PMI Newsletter JUNE_singles

PROJECT MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE - UK CHAPTER

PRIDE, PASSION, AND PERSPECTIVE WOMEN IN PROJECT MANAGEMENT

JUNE ISSUE LEADER

UK Chapter News

Who’s who?

Welcome

Insight

Through this news round-up, we look to highlight innovative and emerging news, regulation, and research, as well as including experts from the PMI UK Chapter exploring new ideas, technologies, and best practices within project management during these unprecedented times. In this addition, we have a full list of all events happening, as well as an introduction to the thought leadership series and of course being a special month, we are also celebrating Pride Month. As ever, please stay healthy and should you have any questions, then feel free to get in touch with anyone of the PMI team. I hope to bring more good news in next month’s newsletter. Should you have any comments or suggestions, please feel free to contact me. Happy reading. Navjot Editor’s welcome:

Navjot Singh, Newsletter Editor

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UK Chapter News Pride, Passion, and Perspective In celebration of June being Pride Month, we are reminded to celebrate being your authentic self, and that everyone has their voice, their perspective, and their experience. More importantly, that the world needs every voice and talent, as we work toward creating sustainable cultural change. The business case and the human case for support Pride, diversity and inclusion has never been stronger, so now is the time for organisational leaders to invest in creating and sustaining a culture of inclusion. Pride Month provides us with the inspiration to do just that. Leaders who invite, celebrate, and create a safe, trusting space for storytelling build an inclusive culture faster and more effectively than those who do not. At the Project Management Institute (PMI), we believe strongly in creating a sense of belonging, connection, and community, and in raising awareness and understanding of our differences, so that our workplace is one where colleagues stand with and for each other.

In 2021, PMI’s former President and CEO, Sunil Prashara, issued a statement to the PMI community driving home our pledge to honoring Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DE&I) within the project management profession. You can read the pledge here.

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UK Chapter News

This year PMI globally launched the social good initiative in support of DE&I. The initiative’s mission is to ensure that PMI continues to maintain a global culture that recognises the contributions and interests of our diverse stakeholders, including our employees, organisation members, volunteers, certification holders, and all members of the global project management community. PMI value our differences by building on our diverse backgrounds and perspectives to support a positive environment, promote personal and professional development, empower all people to reach their full potential, and advance and advocate for the project management profession globally.

We encourage you to actively participate in conversations, volunteer work and activism that will help contribute to lasting societal change. You can read more about it here:

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UK Chapter News The PMI UK chapter is committed to modelling diversity, equity, and inclusion for the project management industry, and supporting an inclusive environment with equal treatment for all. We encourage by our actions a diverse, inclusive, and fair chapter where all members and volunteers, whatever their gender, race, religion, ethnicity, national origin, age, orientation or identity, education, or development support needs, feel valued and respected. We are committed to a non-discriminatory approach and provide equal opportunity for involvement in all our committees, programs, and volunteer-based initiatives. We respect and value diverse life experiences and heritages and ensure that all voices are valued and heard. Pride Month is a time to remember the obstacles that the diverse community has overcome, and a time to celebrate the achievements of the brave members of the community who have continued to fight for equity and dignity. PMI UK is proud to support our community of diverse project managers, leaders and changemakers. We must all work together to build a more fair and just society – a reflection of PMI’s purpose. Together, we will continue to be One Team. One Song. One Dance. One PMI.

Gerhard Nel, PMP

About the Author:

Gerhard is a PMP certified project manager with 15 years’ experience leading cross-functional business and technical teams, managing multi-year IT programs within the fin-tech industry across the UK, Europe, and US.

LinkedIn

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UK Chapter News WIP Mentors & Champions The Women in Projects PMI UK Chapter is on an exciting journey and we are looking for keen volunteers to get involved. Plans are in place to start a mentoring scheme that ensures there is a shift in the gender imbalance. We would like to support women thrive in the Project Management profession and provide tools as well as practical experience to boost personal development and learning.

