Estate Planning Workbook - Print

ESTATE PLANNING WORKBOOK

Wealth | Investments | Planning Commerce Trust Company

WHY ESTATE PLANNING

Regardless of the size of your investment accounts, everyone has an estate. Your estate comprises everything you own – your car, home, other real estate, investment and checking accounts, life insurance, furniture and other personal possessions. In a nutshell, estate planning is naming whom you want to receive your assets after you die and identifying someone to be responsible for distributing your assets according to your wishes. Additionally, an estate plan can convey your preferences if you become incapacitated and cannot make decisions for yourself. Before anything happens to you, you want to outline your wishes for life-prolonging medical care and for controlling how your possessions are given to the people or organizations that are important to you. While everyone needs an estate plan, creating one – or keeping it current – should be an especially high priority if you: ■ WANT TO BE PROACTIVE ABOUT HEALTH CARE DECISIONS IN THE EVENT OF YOUR INCAPACITATION ■ WANT TO ENSURE YOUR ASSETS AND PROPERTY ARE DISTRIBUTED ACCORDING TO YOUR WISHES ■ RECENTLY EXPERIENCED A SIGNIFICANT LIFE EVENT, SUCH AS MARRIAGE OR DIVORCE, BIRTH OR ADOPTION, RETIREMENT OR DEATH OF A FAMILY MEMBER ■ HAVE MINOR CHILDREN OR OTHER DEPENDENTS WHO ARE DISABLED OR HAVE SPECIAL NEEDS  ■ WANT TO MINIMIZE ESTATE TAXES OR PROTECT YOUR FAMILY FROM CREDITORS AND LAWSUITS ASSOCIATED WITH YOUR ESTATE While this workbook will not create your estate plan, it will help you understand the estate-planning process, gather important information, start thinking about key decisions you’ll need to make and prepare for conversations with estate-planning professionals who can help draft your plan. Fill in as much as you can. Record your questions in the space provided at the end of the workbook, and if you get stuck at any point, contact a Commerce Trust advisor for help. When you complete this exercise, you will have answered the following questions:  ■ WHO IS GOING TO MAKE FINANCIAL DECISIONS FOR ME IF I CANNOT MAKE THEM FOR MYSELF?  ■ WHO IS GOING TO MAKE HEALTH CARE DECISIONS FOR ME IF I CANNOT MAKE THEM FOR MYSELF?

 ■ HOW WILL MY ASSETS BE DISTRIBUTED WHEN I DIE?  ■ WHO WILL DISTRIBUTE MY ASSETS WHEN I DIE?  ■ WHO WILL CARE FOR MY CHILDREN WHEN I DIE?

1 | ESTATE PLANNING WORKBOOK

FIVE KEY ESTATE-PLANNING DOCUMENTS

There are five key documents that can help you answer important questions about health care decisions, distributing your assets and who you’d like to represent your interests when you cannot. Consider preparing the following documents. 1. POUROVER WILL A pourover will transfers your assets to your trust after your death and specifies who will be responsible for any minor children. It is called a pourover will because it “pours” your assets into your trust at your death to streamline and consolidate your plan. A pourover will should name an executor and legal guardian(s) for minor children.

Your executor or personal representative will be responsible for collecting your assets, filing all probate documents and submitting your final income tax return. You may choose a trusted individual, a corporate fiduciary or a combination of the two. Serving as an executor can be an overwhelming task, so if you decide to select an individual, consider naming an alternate in case the original appointee is unable to fulfill his or her duties.

COMMON EXECUTOR OPTIONS ■ Surviving spouse ■ Adult child ■ Commerce Trust Company

List the people or organizations you would consider as executor of your will.

NAME

PHONE

1. 2. 3 .

MINOR CHILDREN If you have minor children, you can use your will to name a guardian who will be responsible for making personal decisions with respect to your children, such as where the child will live, where he or she will attend school, and any medical decisions. Note: If it is in the best interest of the child/ children, you may choose a different person to care for them than the person you select to manage their money.

CHOOSING A GUARDIAN Consider the candidates’ age and health, personal and financial situation and number and ages of their children. Also think about the ages of your children and the faiths, philosophies and attitudes of everyone involved.

List the person(s) you would consider as a guardian for your minor children. NAME

PHONE

1. 2. 3 .

