACK

Achoo! That’s the last noise you want to hear this winter. Cold weather brings a slew of sicknesses, so be vigilant to treat these common illnesses, or better yet, avoid them altogether. THE COMMON COLD Although there is no cure, a cold is easier to treat than other illnesses. If you or a loved one has a runny nose, low-grade fever, headache, cough, nasal congestion, or sore throat, the common cold has most likely taken hold. With the help of rest and perhaps some cold medicine, like cough drops and decongestants, the cold will come and go in about a week.

and is caused by other viruses. Of the many symptoms — nasal congestion, low-grade fevers, and coughing — wheezing is the one you should be most concerned about. If your child is having difficulty breathing and is dehydrated, they may have caught a more serious strain of the virus. Most children will recover with at-home rest, but some may need to be hospitalized for more severe symptoms. INFLUENZA The flu is known for causing high fever, muscle aches and pains, nausea, and other symptoms similar to a cold. Often, the fever will last for around five days, but it can be shortened with the aid of antiviral medications. However, these medications are recommended only for children who face serious complications or hospitalization

from the flu. If you want to avoid catching this, your best bet is to receive the annual flu vaccine. STREP THROAT A sore throat, headache, stomach ache, vomiting, and high fever are signs of strep. This infection is treated with antibiotics and should be addressed soon after the first symptoms appear to prevent further complications. Children with strep throat should stay away from school and other activities until they’ve been on antibiotics for 24 hours. Everyone knows that getting sick is no fun and is best avoided at all costs. However, it happens to everyone eventually. Catching a virus or infection in its early stages can help you shake the sickness much faster.

BRONCHIOLITIS Bronchiolitis appears most commonly in children less than a year old

HURT ON THE HOLIDAYS WAYS TO SUPPORT SOMEONE THROUGH THE SEASON In the past, we’ve covered ways you can support friends or loved ones after an auto accident. This month, we’d like to share some advice on what you can do to make the holidays a little easier for a friend or loved one recovering from a traumatic event. After all, the season brings its own unique challenges, but it can also be turned into an opportunity to bring comfort and joy to someone during an otherwise difficult time. BRING HOME TO THEM If your friend was involved in a particularly bad accident, they might be hospitalized. While there is never a good time of year to be in the hospital, the sentiment that one should be “home for the holidays” can weigh heavy on survivors’ minds. So why not bring home to them? Colored lights, menorahs, and small (artificial) Christmas trees can all bring a sense of familiarity and normalcy to your friend when they need it most. Just be sure to check with your friend and the hospital staff before decorating. MOVIE NIGHT Whether your friend is in the hospital or at home, physical activities will most likely be a challenge for them. Whiplash, concussions, and other injuries common in car crashes can make moving around difficult or even painful. So why not settle in with a seasonal classic, like “Miracle on 34th Street” or “Die Hard?”

SURROGATE SHOPPING Between the physical and financial burdens of an accident, shopping for gifts this time of year can be extremely difficult. Volunteering to help with their list, whether it means buying the gifts or just doing the actual footwork, can lift a huge burden off of your friend’s shoulders, especially if they have children. BE THERE This all ultimately boils down to being there for your friend during this difficult time. While you’re decorating, watching movies, or going over their shopping list, ask them how they are doing. Listen, and be an empathetic presence for them. The greatest gift you can give this holiday season may be a warm smile or a shoulder to cry on.

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MORE THAN A SLAP ON THE WRIST

Last month, we covered the tragic reality that accidents involving alcohol skyrocket nationwide during Thanksgiving weekend. Unfortunately, the incidence of DUI-related accidents stays higher than average throughout the holiday season, reaching a fever pitch on Christmas and New Year’s Eve. As much as this time of year should be about merrymaking, please, please, please do so responsibly. The costs of getting behind the wheel drunk are simply too high. FINANCIAL COST Even a DUI conviction without an accident or property damage can carry a hefty price tag beyond the legal fines. When you are charged with a DUI, you will be arrested on the spot, meaning the state will charge you the cost of towing and impounding your vehicle. If convicted, you’ll also have to pay for court-ordered DUI courses and to have your license reinstated. But the most expensive consequence to your bank account will be the increase to your insurance premium. According to DMV.org, premium increases after a DUI conviction can last as long as 13 years, carrying the financial toll of the incident well into the future. With all these factors combined, the San Diego- based site estimates that a first-time DUI conviction in California could wind up costing you upward of $45,000. Again, this is without property damage or bodily injuries involved. EMOTIONAL COST Unfortunately, the “best-case scenario” where no one is harmed is not the norm when it comes to DUIs. According to the CDC, 31 percent of car accident deaths in the U.S. involve an alcohol-impaired driver. Even when they aren’t fatal, these kinds of accidents can cause life-altering injuries. Whether a drunk driver sustains these injuries themselves or is liable for causing them to another, the reality is that they will be living with the emotional costs of their decision for the rest of their life. As a law firm that deals both in personal injury and criminal defense, we’ve seen the pain that drunk drivers and the bystanders hurt by their actions have to live through. One mistake can leave a lasting impact on entire families. Take it from us; a little inconvenience and the cost of ridesharing are far better than what a DUI might cost you. Let’s all do our part to make the holidays a little safer for everyone.