Mentors: are you passionate about supporting, encouraging and drawing out the best in others? Do you have the time to engage with our mentoring scheme to see others gain the necessary skills and practical experience they need to reach their potential? Champions: we need more people to speak up for the Women in Projects community. Are you interested?

If yes to any of the above, then we would like to hear from you! Contact us at service@pmi.org.uk and let’s jump into action, together.

Insight from our contributors Women in project management Science says that project management, leadership, and contemporary workplace all are a good fit for women. However;, there are still some obstacles to overcome, you might be surprised by some of the facts. Whether we want to believe it or not, men and women have always been viewed as two different sets of people. And of course, there are stereotypes that go with the sets. Women are supposed to like pink, and men blue. Women are supposed to take care of the children, men are supposed to bring home the bacon. Women are supposed to be emotional; men should never shed a tear. The list goes on. However, if we look past the stereotypes, we see that – in a good way – the world is a lot trickier than that. There are women who want to climb the corporate ladder. And we also have the stay-at-home dads. Something that is more prevalent over the past couple of years, and something I see as a very positive trend, is a trend where women in project management want to change the fact that it’s still an area that’s dominated by men. Data on the involvement of women in project management is sparse, to put it mildly. Statistics available from the Project Management Institute (PMI) show that women currently constitute an estimated 20 – 30 % of the project management staff worldwide.

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Insight from our contributors

“Womenomics” – the female shift in business – is a global megatrend that has too long been neglected. Japanese prime minister Shinzo Abe addressed this phenomenon in 2013 by declaring his intention to focus more strongly on theJapanese leadership’s stated goal of making equality for women the centrepiece of Japan’s economic and growth strategy. His stated goal at the time was to have women occupy 30% of the managerial positions. Additionally, the workforce participation rate for women aged 25 – 44 was to be increased from 68% to 73% by 2020.

Workforce participation rate for women

73% By 2020

The goal: To tap the latent reserves of the female labour force as a production factor to boost economic performance and development.

Maximising the economic potential was not the only goal, however. Workplace equality, and especially career opportunities, are not only an economic and business issue but even more so a societal one. Can a nation or a company really afford to neglect 50% of its workforce, especially one that is generally very well educated? No society can justify denying half its population equal opportunities for development. Gender diversity is no longer a niche issue. It is now part of the political and economic mainstream and become a major issue in decision-making processes. Is project management a man’s world? Gender-specific challenges (or obstacles?) have not been completely eliminated. Project management remains a man’s world. Women managers often report that they first have to assert themselves to gain acceptance and overcome the typical stereotypes. There’s also a scarcity of female role models. This is partially attributable to the fact more women than men face the challenge of achieving a good work-life balance while managing a project.

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Insight from our contributors The positive influence of women on projects and companies The employment world continues to evolve and is developing into a project-based economy. The key to gaining a competitive advantage in this brave new world of work is having highly efficient, motivated employees. This is a prerequisite for successful projects. Having qualified women in project management will therefore become increasingly important. They have already proven their worth and are therefore no longer an optional nice-to-have but rather a valuable contributor to the company’s bottom line. Greater diversity in project management It’s a well-known fact that diversity in project management – also regarding gender balance – produces better project results and serves to sustainably incorporate the project in the affected company or organisation. Women can deploy their strengths in projects by, for example, bringing people together and driving the collaboration needed to produce a shared achievement. They are skilled at finding fast, practical solutions to complex problems and can communicate well. Multiple studies have found that women are better at assessing risk and therefore can guide their actions accordingly, women tend to be better and scheduling resources and budgeting projects. Why are Women a Better Fit for PM? Men and women generally tend to lead in the same way, only women are more likely to be “transformational” leaders, serving as role models, helping employees develop their skills, and motivating them to be dedicated and creative. In addition, if we talk about workspaces, researchers have found that women reported the lowest stress levels in open-plan offices. With men strongly preferring private offices. However, 36% of men say they get most of their work done remotely, compared with just 23% of women. Numbers that have only been exacerbated by the current COVID pandemic.