2 | ESTATE PLANNING WORKBOOK

FIVE KEY ESTATE-PLANNING DOCUMENTS

2. REVOCABLE TRUST A revocable trust allows your trustee to manage your assets for your benefit, if you become incapacitated, and specifies how your assets should be passed on. It can also help your beneficiaries avoid the administrative burden, public record, potential delays and lack of privacy associated with the probate process. A properly structured trust may help reduce your estate and gift taxes, and possibly offer your beneficiaries greater protection of your assets from creditors and lawsuits. It involves three parties: you, the grantor; the beneficiaries you name to receive your assets; and the trustee or trustees who agree to manage your assets as directed by the terms of the trust. A trustee is the person or trust company who works with your executor to collect all your assets, pay your debts, file your tax returns, and distribute the remainder of your estate according to your trust. When selecting trustees, consider their ability to invest and manage finances as well as their sensitivity to the distribution decisions you direct under the terms of your trust. You may choose a trusted individual, a corporate fiduciary or a combination of the two. If you decide to select an individual, consider naming an alternate in case the original appointee is unable to fulfill his or her duties.

Insert the names of the person(s) or organization(s) you would like to serve as your trustee.

PRIMARY

ALTERNATE

Sole Trustee Co-Trustee #1 Co-Trustee #2

After your representatives gather your assets, pay your debts and resolve tax issues, they are tasked with distributing the remainder of your estate to the beneficiaries you select. You have a number of options, including making specific gifts to individuals or charities. Your gifts can be given directly or through a trust. When you bequeath assets through a trust, you will need to provide guidelines for the distributions. You may decide to designate a specific dollar amount or percentage distributed at regular intervals, specified ages or certain life events (e.g., college graduation, marriage, etc.). You can also choose to give your trustee discretion to distribute funds for the beneficiary’s specific needs, such as health, education, emergencies, etc.

Request Commerce Trust’s checklists to help you evaluate individual and corporate trustee candidates.

TYPES OF TRUSTS ■ Trusts that are funded during your lifetime ■ Trusts established at the death of the first spouse for the benefit of the family in general ■ Marital trusts established at the death of the first spouse for the sole benefit of the surviving spouse ■ Trusts established at the death of the second spouse for benefit of children and grandchildren

3 | ESTATE PLANNING WORKBOOK

FIVE KEY ESTATE-PLANNING DOCUMENTS

It’s helpful to make a list of people or charitable organizations that you would like to name as beneficiaries. Think about whether you want to gift a dollar amount or a percentage of your estate.

NAME OF PERSON/ORGANIZATION RELATIONSHIP/CONNECTION

PHONE NUMBER

DOLLAR AMOUNT OR %

1.

2.

3.

TIPS ABOUT BENEFICIARIES Name primary and contingent beneficiaries for all of your accounts in case your primary beneficiary passes before you have an opportunity to update your documents. Contingent beneficiaries may include distant family members, friends or charitable organizations.

3. LIVING WILL A living will is a legal document that establishes your wishes for life-prolonging medical care should you become incapacitated. Without one, your health care providers and family will not have legally binding information about your desire for medical treatment, in the event you are unable to speak for yourself. Once this document is in place you will want to ensure it is easily accessible and that your family knows not only that you’ve created it but also how to find it. Consider giving a copy to anyone who may need to refer to it – such as your doctor before surgery – and keeping a copy for yourself in a safe-deposit box or home safe. 4. A HEALTH CARE POWER OF ATTORNEY A health care power of attorney empowers your designee to make decisions regarding your health care and medical treatment. A health care power of attorney only takes effect when you are unable to make decisions or communicate your intentions regarding treatment. If your health situation turns around and you decide to revoke your health care power of attorney, you may do so.

List the people you would consider making health care decisions on your behalf, in the event you become incapacitated.

NAME

PHONE

1. 2. 3 .

4 | ESTATE PLANNING WORKBOOK

FIVE KEY ESTATE-PLANNING DOCUMENTS

5. DURABLE POWER OF ATTORNEY A durable power of attorney grants another person the legal authority to act on your behalf in a general or limited capacity. A general durable power of attorney gives the person you choose, also known as the agent, the power to manage your assets and financial affairs while you are alive. The appointment may be for a set period of time and can be revoked by you at any time, providing you still have the legal capacity to do so. A limited durable power of attorney, on the other hand, allows you to give only specific powers to the agent, such as selling property, investing assets or making health care decisions. It can be used to allow your agent to handle specific matters when you are unavailable or unable to do so. When selecting an agent, you may want to consider his or her ability to invest and to manage finances. Also consider an alternate in the event your designee is unable to serve.

