Bridge Firm Recovery May 2019

Recovery Reader The May 2019

www.bridgefirmrecovery.com (269) 359-0814

3 SIGNS IT’S TIME TO FIRE AN EMPLOYEE

FROM THE DESK OF Dan

APRIL SHOWERS BRING MAY FLOWERS!

We have all probably heard that phrase at one point or another in our lives. Well, being a landlord is supposed to be just like that, per the 3 a.m. shows and these workshops that keep coming to town.

The reality is, it can! But not by the power of Mother Nature.

In order for your investments (May flowers) to bloom, you need to shower themwith the right kind of attention. What do I mean by that? Glad you asked: Do you have a solid application in place; one that asks all the questions, and the right ones? Do you know your risk tolerance and have a qualification standard in place? Do you know what to do when/if your tenant gets behind on payments? Do you know when it’s time to help that tenant move on? If you answered NO to any of these questions, we need to talk. Together, we can add the proper fertilizer (the answers) to those showers, and you will see your investments bloom. Do you have a quality lease?

Some Bad Behaviors Are Hard to Detect

Sometimes it’s easy to tell when it’s time to let someone go. When an employee is consistently late, refuses to deliver on their promises, or establishes a pattern of blatant toxicity, it’s obvious that you should send them packing. Unfortunately, sometimes the worst employees in your organization are the ones coasting by behind the scenes, covering up their mistakes and undermining your workplace culture without you realizing it. Here are three less obvious tendencies of bad employees.

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THEY’RE EAGER TO THROWTHEIR COWORKERS UNDER THE BUS.

In business, errors are bound to be made — sometimes even catastrophic ones. But when your employee immediately rushes to point the finger at another individual — even one who is partly culpable — it’s a red flag. Any employee who genuinely enjoys working in your organization will form connections to their coworkers. If they’re quick to throw others under the bus instead of taking some responsibility, it shows that they do not value trust or community — or they simply care more about their own well-being than the well-being of the company. While it’s not ideal for an employee to take responsibility for an error that truly wasn’t their fault, acknowledging that they may have had a hand in the error — whether it was miscommunication or mismanagement — shows a level of self-awareness and strength that can go a long way in business.

Spring is finally here! We are looking forward to a great summer season.

Have a great month!

Dan Larson

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