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Insight from our contributors

In a series of interviews published by the Australian Institute of Project Management, six female project management professionals share their perspectives and what they see down the road for the industry and woman in project management.

“In a traditionally male dominated profession, to have your opinion heard and respected is sometimes a challenge”. Fleur Wiley MAIPM CPPD, Senior Manager at PwC with over 20 years’ experience

“My biggest struggle as a woman in PM has been building my confidence and not feeling intimidated or out of place. It can be daunting to be the only woman in a meeting or on-site.”

Jamie Jin MAIPM CPPM, Associate, Conscia Pty Ltd

“Women need to work much harder to earn respect and be heard versus men. I tend to find that we put in double of the amount of effort to prove our credibility compared to our male counterparts.”

Daniela Kellett MAIPM CPPD, Director at Achieve

“Balancing the needs of my family with the demands of professional life is an artform.”

Kestrel Stone MAIPM, Chief Executive Officer of Elemental Projects

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Insight from our contributors These women shared some great insights on how to move forward in a disrupting future. It has become very clear that we need to speed up the journey to gender equality in the workplace to the benefit of all women. With women as passionate and as talented as the ones featured here, and there are millions more to lead the charge, the project management profession can step into a rapidly changing future with creativity and adaptability. Fleur Wiley adds, “The role of PM has become more agile, and the skills more adaptable and more deployable across a business. We are more connected and teams more disparate. The role of PM now traverses multiple areas incorporating change and taking people on a journey to reach the ultimate project end point. AIPM’s Board Director Connie Beck FAIPM CPPD added, “PMs are now faced with being change managers, futurists, as well as managing accelerating projects due to budget constraints. Having solid competency-based training will help any PM ensure that they are clear about roles and responsibilities when setting up a project as more and more gets thrown at them.”

So, what are their advice then for our fellow women project management peers?

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Don’t let others define what you can and can’t do. If you want or have a family, you will be surprised just how strong you can be to meet the challenges that will come and push past the limiting attitudes others impart on themselves.

Volunteer if you can to raise your brand, apply for roles even if you are unsure you will be successful to raise your profile. Take on extra competency-based certification to assist you be recognised in your industry. Connie Beck

You are you and unique, so define your own story. Sonia Brennan

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Build relationships and connect with other female project managers who you admire and ask them about their journey to their role. Fleur Wiley

Shape the culture that you want to work in – you are more influential than you probably think and even gradual pressure in the right direction can be incredibly powerful. Seek out opportunities to be flexible. Kestrel Stone

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Insight from our contributors

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Don’t behave like a man to win respect and earn a voice. It’s not helpful in the longer term. Let’s prove to the world that being a kind, thoughtful and empathetic project management professional is just as powerful and that as a team, with a balance of both skills, we are more likely to succeed. Daniela Kellett

Always give your best at everything you do. Don’t give people a reason to doubt your skills. Remember that every moment is an opportunity for you to disprove any preconceived ideas that people have about women in construction. Jamie Jin

Project management relies on good leadership and team working which can be enhanced by promoting individual strengths. Much has been said about the potential for improvements in organisational practices to be found in examining the differences in management styles between men and women, whilst little has been done to develop organisational processes needed to realise this potential. The future relies on changes in working practices, involving both men and women.

About the Author:

Gerhard is a PMP certified project manager with 15 years’ experience leading cross-functional business and technical teams, managing multi-year IT programs within the fin-tech industry across the UK, Europe, and US.

