Evan M. Ostfeld, P.A. - October 2020

PRST STD US POSTAGE PAID BOISE, ID PERMIT 411

5421 N. University Dr., #102, Coral Springs, FL 33067 (866) BAD-RXRX • (866) I-SUE-YOU • (954) 227-7529 (954) 998-0075 Text • (954) 227-1243 Fax • evan@attorney4life.com

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

What Is Your Attorney4Life? 1

The Weird Things Celebs Tried to Trademark A Look at the Essure Mass Tort Lawsuit

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Spooky Strawberry Ghosts What Really Happened the Night Martians Invaded New Jersey?

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False Halloween Myths Perpetuated by the Media

RAZOR BLADES, STRAIGHT PINS, POISON, AND DRUGS OH MY… HALLOWEEN MYTHS THE MEDIA LOVES TO SCARE US WITH

For many people, Halloween is the time of year when certain spooky myths and superstitions come alive. It’s when we hear stories of black cats, witches, ghouls, ghosts and or bad luck. There are however some recent ones that often get perpetuated by both mainstream and social media — stories that frighten parents and create an anxious, fearful atmosphere. Razor Blades, Straight Pins, Poison, and Drugs For a long time, the razor blades in candy apples or other goodies have been a go-to media story. Every year around this time, you’re sure to see your local news running a segment that encourages parents to check their kids’ candy for possible tampering so they don’t swallow and ingest razor blades, straight pins, poison and or drugs. Fortunately there have been no documented cases of any child or parent finding such dangerous items in the annual “Halloween haul”. There has, however, been one lone case of a child

being poisoned. Sadly, in 1974, a father, Ronald Clark O’Bryan, who was dubbed the “The Candy Man” and “The Man Who Killed Halloween”, murdered his young son, Timothy, for $60,000 in life insurance proceeds. Prosecutors said there was enough potassium cyanide put in the Pixy Stix to kill three grown men. It took the Texas jury took only 46 minutes to return a guilty verdict worthy of the death penalty; O’Bryan was executed on March 31, 1984. THC THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) is the primary psychoactive compound found in cannabis and/or marijuana, and it’s the chemical that makes people high. In more recent years, there have been an increasing number of social media posts about THC-laced candy or edibles being found in kids’ candy bags. There are also news stories of THC-laced candy being found during warranted searches. However, that’s as far as the story goes, at least when it comes to Halloween. In 2019, police in Johnstown, Pennsylvania,

warned parents to be on the lookout for THC-laced candies after they found some in a bust. While the warning was certainly valid, nothing ever came of it. Should you check your child’s candy? Most definitely to ensure that it’s safe, though the dangers are negligible. It’s also important so you can snag some good candy choices before giving it back to them! That being said, children should never eat unwrapped or homemade treats while trick-or-treating. This has less to do with hidden dangers and more to do with simply not knowing what’s in those items, such as potential allergens.

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