List the people or organizations you would consider naming as your agent.

NAME

PHONE

1. 2. 3 .

TIPS ABOUT AGENTS Your agent does not have to be the same person you designate to make medical decisions on your behalf.

5 | ESTATE PLANNING WORKBOOK

ESTIMATE THE VALUE OF YOUR ESTATE

Many people find their estate is larger than they originally thought when they add up the market value of their assets. You may find that your estate is even larger if your spouse dies first, and you need to account for his or her assets as well. Gather recent account statements and take an inventory of your assets. It is also helpful to make note of the location where you’ve stored relevant account paper work (e.g., your safe-deposit box, filing cabinet or online directory) for future reference. Commerce Trust clients can contact their advisor for help securing up-to-date market value.

DON’T FORGET To include less commonly considered assets in the value of your estate, which can be anything from season tickets to intellectual property. Consider all items of value when calculating your estate.

ASSETS

MARKET VALUE

LOCATION OF DOCUMENTS

Cash and liquid assets Checking accounts Savings accounts

$ $ $

CDs, money market accounts Investments Employer retirement benefits

$

IRAs and non-employer retirement accounts $ Other stocks, bonds, mutual funds, options, pensions, etc. $ Health savings account $ Real estate Personal residence $ Vacation home / time share $ Other real estate (e.g, investment property) $ Personal belongings Automobiles and recreational vehicles $ Jewelry, furs $ Collectibles (e.g., art, sports memorabilia, etc.) $ Furniture $ Other assets Business or partnership interests $ Life insurance policies $ Mortgages and other debts owed to you $ Other $ TOTAL $

6 | ESTATE PLANNING WORKBOOK

YOUR FAMILY TREE

Create your family tree in the chart below to help your estate planner fill in the details of your plan.

RELATIVE #1 Name:

Relationship:

Date of birth:

Spouse, if married:

Address:

RELATIVE #2 Name:

Relationship:

Date of birth:

Spouse, if married:

Address:

RELATIVE #3 Name:

Relationship:

Date of birth:

Spouse, if married:

Address:

RELATIVE #4 Name:

Relationship:

Date of birth:

Spouse, if married:

Address:

RELATIVE #5 Name:

Relationship:

Date of birth:

Spouse, if married:

Address:

RELATIVE #6 Name:

Relationship:

Date of birth:

Spouse, if married:

Address:

RELATIVE #7 Name:

Relationship:

Date of birth:

Spouse, if married:

Address:

RELATIVE #8 Name:

Relationship:

Date of birth:

Spouse, if married:

Address:

RELATIVE #9 Name:

Relationship:

Date of birth:

Spouse, if married:

Address:

7 | ESTATE PLANNING WORKBOOK

CHECK YOUR ESTATE PLAN

After you’ve completed this workbook and met with an estate planner, you may use the checklist below to ensure your plan addresses all key factors.

MY ESTATE PLAN:

Includes an up-to-date will. Names a guardian for my minor children. Names an executor (or personal representative) and trustee whom I am confident will carry out my wishes. Takes into consideration any special needs family members. Includes provisions for long-term health care for me and my spouse and/or other dependents, should the need arise. Takes advantage of the benefits of lifetime gifts. Includes charitable gifts. Provides investment assistance for family members who many need help managing their inheritances. Minimizes taxes. Provides for a smooth and tax-advantaged transfer of my business interests at my retirement or death, or if I become disabled. Establishes limits for spendthrift beneficiaries.

If you can’t check off each of the statements above, you may have a gap in your estate plan.

COMMERCE TRUST CAN HELP

Whether you are just starting or need to update your plan, Commerce Trust can help you explore your needs and connect you with estate-planning professionals who can prepare documents for you.

Disclaimer : This workbook is for informational purposes only. The workbook should not serve as a substitute to estate planning documents. The information provided herein should not be considered legal advice.

8 | ESTATE PLANNING WORKBOOK

NOTES

9 | ESTATE PLANNING WORKBOOK

Wealth | Investments | Planning Commerce Trust Company

Contact a Commerce Trust advisor today. 1-855-295-7821 | commercetrustcompany.com NOT FDIC INSURED | MAY LOSE VALUE | NO BANK GUARANTEE

Commerce Trust Company is a division of Commerce Bank. PC1406

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11

Made with FlippingBook - Online Brochure Maker