LinkedIn

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Insight from our contributors How to Thrive in the Multi-Project Workplace Around a third of the gross domestic product (GDP) in the average Western economy is a result of project activity so it is unsurprising that organisations do so many projects. They are the way strategy gets delivered, and in what PMI calls the ‘project economy’, it’s likely that organisations will continue to deliver work through the structure of projects. However, because there are so many projects, we all often have to contribute (or lead) several at a time. That makes multi-project management an expectation in many roles, so let’s unpack that for a moment. If you are managing multiple projects, it means you have more than one project on the go at the same time. You’ll have different project teams (even if the people on them are the same people). You might have different sponsors or customers, all with their own expectations of what’s possible, and probably the belief that their project is the most important. Each project has its own timeline, and you have to manage your time to keep them all moving forward to hit the planned deadlines and milestones. This workload is different from the workload of someone managing a single project, or carrying out their day job. There are more moving parts and normally more people involved. Managing multiple projects is different from having responsibility for just leading one project. That’s not to say that leading a single project is easy: the larger the project, the more complex and strategically important it tends to be, and that comes with its own stressors.

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Insight from our contributors

What a multi-project environment looks like A multi-project environment features the following:

• A large number of unrelated stakeholders who need to be engaged in various, sometimes isolated, sometimes connected activities

• More project sponsors to please

• More expectations to meet

• Project teams made up of part-time resources who also have a day job to do that takes priority over their project work • More resource conflicts to resolve, often with subject matter experts booked to work on multiple projects who then struggle to see their whole work commitments and aren’t able to complete their tasks in the timeframe they expected • Constant pressure from deadlines instead of the comfortable ebb and flow of busy and not-so-busy points on a single project: every month one of your projects is beginning, completing or hitting some major milestone.

A workload that includes multiple projects also requires a slightly different take on the core skills that are used to manage a single project. It’s not a totally new skillset, but it’s a smarter, more complex way of addressing the work and the complexities of balancing many people, processes, and products. Every day is a balance between doing something to advance your own To Do list, and supporting your team and colleagues with their work. What should you be focused on? How do you choose what to do first? How can you use what you already know to make this easier? Those are some of the challenges of delivering multiple projects.

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Insight from our contributors Whether you have the job title of project manager or not, you could have a workload made up predominantly of projects. Perhaps the bulk of your time is spent in an operational role, with the expectation that you will manage projects around the edges of that. You may find that your project workload changes from time to time depending on what your organisation requires of you. For example, a finance manager may find themselves spending more and more time on improvement projects during the majority of the year, and then be fully focused on year end accounting when it’s time to do the books for the past 12 months.

If you’ve only recently been given a couple of projects to manage, you might be feeling OK about your workload at the moment, whatever it looks like. The default approach most people use is to replicate the same methods as you use to run a single project. Just repeat exactly what you are doing for your first project, using the same approach, tools and techniques. However, it won’t be long before you start to feel that you don’t have time to do everything to the level of quality you expect of yourself. You recognise that things aren’t going as well as they could, and you feel it should be easier to work efficiently with a multi- project workload.

Click here to read 15 Awesome Tools I Use To Manage My Projects

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Insight from our contributors

Skills for managing multiple projects To thrive in a multi-project job, you need different skills – or at least the ability to apply your project management skills in a different way. Perhaps unsurprisingly, in a survey for my book Managing Multiple Projects, planning and stakeholder engagement came out as the top skills required for people managing multiple projects, closely followed by team management. In fact, survey respondents recognised over 60 different skills, from attention to detail to vendor management.

That’s a lot to factor into every working day. While we don’t get up in the morning and say, “Today I’m going to use my attention to detail,” we cycle through a huge number of professional skills each and every hour, so the job gets done.

People are an important part of making sure multiple projects stay on track, and are delivered in an efficient way, but there is something else that will help you thrive in a multi- project environment, and that’s prioritising. Make sure you know what your top priority work commitments are. Then line up everything behind those so you have enough time and the right resources to see them through. Share your personal priorities and team priorities with your colleagues so they know what is important – and, crucially, can redirect your efforts if you’ve misunderstood something. There is the expectation that we’ll juggle more and more projects at work as organisations expect more from leaders and deliver parallel changes. However, we can step up to meet those expectations with the right skills and support.