BUTTERY ROASTED CHESTNUTS Inspired by Bon Appétit

Whether or not you have an open fire, you can easily roast some chestnuts using this simple, delicious recipe.

INGREDIENTS

• • •

2 pounds fresh chestnuts, unpeeled

2 teaspoons kosher salt, or more to taste

2–3 sprigs rosemary

1/2 cup unsalted butter, melted

• •

Pinch of freshly ground nutmeg Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

DIRECTIONS

1. Heat oven to 450 F. 2. Place a large sheet of foil on a rimmed baking sheet. 3. On a large, flat workspace, place chestnuts flat side down. Using a sharp knife, carve an X on the rounded side of each chestnut. 4. In a large bowl of hot water, soak chestnuts for 1 minute. 5. Pat dry and transfer to a medium bowl. Add rosemary, butter, salt, pepper, and nutmeg. Toss to coat and transfer to baking sheet. Arrange in a single layer. Gather the edges of the foil together, leaving an opening at the top.

6. Roast until peels curl up, about 30–45 minutes. 7. Transfer to a platter and serve while hot or warm.

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Law Office of Elliott Kanter APC | (619) 231-1883

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Law Office of Elliott Kanter APC 2445 Fifth Ave #350 San Diego, CA 92101 (619) 231-1883

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

HAPPY HOLIDAYS FROM THE KANTERS!

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WHAT DO MY SYMPTOMS MEAN?

HOSPITALIZED ON THE HOLIDAYS: WHAT YOU CAN DO TO HELP

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BUTTERY ROASTED CHESTNUTS

THE REAL COST OF A DUI

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HOLIDAY DECORATION TOURS

CHRISTMAS TOURS

in advance. It remains lit from November to early January, so you have plenty of time to check it out. RANCH CHRISTMAS IN JACKSON, WYOMING Jackson, Wyoming, takes its frontier culture to the next level during the Christmas season. All year, the city proudly displays four elk antler arches, but around the holidays, they are lit up with white string lights and flanked by snow. The Christmas decorations and lights surrounding the archway make for a Western- themed holiday pulled right out of a John Wayne classic. For holiday admirers looking for a unique spin, Jackson has you covered. YEARLY YULETIDE IN SANTA CLAUS, INDIANA This one’s for the Christmas lover. If you can’t make it out to Santa Claus, Indiana, this holiday season, you can still celebrate Christmas in

this tiny Midwestern town in January, June, or even October. Embracing its unique name, the town boasts a museum, holiday shopping center, and a Christmas theme park. In a moving tribute, the town’s residents also write responses to children’s letters to Kris Kringle himself. It’s impossible to avoid holiday cheer in this town. DISNEY WORLD’S CHRISTMAS MAGIC What better place to celebrate the most magical time of the year than in the most magical place on Earth? Walt Disney World’s halls are decked to the max with a parade, gingerbread homes, strings of lights, and festive parties. Plus, costs to visit Disney World can be cheaper during the Christmas season, so keep an eye out for a vacation steal.

GET AWAY AND BE FESTIVE THIS HOLIDAY SEASON

There’s nothing quite like the magical lights of the holiday season. If you’re looking to get away this December and still engage in seasonal festivities, add one of these places to your must-visit list. NEW YORK CITY’S ROCKEFELLER CENTER New York City is an iconic location for Christmastime. The scene is like a Hallmark card: Ice-skating lovers whiz past miles of twinkling lights underneath an exceptionally tall and amply decorated tree. The tree is specially selected by Rockefeller Center’s landscaping crews, who scout out trees years

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