About the Author:

Elizabeth Harrin is the author of Managing Multiple Projects and provides training, education and mentorship to project managers through her award-winning website, Rebel’s Guide to Project Management. She has over 20 years’ experience managing large IT and business change projects in financial services and healthcare. LinkedIn

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Insight from our contributors Focus on PMI Agile Certifications – Part 3 Disciplined Agile ® Value Stream Consultant (DAVSC) Certification Over the next few months, I am focusing on the different Agile certifications that PMI offers, and the approaches to training and certification via a progressive path to agile mastery. So far, I have covered the Disciplined Agile Coach (DAC) and Disciplined Agile Scum Master (DASM).

This month I would like to introduce the Disciplined Agile Value Stream Consultant (DAVSC) certification. If you want to help organisations achieve true business agility, then this certification is for you!

Do you want to accelerate value delivery at scale by moving beyond individual teams and applying Disciplined Agile across your organisation? Disciplined Agile Value Stream Consultant (DAVSC) folds practices from flow, lean, the theory of constraints, and organisational development into Disciplined Agile to give you the tools to optimise enterprise-wide value streams.

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Insight from our contributors

Reasons to attend this course:

• Learn to determine the best place for an organisation to start.

• Be equipped to tailor an organisation’s improvement plan based on their unique needs, while also attending to their culture.

• Know how to accelerate the realisation of value by your customers at scale.

• Identify the most effective practices for each situation with the help of the DA tool kit— whether it be a new Agile transition or continuing a stagnated SAFe or Spotify approach.

• Be able to train an organisation to continue to improve on their own.

Your PMI Agile Learning Journey

Experienced in Agile and needs to deal with complex situations

DAVSC Disciplined Agile Value Stream Consultant TM

Wants to lead transformations

Any team member new to agile

Gains Agile experience

DASSM Disciplined Agile Senior Scrum Master TM

DASM Disciplined Agile Scrum Master TM

DAC Disciplined Agile Coach TM

Wants to coach in DA

Gains Agile experience

Wants general agile knowledge

PMI - ACP PMI Agile certified Practitioner ©

© Project Management Institute. All rights reserved.

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Insight from our contributors

Course Outline

Make no mistake, as with any of the PMI certifications, the learning is intense over 3 days. • Value Stream Consultant: role and work • The idealised value stream • Removing delays in the workflow • The minimum business increment • The discovery workflow and the development intake process • Business increment planning and coordination • Cadence • Reducing (not accommodating) dependencies • Factors for effective value streams • Value creation structure • Agile budgeting and lean funding • Creating visibility across the organisation • Key roles • End of increment activities

Course Requirements • Three years of agile experience

• The Disciplined Agile Senior Scrum Master (DASSM) certification to ensure in-depth knowledge of the DA tool kit and the hundreds of practices and strategies it contains

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Insight from our contributors

How it Works:

• Sign up for the three-day equivalent training with one of a PMI authorised Disciplined Agile partner.

• Complete the course and attain the DAVSC Trained badge.

• Accept the invitation to the exclusive DAVSC community of practice, where you will gain additional resources and support as you start to practice the skills you learned and prepare for certification.

• After three months of membership and practice in the community, you will be eligible to register for the DAVSC exam. The DAVSC exam fee is included in the course tuition.

• Pass the exam and claim your DAVSC certified badge.

• The certification is valid for one year and can be renewed upon expiry.

The Disciplined Agile Coach (DAC) arrives with a unique toolkit, intellectual property to facilitate collaborative decision making, and expertise in Guided Continuous Improvement (GCI). Beyond just understanding coaching competencies, the DAC builds roadmaps. The DAC has a playbook ready for action on day one!

“The DAVSC certification from PMI feels like the most valuable offering since the PMP and PMBOK first captured the attention of knowledge workers around the world. It is much more than a workshop, an exam and a badge.”

Roger D. Beatty, PhD, PMP, DASSM

About the Author:

Gerhard is a PMP certified project manager with 15 years’ experience leading cross-functional business and technical teams, managing multi-year IT programs within the fin-tech industry across the UK, Europe, and US. He manages the EMEA Cleared Derivatives PMO for the ION Group, responsible for project delivery and governance, and ensuring client satisfaction.

LinkedIn

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We are planning the following events

PMI UK Webinar: Risk Management for Projects and Programs. 5 July 2022 | 12:00-1:00 pm After this one-hour session, learners will be able to:

5th July

• Demonstrate to others how the risk management processes in a guide to the project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK ® Guide) apply to your project’s environment • D ifferentiate between Project and Program Risk Management and understand how they support one another Speaker Keith is a Senior Consultant, Trainer and Coach with over 25 years of successful management and consulting experience and business planning. Keith is a leader in Agile training, coaching and transitioning to Agile. He is well known for his public speaking skills and enthusiasm and has been a welcomed facilitator at numerous fortune 500 corporations, universities, and associations worldwide. He is engaging, energetic, entertaining, and informative. Read more PMI UK Virtual Sessions: Preparing for the PMI Exam 6 July 2022 | 6:00 -8:00 pm These sessions are for anyone who is considering or even preparing for the PMI exams. The focus is on the current PMP exam content. The sessions are not an exam preparation course in itself but an overview to lay the platform for the attendee to plan their approach to study and then to pass their selected PMI exam. It is an opportunity not only to get further knowledge on the exam topics but also to ask the questions you have wanted to ask and answers that cannot be found in articles or on websites. The goal is to increase your chance of success in passing the exam by offering practical examples to help cement the concepts in place and so answer the questions with more confidence. Speaker John Moore is an Agile, Business Analysis, Project, Programme and Portfolio Management Consultant. Having started his career as a technical professional in IT functions he has the perspective of both business and IT functions of leading public and private sectors. John holds a range of credentials including PMP, PRINCE2, PraxisFramework, MSP, ITIL, BCS Business Analysis, Agile, Scrum Alliance As a consultant he has worked with a range of organisations including the United Nations to set up their project management office designing and providing specialist advice and training across the spectrum of project management and business analysis, supporting their business life cycle. More recent assignments have included mentoring, coaching, and training for an investment bank integrating the traditional approach with agile. Read more

6th July

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PMI UK Toastmasters Event 13 July 2022 | 6:45 -9:00 pm

Hybrid event

PMI UK Toastmasters will give you the skills and confidence you need to effectively express yourself in any situation. Public speaking is a key project

13th July

FREE event management skill and Toastmasters is an efficient, enjoyable, and affordable way of gaining great communication and leadership skills. By learning to effectively formulate and express your ideas, you open an entirely new world of possibilities. You’ll be more persuasive and confident when giving presentations and you’ll improve your one-on-one dealings with others. This event will take place at the University of Westminster, Baker Street Campus, 35 Marylebone Road, London NW1 5LS You can also join this meeting via Zoom. The Zoom link will be sent ahead of the meeting. When registering, please state if you are attending via Zoom. Register by the 11th of July at 2:00pm Read more Bonus events! If you are a PMI UK volunteer, look out for the email from the Digital Events team inviting you to the (FREE) Kyle Murtagh workshops: • The Art of Facilitation (14 July) and • Evaluate to Elevate (26 July). These are only for the volunteers, so book your seat early to avoid disappointment!

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Who’s who?

Board Members

Nigel Smith, Director of Professional Development

Ciaran Smith, Chapter President

Chris Field, Vice President

Shola Ali, Director of Finance

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Merv Wyeth Director of Technology and Digital Events

Emma Arnaz-Pemberton , Director of Corporate Outreach

Rachel Wong, Director of Academic Outreach

Hugo Minney, Director of Volunteering

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Alla Antoniuk, Director of Marketing and Communications

Joanna Newman, Director of Membership

Tunde Ajia, Director of Operations

Franco Guarrella , Director of Branches

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If you wish to contact us, you can reach us by calling +44 (0) 20 8751 5626 between 9 AM and 4 PM Monday to Friday.

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